A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘north korea

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of truth in journalism.
  • Crooked Timber looks at the example of Trump and wonders why that kind of charismatic authoritarianism is popular.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a model of the inner debris disk of HR 8799.
  • Far Outliers looks at the cultural divergences between North and South Koreans.
  • Language Hat looks at the complexities of translating the obscenities of the Marquis de Sade.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the collapse of unions and makes a limited defense of Castro.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a plan in the United States to make social science research more productive.
  • The NYRB Daily shares Masha Gessen’s article talking about the hard choices she had to make in Putin’s Russia and their relevance to the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia’s Ukrainian policy may be self-destructive.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Crooked Timber looks at how evolutionary psychology can be used to justify monarchy.
  • Far Outliers shares an excerpt describing how methamphetamine is used as a secondary currency in North Korea.
  • The Frailest Thing shares quotes examining the link between seeing something and liking it.</li
  • Language Hat talks about ways of voicing surprise.
  • Language Log looks at a linguistically mixed language of China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues the recounts are far more likely to help Trump than Clinton.
  • Marginal Revolution points to an interesting book on the Cuban economy.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at the idea of a sanctuary city in the context of American federalism.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the complex legalities surrounding religion and disbelief in Russia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • A BCer in Toronto mourns the declining standards behind the Tim Horton’s apple fritter.
  • blogTO notes that the Toronto vs everybody T-shirt has been redone in the original Iroquoian.
  • Centauri Dreams considers Project Orion.
  • Dangerous Minds shares vintage North Korean anti-American art.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper suggesting that Mars’ climate may have been cold but for impacts and volcanism.
  • Far Outliers examines the booming Nanjing of the 1930s.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the Long Island Universiy strike.
  • The NYRB Daily examines Hillary Clinton’s troubles.
  • Personal Reflections uses a bus fire to examine the fragility of modern systems.
  • Towleroad shares news, and footage, of a Tom of Finland biopic.
  • Window on Eurasia links to a report sharing the costs of Russian aggression in Ukraine, including at least ten thousand people reported dead.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg notes the rise of populism in Mexico, looks at how Europe is losing its reputation as a renewable energy leader, looks at political protest in Zimbabwe, and looks at changing habits of Saudi oil ministers.
  • Bloomberg View notes the politicization of the Israeli army, looks at an effort to smuggle Korean pop culture into North Korea, and considers strategies to encourage Japanese to have more children.
  • The Globe and Mail considers the risky strategy of marijuana growers, who hope to get the government to back down as they do their thing before legalization.
  • MacLean’s notes that the outcry over the shooting of the gorilla in the Cleveland zoo is misconceived, and reports on Kamal al-Solaylee’s book about being brown.
  • NOW Toronto notes that one argument raised against letting permanent residents vote in Toronto is that Donald Trump allegedly has an apartment here. (Wrong, on multiple grounds.)
  • Open Democracy looks at how British authoritarianism is restrained by the European Union.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • Bloomberg notes two former British intelligence chiefs saying that the United Kingdom is safer within the European Union than without, wonders if Saudi Arabia will be able to accept the economic shocks involved in transitioning away from oil, suggests South Australia could profit hugely from storing nuclear waste, and shares one journalist’s experiences inside North Korea.
  • Via The Dragon’s Tales, I came across this Gizmag article reporting on a Dutch family living in a greenhouse.
  • The Inter Press Service notes controversies surrounding transnational humanitarianism.
  • The National Post wonders what non-endorsements of Trump by prominent members of the Republican Party will do to this institution.
  • Open Democracy writes about the ongoing revolution in gender relations in the Syrian Kurdish enclave of Rojava.
  • Wired reports on Sweden’s ongoing transition away from cash to a completely digital economy.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

  • 3 Quarks Daily notes a Financial Times article on the rebirth of brutalism.
  • Bloomberg looks at the Polish opposition’s upcoming protest and notes the promise of North Korea’s leaders not to use nuclear weapons first.
  • CBC notes the likely permanent displacement of many from Fort McMurray and reports on the failure of Marvel’s movies to be as progressive as the comics.
  • The Globe and Mail wonders if the NDP will survive.
  • MacLean’s notes the Parti Québécois’ planned leadership convention this fall.
  • Scientific American notes that global warming makes fires like Fort McMurray’s more likely.
  • The Toronto Star notes the likely role of surveillance and predictive policing in the future.
  • Universe Today notes that Enceladus’ water jets seem to occur when the moon is furthest from Saturn.
  • Wired notes the lack of an official Google Play desktop app in an article about people who designed a desktop app themselves.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Bloomberg notes the upcoming meeting of North Korea’s governing party, observes the absence of a groundswell in favour of Brexit in the United Kingdom, and notes NIMBYism can appear in many forms.
  • CBC reports on the upcoming summit of North American leaders, notes Mike Duffy’s first appearance in the Senate, reports on the likely huge toll of insurance payouts in Fort McMurray, and notes the dependence of many Syrian refugees on food banks in Canada.
  • The Independent notes that Brexit might depend on the votes of Wales, which could be swayed either way by the fate of the Port Talbot steel plant.
  • The Inter Press Service notes, in a photo essay, how Third World farmers are seeking a technological revolution for their industry.
  • National Geographic notes how Atlantic City is coping with rising seas, mainly badly in ways which hurt the poor.
  • Open Democracy considers the Argentine government’s likely approach to geopolitics in the South Atlantic.
  • Universe Today notes the possible discovery of a new particle and looks at how Ceres might, or might not, be terraformed.
  • Wired looks at a new documentary on film projectionists and reports on the difficulties of fighting the Alberta wildfire.