A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘oceans

[ISL] Five islands links: Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Fiji

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  • I found, from somewhere in the blogosphere, a 1982 essay by June Jordan, “Report from the Bahamas.” How can solidarity and identity be established across great distances, geographic and otherwise, in a globalized world?
  • This analysis by Lyman Stone of the impact of Hurricane Maria on the already dire demographics of Puerto Rico is worth reading. Population decline will be at least as sharp as in Ireland and Corsica.
  • Will making Cape Breton a province separate from Nova Scotia, as suggested by independent senator Dan Christmas, do anything to stop the island’s sharp decline? The Cape Breton Post reports.
  • Climate change and sea level rise may effectively make mainland Nova Scotia an island, cutting the dike-protected roads on the Isthmus of Chignecto. VICE reports.
  • Fiji is preparing for an influx of climate change refugees from other, lower-lying and poorer, island nations in the Pacific. Bloomberg reports.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five notes: Montréal, New York City, Palm Springs, Johnstown, global warming

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  • The Guardian reports on a new exhibition dedicated to Leonard Cohen in Montréal’s Musée d’art contemporain.
  • Apartments in Manhattan lacking doormen have apparently become cheaper recently. Bloomberg reports.
  • The city council of Palm Springs, long a queer mecca, is now composed entirely of out LGBTQ people. The Desert Sun reports.
  • Politico visits Trump voters of the declining industrial city of Johnston and finds people who still support him.
  • National Observer shares maps of sea level rise revealing the exceptional vulnerability of the cities of Canada.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the effort to name, for New Horizons, Kuiper belt world (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility that Ceres might have a residual ocean underneath its surface.
  • D-Brief notes the bizarre supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have been a recurrent supernova for the past sixty years.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues we are already in a dystopia, one of Huxley not of Orwell.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Ezra Miller was advised not to come out by his supposed allies in Hollywood.
  • The LRB Blog notes an interesting exhibit, inspired by poetry and the Stalinist camp system, in London’s Bloomsbury Square.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane tells the old Swiss story of Charlemagne and the snake.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the last days of bullfighting in Tijuana.
  • Mark Simpson considers the state of masculinity in the modern United Kingdom, and calls for some tartiness.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how the Bullet Cluster of galaxies helps prove the existence of dark matter.
  • Understanding Society considers political power in China at the level of the village.
  • Window on Eurasia considers a variety of negative demographic trends for ethnic Russians in Russia, including low fertility and emigration.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that our first confirmed extrasolar visitor has been named, I/U2017 U1.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the dynamics allowing Enceladus to keep its subsurface water ocean.
  • Crooked Timber reacts to the alarming rift opening up between Saudi Arabia and its Shi’ite neighbours, including Lebanon and Iran.
  • D-Brief notes that the New Horizons team planners are seeking a new name for their next target, (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at some of the greeting cards designed for American Greetings by Robert Crumb.
  • Hornet Stories notes the rise of explicitly homophobic and transphobic ideologues in Paraguay, and its implications for wider South America.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes growing Democratic strength in Washington State.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a New York Times map of the Virginia election for governor.
  • The NYR Daily looks how the brutally quick shutdown of DNAInfo and the Gothamist network reflects the generally parlous state of journalism (among other things).
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the humble momo, a breakfast food in (among other places) Bhutan.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why quark fusion can never be a potent energy source.
  • Understanding Society celebrates its tenth anniversary.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the disinterest of most Russians in personally costly revolutionary actions.

[NEWS] Six notes about science: birds, Julie Payette, agriculture, wood in space, Enceladus, minds

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  • Can parrots, capable of speech, be witnesses in criminal cases? Maybe. Atlas Obscura reports.
  • Julie Payette’s speech in defense of science, regarding climate change and the like, might well have been a bit more politic. (Maybe.) MacLean’s looks at the controversy.
  • Was sedentary agricultural civilization a mistake, as some suggest? The New Republic reports on the state of the debate.
  • Scientific American reports on the United States’ 1960s probes Ranger 3 through 5, built partly of wood.
  • Universe Today notes a new model suggesting that a porous rocky core could help Enceladus keep a liquid water ocean for billions of years.
  • The Walrus reports on how two conjoined twins, who seem to have access to each other’s consciousness, are proving very interesting theories of mind.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the import of comet A/2017U1, a potential visitor from another planetary system, while Centauri Dreams also takes a look.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly celebrates Montréal’s Atwater Market, with photos.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes one report that Ceres’ primordial ocean may have mixed with its surface, to make a world covered in salty mud.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interactive French-language map looking at census data on different neighbourhoods in different cities.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the changing role of the judiciary as enforcing of order in a privatized world.
  • The NYR Daily wonders if North Korea’s government has firm control over its nuclear weapons, given American issues.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the expansion of Google Maps to other worlds in our solar system.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines the situation facing Catalonia, and Spain, after the UDI.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a photographic look at Little Mogadishu, a Somali neighbourhood in Kampala, Uganda.
  • Rocky Planet notes the ongoing risk of a major volcanic eruption at Tinakula, in the Solomon Islands.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the role and functioning of overlapping social identities.

[NEWS] Four space science links: water worlds, debris disks, Alpha Centauri, Kepler 1625 b-i

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  • Watery worlds orbiting red dwarf stars, in one scenario, tend to see their volatiles evaporate into space quickly.
  • Gaps in debris disks orbiting young stars seem to point to the existence of planets in these gaps.
  • The proposed Project Blue–a space-based telescope capable of imaging planets at Alpha Centauri–sounds good to me.
  • Kepler-1625 b-i, a strong candidate to be the first exomoon found, seems to have a fascinating history.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 26, 2017 at 9:40 pm