A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘new england

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • {anthro}dendum features a post by Kimberly J. Lewis about strategies for anthropologists to write, and be human, after trauma.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on exoplanet LHC 3844b, a world that had its atmosphere burned away by its parent star.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at Neptune from the perspective of exoplanets discovered near snow lines.
  • D-Brief reports on the new Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, installed at Kitt Peak to help map galaxies and dark energy.
  • Gizmodo
  • looks at how Airbnb is dealing with party houses after a fatal mass shooting.
  • The Island Review shares some drawings by Charlotte Watson, inspired by the subantarctic Auckland Islands.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the late 19th century hit novel Ramona, written by Helen Hunt Jackson to try to change American policy towards indigenous peoples.
  • Language Hat looks at how, until recently, the Faroese language had taboos requiring certain words not to be used at sea.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at a proposal to partially privatize American national parks.
  • The LRB Blog looks at what Nigel Farage will be doing next.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a speculative theory on the origins of American individualism in agrarian diversity.
  • The NYR Daily looks at an exhibition of the artwork of John Ruskin.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw remarks on a connection between Arthur Ransome and his region of New England.
  • Drew Rowsome shares an interview with folk musician Michelle Shocked.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel emphasizes the importance of the dark energy mystery.
  • Towleroad notes a posthumous single release by George Michael.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society celebrates the 12th anniversary of his blog, and looks back at its history.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Ingushetia after 1991.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at All Saints Day.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the new X-ray telescope eROSITA.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence of a recent collision between planets in the system of BD +20 307.
  • D-Brief notes the appearance of a strange new sort of storm on Saturn.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery by astronomers of a set of orbits that can direct comets into the inner solar system.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage shares some vintage Skylab photos of his native Massachusetts.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in 1786, the United states was uninclined to pay tribute to the Barbary States.
  • Gizmodo’s George Dvorsky reports on a new fossil discovery showing how quickly mammals took over after the Cretaceous.
  • The Island Review shares an essay by photographer Alex Boyd about his new book Isles of Rust, drawing from Lewis & Harris.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at sustainable butchery.
  • Language Hat notes that Sumerian cuneiform is now in Unicode.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log notes how the Indo-Iranian “don” so commonly forms part of the hydronyms for major European rivers.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money calls for an in-depth investigation of Donald Trump, not necessarily an impeachment.
  • The LRB Blog examines the background of the mass protests in Santiago and wider Chile.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an illuminating cartogram depicting the #elxn43 results in Canada.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the government of China has been using the NBA to buy social peace.
  • The NYR Daily interviews Naomi Oreskes about her campaign to have the science behind global warming, and the actions of the scientists involved, understood.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper concluding that traditional gender specializations in British families no longer provide a reproductive advantage.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the speed of gravity must equal the speed of light, if general relativity is to work.
  • Window on Eurasia examines the rapid and uncontrolled growth of urban populations in Kazakhstan.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Citizen Science Salon highlights Australian Michelle Neil, here.
  • Ingrid Robeyns argues at Crooked Timber that the idea of punitive taxation of the superrich is hardly blasphemous.
  • The Crux looks at the ongoing debate over the age of the rings of Saturn.
  • io9 notes the sad death of Aron Eisenberg, the actor who brought the character of Nog to life on DS9.
  • JSTOR Daily shares a debate on the ego and the id, eighty years later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Mitch McConnell may have started the movement of Elizabeth Warren towards the US presidency.
  • The Map Room Blog takes a look at the credible and consistent mapping of Star Wars’ galaxy.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Springsteen at 70 as a performer.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photo of a New England forest in fall.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes a sticker that straddles the line between anti-Muslim sentiment and misogyny, trying to force people to choose.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the strong anti-Russian sentiment prevailing in once-independent Tuva.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • The Crux takes a look at how those people who actually are short sleepers work.
  • D-Brief looks at a study noting how the moods of people are determined by the strengths of their phones’ batteries.
  • Dan Lainer-Vos at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at statistical certainty at a time of climate change.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how, and why, the New England Puritans believed human bone might have medical power.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the press coverage that created the alleged Clinton uranium scandal.
  • The Map Room Blog shares maps noting that, already, since the late 19th century much of the world has warmed more than 2 degrees Celsius.
  • Strange Company shares a diverse collection of links.
  • Daniel Pfau at Towleroad writes about possible deep evolutionary roots of homosexuality.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian republic of Karelia, despite its border with Finland, suffers from repression.

[NEWS] Five links: gay genes, stone walls, US wealth, beaches, media

  • That, as a new study suggests, there is no single gay gene, but rather multiple different originals for non-heterosexual sexual orientations and behaviours, makes intuitive sense to me. The Washington Post has one take.
  • Atlas Obscura looks at the history behind the stone walls of New England.
  • Justin Fox at Bloomberg examines how the once-commanding lead in incomes of the middle class of the United States over the middle classes of other countries is starting to fade.
  • CityLab looks at how, too often by design, beaches in the United States are inaccessible to mass transit. (Toronto is lucky.)
  • La Presse shares a proposal by Radio-Canada to move away from a media model of competing with other outlets towards one based on collaboration.

[ISL] Five #islands links: Shoal Lake 40, Martha’s Vineyard, Fogo, Ramea, Barbados

  • Maclean’s reports on how, a century after Shoal Lake 40 First Nation was made an island to provide drinking water for Winnipeg, it finally was connected to the mainland by a road.
  • CityLab reports on how the pressures of the tourist season make it difficult for many permanent residents of Martha’s Vineyard to maintain homes.
  • Fogo Island, Newfoundland, recently celebrated its first Pride Walk. CBC reports.
  • Yvette D’Entremont writes at the Toronto Star about how the diaspora of the Newfoundland fishing island of Ramea have gathered together for regular reunions.
  • J.M. Opal writes at The Conversation about the origins of white Anglo-American racism in 17th century Barbados.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the first time that an exoplanet, HR 8799e, has been directly observed using optical interferometry.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the possibility, demonstrated by the glimpsing of a circumplanetary disc around exoplanet PDS 70b, that we might be seeing a moon system in formation.
  • The Citizen Science Salon looks what observers in Antarctica are contributing to our wealth of scientific knowledge.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to articles looking at the latest findings on the Precambrian Earth.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas writes about his ambivalent response to a Twitter that, by its popularity, undermines the open web.
  • Gizmodo notes that NASA is going to open up the International Space Station to tourists.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how croquet, upon its introduction in the 19th century United States, was seen as scandalous for the way it allowed men and women to mix freely.
  • Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the unaccountable fondness of at least two Maine Republican legislators for the Confederacy.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the economic success of Israel in recent decades is a triumph of neoliberalism.
  • Stephen Ellis at the NYR Daily writes about the gymnastics of Willem de Kooning.
  • Drew Rowsome profiles out comic Brendan D’Souza.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the still strange galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, apparently devoid of dark matter.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever shares his theory about a fixed quantity of flavor in strawberries of different sizes.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a contentious plan for a territorial swap between Armenia and Azerbaijan.