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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘oil

[BLOG] Five Marginal Revolution links (@margrev)

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  • Marginal Revolution features a critical if friendly review of the new Emmanuel Todd book, Lineages of Modernity.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the problems of excessive consumer activism, here.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new book looking at natural gas economics in Europe, here.
  • Marginal Revolution notes new evidence that YouTube algorithms do not tend to radicalize users, here.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the few countries where the average person was richer in 2009 than in 2019, notably Greece and Venezuela.

[NEWS] Twenty news links

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  • NOW Toronto looks at the Pickering nuclear plant and its role in providing fuel for space travel.
  • In some places like California, traffic is so bad that airlines actually play a role for high-end commuters. CBC reports.
  • Goldfish released into the wild are a major issue for the environment in Québec, too. CTV News reports.
  • China’s investments in Jamaica have good sides and bad sides. CBC reports.
  • A potato museum in Peru might help solve world hunger. The Guardian reports.
  • Is the Alberta-Saskatchewan alliance going to be a lasting one? Maclean’s considers.
  • Is the fossil fuel industry collapsing? The Tyee makes the case.
  • Should Japan and Europe co-finance a EUrasia trade initiative to rival China’s? Bloomberg argues.
  • Should websites receive protection as historically significant? VICE reports.
  • Food tourism in the Maritimes is a very good idea. Global News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada lobster exports to China thrive as New England gets hit by the trade war. CBC reports.
  • The Bloc Québécois experienced its revival by drawing on the same demographics as the provincial CAQ. Maclean’s reports.
  • Population density is a factor that, in Canada, determines political issues, splitting urban and rural voters. The National Observer observes.
  • US border policies aimed against migration from Mexico have been harming businesses on the border with Canada. The National Post reports.
  • The warming of the ocean is changing the relationship of coastal communities with their seas. The Conversation looks.
  • Archival research in the digital age differs from what occurred in previous eras. The Conversation explains.
  • The Persian-language Wikipedia is an actively contested space. Open Democracy reports.
  • Vox notes how the US labour shortage has been driven partly by workers quitting the labour force, here.
  • Laurie Penny at WIRED has a stirring essay about hope, about the belief in some sort of future.

[NEWS] Seven links about politics in Canada and around the world

  • The immigration fiasco in Québec shows the tension between different strains of local nationalism. The Conversation reports.
  • The Québec labour market, Le Devoir notes, actually bears up well to a comparison with Ontario. Gaps in employment have been closed, and then some.
  • Barry Saxifrage at the National Observer notes how, in terms of climate pollution, Alberta and Saskatchewan are heading in the opposite direction from the rest of Canada.
  • Many Canadians, displaced by the collapse of the oil economy, have gone south to Texas. Global News reports.
  • Will the divisions in the United States only get deeper? How bad will it get? MacLean’s considers.
  • The chaos in Iran, and the terrible death toll, deserve to be noted. Is the Islamic Republic nearing, if not its end, some other transition? Open Democracy theorizes.
  • Terry Glavin at MacLean’s notes how governments around the world are facing crises of legitimacy, here.

[NEWS] Ten #cdnpoli links

  • CBC looks at the internal splits within British Columbia, between the Liberal-leaning coast and the Alberta-leaning interior, here.
  • The legal departure of oil company EnCana from its Alberta headquarters is the cause of great upset. CBC reports.
  • Will Andrew Scheer survive as leader of the Conservative Party, with challengers like Peter MacKay? The National Observer reports.
  • People in Lloydminister, on the Alberta-Saskatchewan border, reflect the frustrations of the populations of the two provinces. CBC reports.
  • Philippe Fournier at MacLean’s writes about the sharp rural-urban political split in Canada.
  • Green Party Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin is interviewed by the National Observer about her goals, here.
  • The Treaty 8 chiefs have united in opposition to the separation of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Global News reports.
  • CBC reported on the multiple MP candidates who, genealogist Darryl Leroux found, falsely claimed indigenous ancestry.
  • Jessica Deer reported for CBC about the near-universal boycott by the Haudenosaunee of #elxn43, and the reasons for this boycott.
  • Scott Gilmore recently a href=”https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/the-u-s-is-sinking-maybe-its-time-for-canada-to-jump-ship/”>suggested at MacLean’s that, noting American instability, Canada might do well to secure itself and promote its multilateralism by seeking to join the EU.

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[NEWS] Ten #cdnpoli and #lexn43 links

  • Terry Glavin at the National Post suggests that #elxn43 saw Canada unusually and unhelpfully uncaring about the wider world, here.
  • Paul Wells at MacLean’s suggests that the collapse of Conservative votes in many Liberal-held areas, along other things, might mean the second Liberal government will pay less attention to Alberta.
  • An independent senator says that Trudeau appointing a senator from Alberta to his cabinet, for representation, would be a poor idea. CBC reports.
  • Matt Gurney at the National Post urges Albertan Conservatives to realize they are not alone in Canada.
  • Andrew Scheer seems safe as leader of the Conservatives for now. CBC has it.
  • The People’s Party and Maxime Bernier underperformed, but populism may yet have a future. Global News reports.
  • Maxime Héroux-Legault at The Conversation suggests Liberal electoral strategies inspired the revival of the Bloc Québécois, here.
  • Trudeau has promised to build the pipeline that Alberta wants. CBC has it.
  • David Frum at The Atlantic shares his own critical take on #elxn43, here.

[NEWS] #cdnpoli and #elxn41 items from across Canada: BC, Alberta, Québec, PEI

  • The affordability of rent was an election issue in British Columbia. CBC reports.
  • Philippe Fournier notes at Maclean’s that the sheer solidity of the Conservative vote in Alberta means that province will not get that much attention.
  • The Bloc Québécois has good reason to be exacerbating the clash between Québec and Alberta in the federal campaign. The National Post reports.
  • CBC reports on the growing unpopularity of the Liberals in Québec outside of Montréal, here.
  • That the Liberals had a campaign song that was initially translated very badly into French is a big gaffe. CTV News reports.
  • Philippe Fournier at Maclean’s noted the legendary volatility of Québec politics, here.
  • Will the Orange Line extension in Montréal be guaranteed funding, no matter who gets elected? CBC reports.
  • The fate of NDP Berthier-Maskonge MP Ruth Ellen Brosseau, elected in the 2011 Orange Wave, may determine the fate of the NDP in Québec. CTV News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada is likely to see substantial losses for the Liberals, as reported here.
  • Stu Neatby reports that advance poll turnout on PEI rose by 13% compared to 2015.
  • Will the PEI riding of Egmont go Conservative? CBC considers.

[NEWS] Five #indigenous links: Nunavut, Haisla, Ken Hill, McGill Redmen, New Richmond

  • This MacLean’s feature examines how, twenty years after the formation of Nunavut, some Inuit are considering new ways to make governance work in their interests.
  • This National Observer article looks at how one Haisla band government sees hope in the construction of a pipeline, one that would provide the community with needed revenue.
  • This Toronto Life feature by Michael Lista looks at the struggle by Six Nations-based businessman Ken Hill to avoid paying child support, using Indigenous sovereignty as a barrier.
  • This National Observer article looks at the successful campaign, led by student Tomas Jirousek, to get McGill University to drop the name McGill Redmen for their sports team.
  • CBC Montreal looks at the efforts to improve Indigenous representation on school curricula in the Gaspésie community of New Richmond.