A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘oceans

[ISL[ Five islands links: Devil’s Island, Hainan, Hashima, Newfoundland, global warming floods

  • Business Insider shares some haunting photos of the old French prison island of Devil’s Island, in French Guiana, here.
  • China is authorizing a horse lottery for its tourist-heavy southern tropical island of Hainan. Bloomberg reports.
  • National Geographic shares photos of Japan’s Hashima Island, once a densely inhabited industrial conurbation and now at risk of succumbing entirely.
  • A fixed link between the island of Newfoundland and the Canadian mainland–more precisely, a rail link connecting the Northern Peninsula to a new route on the adjacent Labrador shore–may well be a viable proposal. CBC reports.
  • The worsening of wave-induced flooding on tropical islands might well make very many uninhabitable, by contaminating their water tables. National Geographic reports.
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum recommends design researcher Jan Chipchase’s Field Study Handbook for anthropologists interested in field practice.
  • Architectuul investigates strange similarities between buildings built in far-removed parts of the world.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at TESS, the next generation of exoplanet-hunting satellite.
  • Crooked Timber investigates the connections between the spiritualism of the 19th century and the fiction of the uncanny.
  • D-Brief notes the many names, often delightful, that newly-discovered locations on Mercury and Charon have received.
  • Cody Delistraty investigates two exhibitions of French satirists, including Charlie Hedo’s Georges Wolinski, to examine the nature of satire.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility of cryomagna leaving marks on the surface of Europa.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the strangely alien skies of TRAPPIST-1e. What would its sun look like? How would the other planets appear?
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the new prominence of multigenerational households in the United States. While a response to economic strains, it also looks back to past traditions.
  • Hornet Stories notes how, on RuPaul’s Drag Race, Monet X Change gave a decent explanation behind the surprisingly recent birth of the modern British accent.
  • Imageo notes how a massive blob of warm water is rising to the surface of the Pacific.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone explores the unique population history of Maine, to my eyes easily the most Atlantic Canadian of the fifty American states.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper exploring why modern video games can produce such rewarding experiences for players. (We can get meaning from many places.)
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexity of Chinese language classifications with a song by Yishi Band. What exactly is Yibin Sichuanese?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at an interesting question: When did Jews in the United States become white?
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the baffling reasons behind the poisoning of the Skribins with Novichok, and the science behind it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that this year, GDP per capita measured at PPP in Spain is higher than in Italy. (This probably says more about the disarray in Italy.)
  • The NYR Daily shares an interesting interview with cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences on a trip to the small Australian city of Armidale, in the region of New England.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on the tidy and clean, minimalist even, rural landscape of Estonia.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes brain scans that provide evidence of consciousness even in very young infants.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the Toronto production of the musical Fun Home, based on the Alison Bechdel graphic novel. I, for one, can’t wait to see it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, although Proxima Centauri is far too active a star for Proxima Centauri b to be Earth-like, that world could still plausibly host life-supporting environments.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy suggests a recent deal at the federal level in the US between Trump and Cory Gardner has created space for states to legalize marijuana without fear of federal intervention.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • D-Brief notes that global climate change seems already to have altered the flow of the ocean current system including the Gulf Stream.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the dialect, and cultural forms, of American loggers.
  • Taika Waititi, director of (among other movies) Thor: Ragnarok, has created controversy by talking about racism in his native New Zealand. (Good for him, I’d say.) Lawyers, Guns and Money reports.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at a strange public apology by a Chinese company, and what this says about Chinese politics.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shared this map depicting the many ephemeral states that appeared in the former Russian Empire after the October Revolution.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that there are very good reasons to believe in dark matter and dark energy, that these concepts are not just a latter-day version of the aether.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the many ways in which the Siberian republic of Tuva is a political anomaly in Russia.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley uses data from the National Graduates Survey to take a look at student regret in Canadian universities. To what extent does it exist? What disciplines is it concentrated in?

[NEWS] Five science links: Ukraine in space, Archean Earth, oceans of Mars, looking for life, Icarus

  • Ukraine is interested in funding spaceport developments in Australia. Transitions Online reports.
  • National Geographic notes evidence that the influx of oxygen into the Archean atmosphere more than two billion years ago was–geologically, at least–quite sudden.
  • Universe Today notes that volcanism on early Mars may have helped fill that planet’s primordial oceans.
  • National Geographic takes a look at the various strategies hypothetical extraterrestrial civilizations could adopt to find life–even us–from a great distance.
  • The discovery of Icarus, a discrete blue supergiant star detected nine billion light-years away, is a triumph of modern astronomy. VICE reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Ottawa, Markham, Moncton, Antwerp, San Francisco

  • The story of how the murder of Alain Brosseau by gay-bashers in Ottawa nearly thirty years ago led to lasting change is important to remember. The Ottawa Citizen reports.
  • This rather unique statue of a cow in Markham is still standing, despite neighbourhood discontent. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The closure of Saint-Louis-de-France Roman Catholic Church in Moncton surprises me somewhat, since Moncton is one of the few growing centres of the Maritimes. Global News reports.
  • The Belgian port city of Antwerp is looking to find some advantage from Brexit. Bloomberg reports.
  • The impact of sea level rise on San Francisco and the wider Bay area may be devastating. Wired reports.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new research suggesting that all modern Australian Aborigine languages descend from a single ancestor more than ten thousands years ago.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the search for one’s spiritual home.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the planned ESA ARIEL mission, intended to study exoplanet formation and atmospheres.
  • Crooked Timber considers the prospects for the university in the United Kingdom, post-strike.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting the worlds of TRAPPIST-1 might be too wet, too water-rich, to sustain life.
  • Cody Delistraty shares an interview with Nancy Jo Sales on everything from childhood to Facebook.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of human footprints on the seafloor off of British Columbia, predating the Ice Age.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that ocean worlds in the “ice cap zone” could manage to support life
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the observations to date of near-Jovian analogue world Epsilon Indi Ab.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes ambitious plans by one private space development company to set up a functioning cislunar economy.
  • Hornet Stories notes the upcoming re-release of Garbage’s second album, Version 2.0.
  • In A State of Migration’s Lyman Stone takes a look at the regional origins of German immigrants to the US in the mid-19th century.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Grindr shares private user data with third parties that, among other things, would allow them to determine the HIV status of different individuals.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the struggle for equal civil rights in Alaska, as indigenous people fought for equality.
  • The NYR Daily reports on an interesting exhibit of post-Second World War modern art from Germany.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal for unmanned probe missions to future incoming extrasolar asteroids like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux considers, in the context of recent (perhaps surprising) context, how scientists will one day record dreams.
  • Hornet Stories shares the report on a poll of younger gay people about the idea of monogamous relations versus open ones, suggesting there are signs a strong preference for monogamy isn’t well thought out.
  • Imageo notes that global warming, by leading to the breakup of icecaps, will worsen the sea ice hazard to maritime shipping.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how social workers are called to support serious social reform.
  • Language Hat notes a monument to the Cyrillic alphabet erected in Antarctica by Bulgarians.
  • In the era of Trump, Lingua Franca takes a look at the origin of the phrase “useful idiots”.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent article observing the decline of German cuisine in the United States. Who, or what, will save it?
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla talks about the latest exciting discoveries from Titan, including the odd distribution of nitrogen in its atmosphere and surface.
  • Towleroad notes how the discomfort of Ben Carson with transgender people leads him to consider the needs of homeless transgender people as secondary to this discomfort.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Cossacks in Russia are close to gaining recognition as a separate people.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests–jokes?–that intellectual history from 1900 can be explained substantially in terms of the uncritical adoption of a nomad science, starting from race science and continuing to today with Harry Potter.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a post reporting on a PhD student’s thesis, studying features of Chicano English.