A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘neanderthals

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkably eccentric orbit of gas giant HR 5138b.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impact that large-scale collisions have on the evolution of planets.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber noted yesterday that babies born on September 11th in 2001 are now 18 years old, adults.
  • The Crux notes that some of the hominins in the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain, ancestors to Neanderthals, may have been murdered.
  • D-Brief reports on the cryodrakon, a pterosaur that roamed the skies above what is now Canada 77 million years ago.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the political artwork of Jan Pötter.
  • Gizmodo notes a poll suggesting a majority of Britons would support actively seeking to communicate with extraterrestrial civilizations.
  • io9 has a loving critical review of the first Star Trek movie.
  • JSTOR Daily shares, from April 1939, an essay by the anonymous head of British intelligence looking at the international context on the eve of the Second World War.
  • Language Log notes a recent essay on the mysterious Voynich manuscript, one concluding that it is almost certainly a hoax of some kind.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the future of the labour movement in the United States.
  • Marginal Revolution considers what sort of industrial policy would work for the United States.
  • Yardena Schwartz writes at NYR Daily about the potential power of Arab voters in Israel.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections explains why, despite interest, Australia did not launch a space program in the 1980s.
  • Drew Rowsome provides a queer review of It: Chapter Two.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how government censorship of science doomed the Soviet Union and could hurt the United States next.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Volga republics, recent educational policy changes have marginalized non-Russian languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a glossy, fashion photography-style, reimagining of the central relationship in the James Baldwin classic Giovanni’s Room, arranged by Hilton Als.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net reports on the discovery of footprints of a Neanderthal band in Le Rozel, Normandy, revealing much about that group’s social structure.
  • Bad Astronomer’s Phil Plait explains why standing at the foot of a cliff on Mars during local spring can be dangerous.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a suggestion that the lakes of Titan might be product of subterranean explosions.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber considers how, and when, anger should be considered and legitimated in discussions of politics.
  • The Crux looks at the cement mixed successfully in microgravity on the ISS, as a construction material of the future.
  • D-Brief looks at what steps space agencies are considering to avoid causing harm to extraterrestrial life.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes new evidence that the Anthropocene, properly understood, actually began four thousand years ago.
  • Jonathan Wynn writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about how many American universities have become as much lifestyle centres as educational communities.
  • Far Outliers reports on how, in the 13th century, the cultural differences of Wales from the English–including the Welsh tradition of partible inheritance–caused great instability.
  • This io9 interview with the creators of the brilliant series The Wicked and the Divine is a must-read.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at a paper considering how teachers of German should engage with the concept of Oktoberfest.
  • Language Hat looks at a new study examining the idea of different languages being more efficient than others. (They are not, it turns out.)
  • Language Log looks at the history of translating classics of Chinese literature into Manchu and Mongolian.
  • Erik Loomis considers the problems the collapse of local journalism now will cause for later historians trying to do research in the foreseeable future.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on research suggesting that markets do not corrupt human morality.
  • Neuroskeptic looks in more detail at the interesting, and disturbing, organized patterns emitted by organoids built using human brain cells.
  • Stephen Baker at The Numerati writes, with photos, about what he saw in China while doing book research. (Shenzhen looks cool.)
  • The NYR Daily notes the import of the working trip of Susan Sontag to Sarajevo in 1993, while that city was under siege.
  • Robert Picardo at the Planetary Society Blog shares a vintage letter from Roddenberry encouraging Star Trek fans to engage with the Society.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money looks at the economy of Argentina in a pre-election panic.
  • Strange Company looks at the life of Molly Morgan, a British convict who prospered in her exile to Australia.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, in 1939, many Soviet citizens recognized the import of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact; they knew their empire would expand.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the treatment of cavemen, as subjects and providers of education, in pop culture.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul notes a bike tour of Bauhaus architecture in Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes the discovery of Beta Pictoris c, a second super-Jovian planet in that young system.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that the NASA Europa Clipper is moving ahead.
  • Crooked Timber shares a gorgeous night photo of San Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice.
  • The Crux notes what we are learning about the Denisovans.
  • D-Brief notes that Neanderthals were prone to swimmer’s ear.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some of the pop culture likes of Karl Marx.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the exoplanets of GJ 1061.
  • Earther notes how Icelanders mourned the loss of a glacier in a ceremony.
  • Whitney Kimball at Gizmodo looks at what the mass data loss of more than a decade’s worth of music at Myspace means for our Internet era.
  • Imageo shares photos of spiraling cloud formations photographed at night from space.
  • Ian Humberstone at The Island Review writes about his witnessing of the bonxies, birds of the Shetlands.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a report suggesting Trump joked about swapping Greenland for Puerto Rico.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the rhythmic dancing of the Shakers in 18th century America marked that sect as different.
  • Language Hat considers the humour of some philosophers.
  • Language Log notes the oblique commentaries of Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing on his city-state’s protests.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the idiocy of the Trump fetish for Greenland.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how astronomers have mapped the Local Void, of deep intergalactic space.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the future of Venice might be found in its becoming a Chinese portal into Europe.
  • Sean Marshall notes how the Ford government is undermining conservation in Ontario.
  • The NYR Daily shares some of the New York City photography of Phil Penman.
  • Starts With A Bang’s notes the immense storms of Saturn.
  • Strange Company shares a weekend collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Belarus plans on reorganizing its internal structures to try to minimize rural depopulation.
  • Nick Rowe at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative talks about monetary policy in metaphors.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguins from around the world.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul notes the recent death of I.M. Pei.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes what, exactly, rubble-pile asteroids are.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about definitions of home.
  • Centauri Dreams considers white dwarf planets.
  • The Crux notes how ultra-processed foods are liked closely to weight gain.
  • D-Brief observes that a thin layer of insulating ice might be saving the subsurface oceans of Pluto from freezing out.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the critical role played by Apollo 10 in getting NASA ready for the Moon landings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the American government’s expectation that China will seek to set up its own global network of military bases.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the Soviet Union’s Venera 5 and 6 missions to Venus.
  • Far Outliers looks at the visit of U.S. Grant to Japan and China.
  • Gizmodo notes a recent analysis of Neanderthal teeth suggesting that they split with Homo sapiens at a date substantially earlier than commonly believed.
  • io9 notes the sheer scale of the Jonathan Hickman reboots for the X-Men comics of Marvel.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the argument of Ted Cruz that people should stop making fun of his “space pirate” suggestion.I am inclined to think Cruz more right than not, actually.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the wave of anti-black violence that hit the United States in 1919, often driven by returned veterans.
  • Language Hat shares a recognizable complaint, written in ancient Akkadian, of bad customers.
  • Language Log shares a report of a village in Brittany seeking people to decipher a mysterious etching.
  • This Scott Lemieux report at Lawyers, Guns and Money about how British conservatives received Ben Shapiro is a must-read summary.
  • Benjamin Markovits at the LRB Blog shares the reasons why he left his immigrant-heavy basketball team in Germany.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at one effort in Brazil to separate people from their street gangs.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how ISIS, deprived of its proto-state, has managed to thrive as a decentralized network.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences and perceptions of his native region of New England, in southeastern Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how the Chang’e 4 rover may have found lunar mantle on the surface of the Moon.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that while Argentine president Mauricio Macri is polling badly, his opponents are not polling well.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of things to do in see in the Peru capital of Lima.
  • The Signal examines how the Library of Congress engages in photodocumentation.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal explains how he is helping native insects by planting native plants in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how scientific illiteracy should never be seen as cool.
  • Towleroad notes the questions of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as to why Truvada costs so much in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how family structures in the North Caucasus are at once modernizing and becoming more conservative.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how the distribution of US carriers and their fleets at present does not support the idea of a planned impending war with Iran.
  • Arnold Zwicky examines the tent caterpillar of California.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about smart animals: bees, wolves/dogs, cetaceans, Denisovans, Neanderthals

  • The Conversation notes how urban beekeepers can play a key role in saving bees from extinction.
  • Motherboard looks at the comparative intelligence, and generosity, of wolves versus their domesticated dog counterparts.
  • National Geographic looks at how marine mammals, particularly cetaceans, have been used in different militaries.
  • Smithsonian Magazine looks at how recent studies have demonstrated the diversity among Denisovan populations.
  • Smithsonian Magazine looks at the new consensus about the remarkable capabilities of Neanderthals.

[NEWS] Five science links: global warming, bees, Balsillie, backups, Neanderthals

  • New estimates suggest the costs of global warming will be in the tens of trillions of dollars, with warmer countries taking a particularly big hit. Motherboard reports.
  • Indigenous bumblebee populations in Canada are fast approaching extinction, with a certainty of major negative environmental effects. CBC reports.
  • MacLean’s reports on the return to prominence of Jim Balsillie, this time not so much as a tech mogul as a sort off tech skeptic.
  • This Motherboard article makes a somewhat far-fetched argument that Game of Thrones demonstrates the need for human civilization to have backups.
  • The Conversation reports on the recent discovery, in Serbia by a joint Serbian-Canadian team, of a Neanderthal tooth, and what this discovery means for our understanding of the deep past of humanity.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares Hubble images of asteroid 6478 Gault, seemingly in the process of dissolving.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the experience of living in a body one knows from hard experience to be fallible.
  • Gizmodo notes new evidence that environmental stresses pushed at least some Neanderthals to engage in cannibalism.
  • Hornet Stories notes the 1967 raid by Los Angeles police against the Black Cat nightclub, a pre-Stonewall trigger of LGBTQ organization.
  • Imageo notes the imperfect deal wrought by Colorado Basin states to minimize the pain felt by drought in that river basin.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the cinema of Claire Denis.
  • Language Log reports on the work of linguist Ghil’ad Zuckermann, a man involved in language revival efforts in Australia after work in Israel with Hebrew.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if the Iran-Contra scandal will be a precedent for the Mueller report, with the allegations being buried by studied inattention.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for NIMBYism leading to street urination.
  • Justin Petrone at North! looks at a theatrical performance of a modern Estonian literary classic, and what it says about gender and national identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw makes the case for a treaty with Australian Aborigines, to try to settle settler-indigenous relations in Australia.
  • John Quiggin looks at the factors leading to the extinction of coal as an energy source in the United Kingdom.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we are not yet up to the point of being able to detect exomoons of Earth-like planets comparable to our Moon.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the occasion of the last singer in the Ket language.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some cartoon humour, around thought balloons.