A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘oceans

[NEWS] Twenty news links

  • NOW Toronto looks at the Pickering nuclear plant and its role in providing fuel for space travel.
  • In some places like California, traffic is so bad that airlines actually play a role for high-end commuters. CBC reports.
  • Goldfish released into the wild are a major issue for the environment in Québec, too. CTV News reports.
  • China’s investments in Jamaica have good sides and bad sides. CBC reports.
  • A potato museum in Peru might help solve world hunger. The Guardian reports.
  • Is the Alberta-Saskatchewan alliance going to be a lasting one? Maclean’s considers.
  • Is the fossil fuel industry collapsing? The Tyee makes the case.
  • Should Japan and Europe co-finance a EUrasia trade initiative to rival China’s? Bloomberg argues.
  • Should websites receive protection as historically significant? VICE reports.
  • Food tourism in the Maritimes is a very good idea. Global News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada lobster exports to China thrive as New England gets hit by the trade war. CBC reports.
  • The Bloc Québécois experienced its revival by drawing on the same demographics as the provincial CAQ. Maclean’s reports.
  • Population density is a factor that, in Canada, determines political issues, splitting urban and rural voters. The National Observer observes.
  • US border policies aimed against migration from Mexico have been harming businesses on the border with Canada. The National Post reports.
  • The warming of the ocean is changing the relationship of coastal communities with their seas. The Conversation looks.
  • Archival research in the digital age differs from what occurred in previous eras. The Conversation explains.
  • The Persian-language Wikipedia is an actively contested space. Open Democracy reports.
  • Vox notes how the US labour shortage has been driven partly by workers quitting the labour force, here.
  • Laurie Penny at WIRED has a stirring essay about hope, about the belief in some sort of future.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten JSTOR Daily links (@jstor_daily)

  • JSTOR Daily considers whether koalas are actually going extinct, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the life and accomplishments of Alexander Von Humboldt, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how a move to California doomed the Oneida Community, here.
  • JSTOR Daily considers how the genetically diverse wild relatives of current crops could help our agriculture, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the devastating flood of Florence in 1966, here.
  • JSTOR Daily points out there is no template for emotional intelligence, here.
  • JSTOR Daily explores some remarkable lumpy pearls, here.
  • JSTOR Daily notes an 1870 scare over the future of men, here.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the staging of war scenes for the 1945 documentary The Battle of San Pietro, here.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the bioethics of growing human brains in a petri dish, here.

[NEWS] Six cetacean links

  • Apparently upwards of 95% of dolphins are right-handed. Global News reports.
  • A dead sperm whale has been found in Scotland, choked on a hundred kilograms of plastic waste. CBC reports.
  • Tracking the heart rate of a blue whale is something that we can do. CBC reports.
  • Nearly a hundred cetaceans held in a Russian facility seem to be doing well after being released to their ocean home. CBC reports.
  • The policies of Elizabeth Warren could, if she was elected, impact the seafood industry of Atlantic Canada. (As, I think, they should.) CBC reports.
  • Whale populations can, if we treat them well, help save the climate from catastrophe. VICE makes the case.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 4, 2019 at 11:59 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Architectuul looks at the winners of an architecture prize based in Piran, here.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the wind emitted from one distant galaxy’s supermassive black hole is intense enough to trigger star formation in other galaxies.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber pays tribute to Jack Merritt, a young victim of the London Bridge attack who was committed to the cause of prisoner rehabilitation.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the history of French pop group Les Rita Mitsouko.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on the European Space Agency’s belief Earth-observing spacecraft are needed to track ocean acidification.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on the consensus of the Russian scientific community against human genetic engineering.
  • Far Outliers reports on the first ambassador sent from the Barbary States to the United States.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the life of pioneering anthropologist Franz Boas.
  • Language Log shares images of a bottle of Tibetan water, bought in Hong Kong, labeled in Tibetan script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money rightly assigns responsibility for the terrible measles outbreak in Samoa to anti-vaxxers.
  • The LRB Blog notes how tree planting is not apolitical, might even not be a good thing to do sometimes.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on a paper suggesting that food tends to be better in restaurants located on streets in Manhattan, better than in restaurants located on avenues.
  • Justin Petrone at north! shares an account of a trip across Estonia.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the photography of Michael Jang.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw continues to report from Armidale, in Australia, shrouded in smoke from wildfires.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the early days of the Planetary Society, four decades ago.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog looks at how centenarians in Sweden and in Denmark experience different trends in longevity.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the accidental discovery of the microwave background left by the Big Bang in 1964.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at the increasingly poor treatment of workers by employers such as Amazon through the lens of primitive accumulation.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the small differences separating the Kazakhs from the Kyrgyz.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a dance routine, shown on television in France, against homophobia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes a new detailed study suggesting that asteroid Hygeia is round. Does this mean it is a dwarf planet?
  • The Buzz notes that the Toronto Public Library has a free booklet on the birds of Toronto available at its branches.
  • Crooked Timber looks forward to a future, thanks to Trump, without the World Trade Organization.
  • D-Brief notes how the kelp forests off California were hurt by unseasonal heat and disease.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an impending collision of supergalactic clusters.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how judgement can complicate collective action.
  • Language Hat looks at the different definitions of the word “mobile”.
  • Language Log looks at the deep influence of the Persian language upon Marathi.

    Marathi and Persian

  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how, if anything, climate scientists make conservative claims about their predictions.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if planned power outages are a good way to deal with the threat of wildfires in California.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the ethnic cleansing being enabled by Turkey in Kurdish Syria.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There interviews archeologist Arthur Lin about his use of space-based technologies to discovery traces of the past.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the staggering inequality in Chile, driver of the recent protests.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Anthony Elghossain reports from the scene of the mass protests in Lebanon.
  • Drew Rowsome tells how his balcony garden fared this year.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at stellar generations in the universe. (Our sun is a third-generation star.)
  • Strange Company looks at the murder of a girl five years old in Indiana in 1898. Was the neighbor boy twelve years old accused of the crime the culprit?
  • Denis Colombi at Une heure de peine takes a look at social mobility in France.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers economic historians and their study of capitalism.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the pro-Russian policies of the Moldova enclave of Gagauzia, and draws recommendations for Ukraine re: the Donbas.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the dusty spiral of galaxy M81, here.
  • Crooked Timber reacts positively to the Astra Taylor short film What Is Democracy?
  • D-Brief notes that, in the South Atlantic, one humpback whale population has grown from 440 individuals to 25 thousand, nearly completing its recovery from whaling-era lows.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at The Iguanas, first band of Iggy Pop.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at consideration in South Korea at building an aircraft carrier.
  • Todd Schoepflin at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the division of labour within his family.
  • Far Outliers looks at 17th century clashes between England and Barbary Pirates.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how antibiotics are getting everywhere, contaminating food chains worldwide.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log looks at the evidence not only for an ancient Greek presence in Central Asia, but for these Greeks’ contact with China.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the attempt by Trump to get Ukraine to spy on his enemies was driven by what Russia and Hungary alleged about corruption in Ukraine.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the transnational criminal network of the Hernandez brothers in Honduras, a source of a refugee diaspora.
  • Marginal Revolution shares an argument suggesting that marriage is useful for, among other things, encouraging integration between genders.
  • Sean Marshall looks at how the death of the Shoppers World in Brampton heralds a new urbanist push in that city.
  • At the NYR Daily, Helen Joyce talks of her therapeutic experiences with psychedelic drugs.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Toronto play The Particulars.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if inflation came before, or after, the Big Bang.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever has a short discussion about Marvel films that concludes they are perfectly valid.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that central Ukraine has emerged as a political force in post-1914 Ukraine.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the Indian pickle.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a study suggesting the Milky Way Galaxy took many of its current satellite galaxies from another, smaller one.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks of the importance of having dreams.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a study explaining how the debris polluting the atmospheres of white dwarfs reveals much about exoplanet chemistry.
  • D-Brief notes that the intense radiation of Jupiter would not destroy potential traces of subsurface life on the surface of Europa.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the strange musical career of Vader Abraham, fan of the Smurfs and of the Weepuls.
  • Aneesa Bodiat at JSTOR Daily writes about how the early Muslim woman of Haajar inspires her as a Muslim.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how an influx of American guns destabilizes Mexico.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the American abandonment of the Kurds of Syria.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how many mass protests are driven by consumer complaints.
  • The NYR Daily has an interview with EU chief Brexit negotiator Guy Verhofstadt, on the future of sovereignty.
  • Strange Company looks at the Dead Pig War between the US and the UK on San Juan Island in 1859.
  • Towleroad features the defense of Frank Ocean of his PrEP+ club night and the release of his new music.
  • Understanding Society looks at the sociology of norms.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia and Ukraine each have an interest in the Donbass being a frozen conflict.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the weird masculinity of the pink jock.