A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘naziism

[URBAN NOTE] Five links about cities: noise, China, Central Asia, Bauhaus, suburbs

  • Guardian Cities notes the growing problem of noise pollution, and how it is the poor who suffer the most from this.
  • Guardian Cities shares photos depicting the scale of China’s urbanization and other transformations of the very land.
  • Guardian Cities shares photos of the apartment towers of post-Soviet Central Asia.
  • Citylab looks at how Bauhaus and the architects who belonged to that school tried to resist Naziism.
  • CityLab shares excerpts from Amanda Kolson Hurley’s new book Radical Suburbs, examining the real past and potential of suburbs for change.

[NEWS] Five politics links: Weimar violence, Nazi bios, Russia, US military, Ontario under Ford

  • Open Democracy notes how the unrestrained and unpunished violence of the far right helped doom the Weimar Republic.
  • VICE reports on a remarkable project, wherein an American in the 1930s solicited and received explanations from Germans as to why they became Nazis. (The letters’ language echoes.)
  • This Adnan Khan interview at MacLean’s with Russian expert Bobo Lo puts forth the origins and prospects of the Russian challenge to the world order.
  • Given the growing problems of the United States, the fact that American military power versus China or Russia cannot be guaranteed is something Canada needs to take into account. CBC reports.
  • Stephen Maher at MacLean’s makes the point that, with the casual corruption of the Doug Ford government, it is as if Ontario is living a Dukes of Hazzard episode.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto notes: transit fares, Scarborough subway, Bloor bikes, alt-right, Junction

  • blogTO notes that some would like a single fare for transit in Toronto.
  • News of the internal Metrolinx report concluding a one-stop Scarborough subway extension would not be viable should not be controversial. But then, that’s Toronto transit. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Chris Selley hopes that the approval of permanent bike lanes along Bloor means that the cyclist/driver war will come to an end, over at the National Post.
  • Torontoist reports on the identities of some of the white supremacists putting up alt-right posters around Toronto, with photos.
  • Toronto Life notes that someone in the Junction has put up an unfinished basement apartment for $500 a month. (The tenant would be expected to finish the job.)

[URBAN NOTE] Three Toronto notes: Neo-Nazis at Nathan Phillips, Toronto suburb photos, Yonge Street

  • So, the other day neo-Nazis had a demonstration in Nathan Phillips Square. Torontoist reports.
  • These photos from Toronto suburbs at their apogee, part of an exhibit at the Archives, are a must-see, here at Toronto Life.
  • This older CBC article noting two women who hiked up Yonge Street makes me think of projects in the days to come.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a team of students who caught footage of the August solar eclipse from a high-altitude balloon.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that the early Moon apparently had a very thin atmosphere for tens of millions of years.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to Elon Musk’s descriptions of his space ambitions.
  • Hornet Stories notes that many on the alt-right are upset that game Wolfenstein is all about shooting Nazis.
  • The LRB Blog notes the almost ridiculous irony of Conservative Theresa May wearing a bracelet with the image of radical leftist Frida Kahlo.
  • Russell Darnley looks at efforts to get Singapore restaurants to shift away from using environmentally damaging palm oil.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the overwhelming power of the NRA in the modern United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers ways we can do SETI better by having a less Eurocentric understanding of our own history.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Uzbekistan and Kyrgzystan could solve border issues through swapping enclaves.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the corrosive effect of Bannon, and journalistic culture generally, on politics.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.
  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of “The Ballad of the Green Berets”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.
  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans’ habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, “My Immortal”, has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)
  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.
  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry’s Auroville Café.
  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.
  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.

[NEWS] Four links about problematic history: swastika, Cornwallis River, castle restoration, humans

  • MacLean’s argues that, in Canada and arguably the West generally, it is much too soon to rehabilitate the swastika.
  • Global News reports on a proposal to rename Nova Scotia’s Cornwallis River.
  • This effort to engage in a minimalist, non-misleading restoration of a Spanish castle is controversial.
  • The argument that human history goes back millions of years, and encompass a huger area than thought, is compelling.

[URBAN NOTE] Four blog links about Toronto: Metrolinx, Christie Pits riots, Scarborough, parkettes

  • Steve Munro evaluates the next plans for Metrolinx for regional transit.
  • Evan Balgord at Torontoist looks back at the anti-Nazi Christie Pits riots of 1933.
  • Cheryl Thompson at Spacing looks at the extent to which gun violence in Scarborough is a symptom of deepening poverty.
  • Nikhil Sharma at Torontoist notes that private parkettes are an imperfect substitute for public parks.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 23, 2017 at 6:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “Strike Against Hitlerism”

In this weekend’s Historicist feature, David Wencer describes for Torontoist an early protest in Toronto against Nazi anti-Semitism and fascism.

On the afternoon of Tuesday, July 11, 1933, people began gathering in the park at Wellington and Bathurst Streets. Most of the men and women in attendance were labourers, and many were there to represent Toronto’s predominantly Jewish garment industry unions. Some were there to represent various left-wing Toronto political organizations, which were ideologically opposed to Adolf Hitler’s fascist policies and treatment of German workers. Others were motivated to protest by local newspaper reports of pogroms in Hitler’s Germany. Carrying signs and banners reflecting a variety of interests and causes, the crowd paraded up Spadina to Dundas, then east to University Avenue, and finally up University to Queen’s Park, where thousands of others joined. The protest brought together Torontonians of many affiliations, united in their determined opposition to “Hitlerism” and the events unfolding in Germany.

In the early months of 1933, the Toronto press reported regularly on the developments which were taking place in Germany following Adolf Hitler’s rise to power. These articles ran not just in the Yiddish-language Der Yiddisher Zhurnal and in radical leftist newspapers, such as Young Worker, but also in the four mainstream Toronto dailies. They described the increasingly restrictive conditions in Germany, and included reports of concentration camps and attacks on Jews in the streets. In their book Riot at Christie Pits, Cyril H. Levitt and William Shaffir write that Toronto’s newspapers “carried horrifying front-page reports of the atrocities against Jews during the first months of Hitler’s rule…In fact, because of the censorship of the media by the Hitler regime, Torontonians probably knew more about what was occurring to Jews in Germany during those fateful months than did most Berliners.”

A Jewish market on Kensington Avenue, January 14, 1932. City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 26172.
A Jewish market on Kensington Avenue, January 14, 1932. City of Toronto Archives, fonds 1266, item 26172.

April of 1933 saw the formation of a new Toronto group, the League for the Defence of Jewish Rights (not to be confused with today’s Jewish Defence League), whose leaders included Rabbi Samuel Sachs and Shmuel Meir Shapiro, editor of Der Yiddisher Zhurnal. The League soon emerged as Toronto’s leading Jewish protest group, and co-organized a massive meeting at Massey Hall on April 2. This meeting, which drew the support of numerous non-Jewish politicians and organizations, included the development of a strategy for countering local antisemitic sentiment, and the organization of a local boycott of German goods. The League was also instrumental in the formation of a new incarnation of a national-level Jewish organization, the Canadian Jewish Congress.

In 1933, Toronto’s Jewish population numbered around 46,000, and was heavily concentrated downtown, near the city’s many clothing factories. In her 1992 book Sweatshop Strife: Class, Ethnicity, and Gender in the Jewish Labour Movement of Toronto 1900–1939, Ruth A. Frager writes that, by 1931, approximately one-third of Toronto’s gainfully employed Jewish population worked in the needle trades, and that “Jews constituted roughly 46 per cent of the people employed in this sector in this city.”

Written by Randy McDonald

February 27, 2017 at 9:30 pm