A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘nightclubbing

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from mistaken city fears to Brunswick House to the Islands’ tents

  • In the National Post, John Hauer reports</ on how biases have led Canadians to name big cities like Toronto as the least safe in Canada.
  • In the Toronto Star, Scott Wheeler notes how friends of Andrew Kinsman have continued the search for the missing man in the Don Valley.
  • Also in the Star, Francine Kopun notes how, despite long hours, workers at Uniqlo in the Eaton Centre have voted against a union.
  • In The Globe and Mail, Susan Lightstone reflects on the legacy of the Annex’s Brunswick House, critical in her life. What will follow it?
  • Kathleen McDonnell at Torontoist notes how settlement on Ward’s Island began in a tent city a century ago.
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[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthropology.net notes on how a fossil tooth led eventually to the identification of the fourth Denisovan individual known.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about reasons for people to travel solo.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird notes that the INF Treaty is on the verge of collapse.
  • Mathew Ingram uses a recent GIF of Trump with the Polish president’s wife to show how these lie and mislead.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a sharp collapse in London’s LGBT venues–more than half in the past decade!
  • Marginal Revolution reports on British actors who take up tutoring as a second job to support their careers.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the latest concerns of South Koreans regarding their northern neighbour.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes issue with proposed Australian government surveillance of the local Internet.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell dissects the origins of the false claim that Copernicus was a Catholic priest.
  • Unicorn Booty has a fantastic interview with a scholar, Jamie Bernthal, who makes a case for queer content in Agatha Christie.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that methane bubble explosions in Siberia could wreck Russian pipelines.

[MUSIC] Four pop music links

  • Vice‘s Noisey celebrates the life and music of Israel Kamakawiwoʻole, whose medley of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow/What a Wonderful World” outlived him.
  • The AP describes how Britain’s pop music charts have changed to stop future bouts of Ed Sheeran-style domination.
  • Hannah Ellis-Peterson reports for The Guardian about how (and why) Sony has opened a new vinyl pressing plant in Japan.
  • Carla Gillis reported in May for NOW Toronto about David McPherson’s forthcoming book on the famed Horseshoe Tavern.

[URBAN NOTE] Four articles about changing Toronto neighbourhoods, and Hamilton as Brooklyn

  • NOW Toronto recently had a cover article looking at the history of the Annex’s Brunswick House, now converted to a Rexall. Could it have been the Bloor’s equivalent to the Drake?
  • The Toronto Star reports on growing tensions in Parkdale over the Metcap rent strike.
  • NOW Toronto looks at how artists are starting to take over the Galleria Mall, to imagine what could be.
  • NOW Toronto suggests that Hamilton could, maybe, be about to evolve into the GTA’s equivalent of Brooklyn.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the SPECULOOS red dwarf observation program.
  • The Crux examines VX nerve agent, the chemical apparently used to assassinate the half-brother of North Korea’s ruler.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos of the inhabitants of the Tokyo night, like gangsters and prostitutes and drag queens.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines Donald Trump’s tepid and belated denunciation of anti-Semitism.
  • Language Log looks at the story of the Wenzhounese, a Chinese group notable for its diaspora in Italy.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the by-elections in the British ridings of Stoke and Copeland and notes the problems of labour.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a post-Brexit map of the European Union with an independent Scotland.
  • Marginal Revolution reports that a border tax would be a poor idea for the United States and Mexico.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the art of the medieval Tibetan kingdom of Guge.
  • Otto Pohl notes the 73rd anniversary of Stalin’s deportation of the Chechens and the Ingush.
  • Supernova Condensate points out that Venus is actually the most Earth-like planet we know of. Why do we not explore it more?
  • Towleroad notes Depeche Mode’s denunciation of the alt-right and Richard Spencer.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi considers the question of feeling empathy for horrible people.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the thousands of Russian citizens involved with ISIS and examines the militarization of Kaliningrad.

[URBAN NOTE] “Fanfare for Hugh’s Room fundraiser upsets unpaid staff”

CBC News’ Stephanie Matteis reports on the employees of beleaguered Toronto music venue Hugh’s Room, upset that while their employers will benefit from a fundraiser their back wages are likely to be left unpaid. Surely they, too, deserve something from the music community?

The fanfare about a potential reopening of Hugh’s pub and entertainment lounge, better known as “Hugh’s Room” has many music lovers excited. But it’s upsetting some former staff members, who are still owed wages from the music venue.

The bar closed at the beginning of January, with owner Richard Carson facing insurmountable but undisclosed debt. Supporters have since stepped in to rebrand it as a not-for-profit entity through fundraising.

A GoFundMe campaign started Jan. 27 and has already raised more than $55,000 — more than a third of its goal.

Meanwhile, many who made about $12 an hour are left without compensation they’re owed.

Lisa Fullerton called Hugh’s Room “family,” which is partly why it felt like such a blow to her and others to feel “strung along” about being paid outstanding wages.

The single mom was a cook at the Dundas Street West establishment. She worked there on and off starting in 2010 and had cheques bounce twice in the last half year.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 15, 2017 at 5:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that a Toronto family known for its Christmas lights display may be forced to ratchet back by city inspectors.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the apparent discovery of Kuiper Belt objects around white dwarf WD 1425+540.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the possible orbital inclination of Proxima Centauri b, and points to another one speculating about upper limits to the masses of other exoplanets orbiting P_roxima Centauri.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to interviews with different historians noting how close the United States is to a scenario from 1930s Germany.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the actions of the American deep state to undermine elements of the Trump Administration seen as potentially threatening will certainly also undermine American democracy.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at reasons for the continuing gap in life outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer links to a paper looking at the effect of Huey Long’s populism on Louisiana’s economy, noting that he had little effect on the markets. This suggests that counting on the markets to reign in populists before the crash may be a mistake.
  • Strange Maps links to a map and history of the Gagauz of Moldova.
  • Torontoist looks at the continuing decline of live music venues in Toronto.
  • Towleroad notes the origins of Der Spiegel‘s cover art showing Trump with the severed head of lady liberty in a Cuban exile’s work.
  • Window on Eurasia notes differences between how Russians and Americans think about ethnicity and citizenship in their diverse societies.