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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘north korea

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes the very recent discovery in Malaysia of the hitherto unsuspected Jedek language by anthropologists doing fieldwork.
  • Hornet Stories interviews the five stars of the new Queer Eye for the Straight Guy.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Trump plans to privatize the International Space Station.
  • JSTOR Daily links to some of the papers reflecting on the furor around Murphy Brown and that show’s depiction of single motherhood as a defensible choice.
  • Language Hat notes a contention that the more popular a language the more simplified its grammar will be. Is this correct?
  • Language Log notes how hockey terminology differs between the two Koreas, South Korea importing foreign words and the North creating neologisms.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money does not think a governmental shutdown in the US would have protected DREAMers.
  • Lingua Franca considers the different colloquial uses in English of “baked”.
  • The NYR Daily praises Suburra, a new crime drama set in contemporary Rome.
  • At Starts With A Bang, Ethan Siegel explains how scientists know that the universe is expanding.
  • Supernova Condensate explores the possibility that artificial intelligences might be readily locked into patterns of behaviours not taking human concerns into account and finds it not likely, barring huge design faults.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Khrushchev, not content with transferring Crimea from Russia to Ukraine, also considered border changes in Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Buzz, over at the Toronto Public Library, recommends some audiobooks, here.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay, by Kostas Konstantindis, exploring how near-future technology could be used to explore the oceans of Europa and Enceladus for life.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at the many languages used in Persia circa 500 BCE.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Fox News has retracted a bizarrely homophobic op-ed on the Olympics by one of its executives.
  • JSTOR Daily explores what is really involved in the rumours of J. Edgar Hoover and cross-dressing.
  • Language Hat, in exploring Zadie Smith, happens upon the lovely word “cernuous”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an article, and starts a discussion, regarding the possibility of a North Korean victory early in the Korean War. What would have happened next?
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump is helping golf get a horrible reputation.
  • Supernova Condensate examines the science-fiction trope of artificial intelligence being dangerous, and does not find much substance behind the myth. If anything, the direction of the fear should lie in the other direction.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at two books which consider the origins of the Cold War from an international relations perspective. What were the actors trying to achieve?
  • Window on Eurasia makes the argument that the powerful clan structures of post-Soviet Dagestan are not primordial in origin, but rather represent attempts to cope with state failure in that Russian republic.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the existential problems facing Capita from a Coasian perspective. How is its business model fundamentally broken?
  • Arnold Zwicky, in taking apart an overcorrection, explains the differences between “prone” and “supine.”

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Rex at Anthro{dendum} considers Ursula K Le Guin from as an anthropologist by background and interests, and as a denizen of a “Redwood Zone” of western North America with a particular climate.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the exceptional technical progress being made towards the next generation of space telescope technology.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos of collaborations between Grace Jones and Keith Haring in 1984 and 1986, when Haring painted the star’s body.
  • Gizmodo at io9 shares stunningly detailed photographs of the giant Pi1 Gruis, some 530 light-years away.
  • Hornet Stories shares a letter from the mother of a girl ten years old who describes how this theatre fan was positively affected by the Manhattan production of Kinky Boots.
  • Language Hat shares a Quora answer talking about the way Azerbaijani sounds to speakers of the related Turkish. Much discussion ensues.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares the disturbing report that moderate conservative Victor Cha has been rejected as a candidate for US ambassador to South Korea because he warns against war with the North.
  • The Map Room Blog shares disturbing maps showing the extent to which the water reservoirs of Cape Town have been depleted.
  • Non-binary writer Robin Dembroff argues at the NYR Daily that state recognition of non-binary gender identity, while well-meaning, is ultimately less good than the withdrawal of gender identity as a category of state concern.
  • The Planetary Science Blog wonders if space travel and space science, of the sort favoured by Society president Bill Nye, could become a bipartisan issue uniting Americans.
  • Seriously Science notes that at least some species of birds prefer to date before they pair-bond and have children.
  • Towleroad reports that The Gangway, oldest surviving gay bar in San Francisco, has shut down to make way for a new laundromat/movie theatre.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers the factors that lead the people in charge of industries facing decline to ignore this. Could the education sector be one of these, too, depending on future change?

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto transit links: shutdowns, future maps, ridership, King Street, North Korea

  • Transit Toronto shares a list of planned partial shutdowns for the Toronto subway in 2018, and makes the point this is good: This way, they can much-needed maintenance.
  • blogTO shares a future map of Toronto transit links, this one by the TTC highlighting its own dreams and hopes, many of which are planned and even funded already. I like this one.
  • Steve Munro at Torontoist considers whether or not the TTC can meet its goal of increased ridership, given (among other things) bottlenecks in service.
  • Ben Spurr notes the hope of the TTC that the King Street pilot project can be replicated elsewhere in Toronto, over at the Toronto Star. Queen Street seems one likely corridor for this to me.
  • Ben Spurr and Alanna Rizza report that Metrolinx, of all agencies, was apparently recently subjected to a cyberattack from North Korea. The Toronto Star has the report.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her love for New York’s famous, dynamic, Hudson River.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the amazing potential for pulsar navigation to provide almost absolutely reliable guidance across the space of at least a galaxy.
  • Far Outliers notes the massive scale of German losses in France after the Normandy invasion.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the latest on theories as to the origin of homosexuality.
  • Joe. My. God remembers Dr. Mathilde Krim, dead this week at 91, one of the early medical heroes of HIV/AIDS in New York City.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at what, exactly, is K-POP.
  • Language Log notes that, in Xinjiang, the Chinese government has opted to repress education in the Mongolian language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that the risk of war in Korea is less than the media suggests.
  • At Chronicle’s Lingua Franca, Ben Yagoda looks at redundancy in writing styles.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the complex relationship of French publishing house Gallimard to CĂ©line and his Naziphile anti-Semitism.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the latest images of Venus from Japan’s Akatsuki probe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the apparent willingness of Trump to use a wall with Mexico–tariffs, particularly–to pay for the wall.
  • Spacing reviews a new book examining destination architecture.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what I think is a plausible concept: Could be that there are plenty of aliens out there and we are just missing them?
  • At Strange Maps, Frank Jacobs shares a map of “Tabarnia”, the region of Catalonia around Barcelona that is skeptical of Catalonian separatism and is being positioned half-seriously as another secessionist entity.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that an actively used language is hardly the only mechanism by which a separatist identity can exist.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross examines the connections between bitcoin production and the alt-right. Could cryptocurrency have seriously bad political linkages?
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes GW170680, a recent gravitational wave detection that is both immense in its effect and surprising for its detection being normal.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting hot Jupiters are so large because they are heated by their local star.
  • Crooked Timber counsels against an easy condemnation of baby boomers as uniquely politically malign.
  • Daily JSTOR notes one paper that takes a look at how the surprisingly late introduction of the bed, as a piece of household technology, changed the way we sleep.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1968 newspaper interview with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, talking about Charlie Manson and his family and their influence on him.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the opioid epidemic and the way that it is perceived.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell suggests that the unsolvable complexities of Northern Ireland may be enough to avoid a hard Brexit after all.
  • The LRB Blog describes a visit to a seaside village in Costa Rica where locals and visitors try to save sea turtles.
  • Lingua Franca reflects on the beauty of the Icelandic language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an awesome map depicting the locations of the stars around which we have detected exoplanets.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the ill health of North Korean defectors, infected with parasites now unseen in South Korea.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the revival of fonio, a West African grain that is now starting to see successful marketing in Senegal.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating book examining the functioning of urban villages embedded in the metropoli of south China.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious 1920 murder of famous bridge player Joseph Bowne Elwell.
  • Towleroad reports on Larnelle Foster, a gay black man who was a close friend of Meghan Markle in their college years.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although Ukraine suffered the largest number of premature dead in the Stalinist famines of the 1930s, Kazakhstan suffered the greatest proportion of dead.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell has a photo essay looking at the Berlin Brandenburg Airport, still years away from completion and beset by many complex failures of its advanced systems. What does the failure of this complex system say about others we may wish to build?

[NEWS] Five notes about migration: United Kingdom, Vietnam, Canada, North Korea, Atlantic Canada

  • This examination by Bendetta Rossi of the ways in which immigration, in the context of the United Kingdom, has to remain an option even in the Brexit era is compelling. Open Democracy has more here.
  • This Nicolas Lainez study suggesting that Vietnamese migrants in the United Kingdom rescued from exploitative conditions might be made the worse off by the rescue, plunging them and their backers into debt, is distressing. How should they be helped? More here at Open Democracy.
  • Nicholas Keung describes how Canadian meat packers want their foreign labour forces to enjoy permanent resident status, so that they can have access to stable and reliable populations of workers. The Toronto Star has it.
  • Mary Ormsby describes how North Korean migrants in Toronto are facing the risk of deportation, to South Korea. More here, at the Toronto Star.
  • The Canadian federal government and Atlantic Canadian provincial governments have introduced a new program to try to direct more immigrants to the east coast. The Toronto Star has the article.