A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘oddities

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Centauri Dreams looks at the potentially deadly effect of the stellar flares of red dwarfs on potentially habitable exoplanets.
  • Charley Ross notes the strange 1957 disappearance of William ad Margaret Patterson from their Texas home.
  • D-Brief notes the evidence for a second planet at Proxima Centauri, a super-Earth Proxima C with a 215 day orbit.
  • Tom Yulsman of ImaGeo shares shares photos of the active Sun.
  • The argument made by Scott Lemieux of Lawyers, Guns and Money that Americans were learning to love Obamacare and Republicans wanted to take it away before they got used to it … well.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that, and why, restaurant servers in Maine wanted their minimum wage lowered. (Tips.)
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of Na De Fo, a rare Korean restaurant in Mexico City.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Macron might try to “California-ize” France, and whether he could pull this off.
  • Unicorn Booty notes studies noting bisexuals have a lower quality of life than gays, and wonders why. (Stigma is an issue.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes that global warming, by leading to permafrost melt, is literally undermining the infrastructure of Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] Five links in Toronto, from Andrew Kinsman to West Queen West to Egerton Ryerson

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  • With news that Toronto police is now treating the disappearance of Andrew Kinsman from his Cabbagetown a week ago as suspicious, the search for Kinsman is taking on new importance. Please, if you can help in any way, let Toronto police or his friends–anybody–know.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Hina Alam reports on the huge crush over the Canada Day weekend to see the World’s Largest Rubber Duck.
  • The Parkdale Villager‘s Hilary Caton reports on the push to make West Queen West a protected district.
  • The National Post shares the Canadian Press’ poll reporting on general anxiety, including among the well-off, on affordable housing in Canada.
  • The Globe and Mail‘s Kenny Sharpe writes about controversy at Ryerson University over the legacy of founder Egerton Ryerson.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait is skeptical that the Trump-era EPA will deal well with global warming.
  • Discover’s The Crux considers the challenge of developing safer explosives for fireworkers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering the (real) possibility of Earth-like worlds orbiting neutron stars.
  • Language Log notes an odd use of katakana in Australia.
  • The LRB Blog considers the possibly overrated import of George Osborne’s move into the newspaper business.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one observer’s suggestion that China could sustain high-speed growth much longer than Japan.
  • The NYR Daily shares Eleanor Davis’ cartoon journal of her bike trip across America.
  • Peter Rukavina does not like the odd way Prince Edward Island made its library card into a museum pass.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the odd galaxy MACS2129-1, young yet apparently no longer star-forming.
  • Strange Company explores the strange death of 17th century New England woman Rebecca Cornell.
  • Unicorn Booty looks at how early Playgirl tried to handle, quietly, its substantially gay readership.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at one Russian proclaiming Russia needs to stop an imminent takeover by Muslims.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the various challenges of being an independent person.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility of a Mars-mass planet in the Kuiper belt.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how the 5Pointz warehouse of NYC, once a graffiti hotspot, has been turned into a condo complex that at best evokes that artistic past.
  • Language Log explores the etymology of “sang”, a descriptor of a Chinese subculture of dispirited youths.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a Border Patrol raid on the No More Deaths encampment in Arizona, a camp that helps save migrant lives in the desert.
  • The Strange Company blogs about the mysterious 1829 disappearance of Judge John Ten Eyck Lansing from New York City.
  • Unicorn Booty describes three gay Muslim immigrants terrified of the implications of President Trump.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers pros and cons to the idea of religious arbitration.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the Qatar crisis is worsening Sunni/Shia tensions among the Muslims of Russia.

[META] On the latest blogroll expansion

Consider this post a consequence of a consolidation of my blogroll, with three posts from older blogs I’ve added previously and two new posts from new blogs.

  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross shares the strange story of five people who went missing in a winter wilderness in 1978.
  • Roads and Kingdom shares an anecdote by Alessio Perrone about a chat over a drink with a Cornishman, in a Cornwall ever more dependent on tourism.
  • Strange Company shares the story of Kiltie, a Scottish cat who immigrated to the United States in the First World War.
  • Starts With a Bang, a science blog by Ethan Siegel, argues that there is in fact no evidence for periodic mass extinctions caused by bodies external to the Earth.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, a group blog by Canadian economists, considers the value placed on Aboriginal language television programming.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Crooked Timber responds to The Intercept’s release of data regarding Russian interference with American elections.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on how Melanie Gaydos overcame a rare genetic disorder to become a model.
  • Dead Things seems unduly happy that it does seem as if Tyrannosaurus rex had feathers. (I like the idea.)
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on our ability to detect the effects of a planet-shattering Nicoll-Dyson beam.
  • The Frailest Thing considers being a parent in the digital age.
  • Language Hat notes the African writing systems of nsibidi and bamum.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Trump-supporting states are moving to green energy quite quickly.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russian guarantees of traditional rights to the peoples of the Russian North do not take their current identities into account.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO looks at a condo of 22 Wellesley Street East.
  • Centauri Dreams considers if Enceladus may have been recently shaped by a massive asteroid impact.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos from a Florida alligator farm where children could ride the reptiles.
  • D-Brief reports on the craters left by methane blowouts on the bottom of the Barents Sea.
  • Language Hat notes the apparently declining diversity of English dialects in England.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a nice passage arguing that reading is a cumulative progress, the reader progressing the more they read.
  • Spacing Toronto shares John Lorinc’s thoughts on the politics of the minimum wage.
  • Torontoist notes that the Lower Don Trail is nearing completion.