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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog offers some advice as to how to cope with rejection.
  • Centauri Dreams shares Robert Zubrin’s take on the Drake Equation, and on ways it is lacking and could be improved.
  • Crooked Timber looks at a book examining (among other things) the interactions of libertarian economists with racism and racist polities.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting that, actually, people would react positively and with a minimum of panic to the discovery of extraterrestrial life.
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at Chandra Oppenheim, an artist who at the age of 12 in 1980 released an amazing post-punk album.
  • Gizmodo responds to the news that the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are roughly the same mass.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the effects of the dingo fence in Australia on native wildlife there.
  • Language Hat notes a new statistical analysis of literature that has found one of the sources of Shakespeare’s language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Trump’s many affairs make him eminently blackmailable.
  • The LRB Blog reports on why academic workers in the United Kingdom are getting ready to strike on behalf of their pension rights, starting next week.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the sharp ongoing decline in the population of Bulgaria, and wonders what can be done. What need be done, in fact, if Bulgarians as individuals are happy?
  • Anastasia Edel writes about the Russian-American community, and what it is like being Russian-American in the era of Trump, over at the NYR Daily.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that there seems to be no periodicity in extinction events, that there is no evidence of a cycle.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Buzz recommends twenty-four different novels for Valentine’s Day, drawing on the recommendations of employees of the Toronto Public Library.
  • Centauri Dreams links to a new paper suggesting there are thousands of objects of extrasolar origin, some tens of kilometres in size, in our planetary system right now.
  • D-Brief notes that cryptocurrency is hindering the search for extraterrestrial life, as miners buy up the graphics cards SETI researchers need.
  • Lyman Stone at In A State of Migration notes how unbalanced the marriage market can be for professional women in the United States interested in similar partners, especially for African-American women.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how deeply the dreams of Martin Luther King Jr. for racial equality in the United States were driven by anti-colonial nationalism in Africa.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the life and writing of Penelope Fitzgerald was influenced by two decades of living on the English coast, suspended between land and water.
  • At the NYR Daily, Melissa Chadburn tells of what she learned from counting, and queueing, and perservering in routines.
  • At The Numerati, Stephen Baker shares an excerpt from his new book, Dark Site, describing a teenager’s attempts to control a cognitive implant.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes issue with elements of the timing of Lyman Stone’s schedule for immigration controls imposed in the United Kingdom on Caribbean migrants.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla explains how scientists are keeping the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in good stead despite its age.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Timi Siytangco explains the history of the Philippines through nine Filipino foods.
  • Drew Rowsome is impressed by the power of The Assassination of Gianni Versace.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang explains why black holes have to contain singularities, not merely superdense normal matter.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the rather misogynistic essay of ideologue Vladimir Surkin about women and power, timed for Valentine’s Day.

[PHOTO] Me and a J car at Privé Revaux, New York City

Just east of Times Square on 42nd Street, Privé Revaux, a designer sunglasses line maintains right now a local outpost described alternatively as a pop-up store or a flagship store. (The article describing this as a pop-up store suggests it is slated to close to March.)

Located at 120 W. 42nd Street, the Privé Revaux flagship store, which soft-launched last week, will allow customers to try-before-they-buy and will feature four interactive vignettes that evoke personalities from the brand’s sunglasses – The Artist, The Billionaire, The Dreamer and The Explorer. Each social media-friendly vignette allows customers to physically step inside and utilize props, creating memorable moments. Easy-to-read handles and hashtags, including the brand’s signature #ReframeYourself, encourage social sharing.

In addition, the pop-up pays homage to New York City via a life-sized subway car covered in graffiti with campaign images inside. Patrons can be photographed in the subway car while wearing a pair of Privé Revaux sunglasses, including the new Icon Collection with styles such as The Einstein, The McQueen, The Karl and The Jackie O. Each design is crafted by hand with high-end materials including acetate and proprietary lightweight, yet durable metal alloy. Additional features include polarized lenses, newly designed hinge screws and more; again only retailing for $29.95 per pair (two pairs for $54.95).

I took advantage of the subway train.

J Train (1) #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #subway #train #priverevaux #graffiti #latergram

J Train (2) #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #subway #train #priverevaux #graffiti #latergram

J Train (3) #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #subway #train #priverevaux #graffiti #latergram

Me and a J car at Privé Revaux

Written by Randy McDonald

February 2, 2018 at 10:00 am

[PHOTO] Three photos from arrival in Manhattan

When the Lincoln Tunnel threaded onto West 36th Street just west of Ninth Avenue, I was ready.

Looking east on West 36th #newyorkcity #newyork #hellskitchen #skyline #towers #west36thstreet #west36th

The intersection of West 27th Street and Seventh Avenue, where the Megabus came to a stop, was likewise photo-worthy.

Looking down, West 27th and 7th Avenue #newyorkcity #newyork #west27thstreet #west27th #seventhavenue

When I finally disembarked just outside of the Fashion Institute of Technology, it was time to take a selfie. I made it.

Arrival selfie #newyorkcity #newyork #me #selfie #manhattan #seventhavenue #west27thstreet #west27th

Written by Randy McDonald

January 20, 2018 at 1:15 pm

[PHOTO] Reflection in a diagonally blocked mirror, Art Gallery of Ontario (@agotoronto)

The mirrored elevators of the Art Gallery of Ontario can lend themselves to interesting selfies.

Reflection in a diagonally blocked mirror #toronto #me #selfie #mirror #artgalleryofontario #elevator #mirror #diagonal

Written by Randy McDonald

January 6, 2018 at 9:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Apostrophen, author ‘Nathan Smith shares some of his favourite LGBTQ reads from the past year.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly asks her readers where their deepest roots lie.
  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross celebrates its 11th anniversary.
  • At Crooked Timber, Corey Robin takes issue with some attitudes of Democrats post-Alabama, especially regarding African-American voters.
  • D-Brief notes that the icy rings of Saturn apparently influence that planet’s ionosphere.
  • Imageo shares satellite photos of the Thomas wildfire in California, apparently worsened by climate change.
  • JSTOR Daily links to ten beautiful poems of winter.
  • Language Hat links to an interesting-looking thesis examining non-Indo-European words in proto-Indo-European.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at the underlying cycles leading to the speedy extinction of the passenger pigeon.
  • Lingua Franca takes a look at the modern use of the word “even” as a sort of intensifier. Tina Fey’s Mean Girls seems to be the source.
  • In the aftermath of the “Oumuamua scan, Marginal Revolution takes a look at the Fermi paradox. Where is everyone?
  • Neuroskeptic examines the universe of papers lacking citations, apparently only 10% of the total published.
  • Drew Rowsome shares some ideas for last-minute Christmas gifts, some naughty and some nice.
  • The blog Savage Minds is dead, long live its successor anthro(dendum)!
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shows readers ways they can pick up traces of the quantum universe safely at home.
  • Towleroad has a queer take on the new Star Wars. (No spoilers, please–I think there are spoilers in the link.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests language issues in Gaugazia, a Turkic enclave in Moldova, might trigger another bout of separatism there.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell has a new take on the cloud of bizarre videos that is #elsagate, introducing readers to the idea of algorithmic kitsch.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • James Bow shares a deeply personal memory about a streetcar stop by Queens Quay where his life was recently transformed.
  • D-Brief notes that antimatter is one byproduct of lightning. (Really.)
  • Daily JSTOR counsels against buying into the scam of “authenticity.”
  • Language Hat shares a 2005 essay by Patricia Palmer, talking about how the spread of English was intimately linked with imperialism, first in Ireland then overseas.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money is strongly against Black Friday.
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump’s hardline policies are not going to help bring about change in Cuba.
  • Out There talks about how we are able to be pretty sure that interstellar asteorid ‘Oumuamua is not an extraterrestrial artifact.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to imagine, economically, what an American Ontario would be like.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about some good local beer enjoyed in Chiapas.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares a list of ten scientific phenomena we should be thankful for, if we want to exist.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his Christmas bell flowering maple.