A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ontario

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Markham, Hamilton, London, Detroit and Windsor, Vancouver

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  • Toronto Life takes a look at the new Aaniin community centre in Markham.
  • The Tower, an anarchist centre in Hamilton, got vandalized in turn after a spate of pointless anarchist vandalism on Locke Street. CBC reports.
  • Will the city of London get plugged into a high-speed rail route? One only hopes, and in the interim, one plans. Global News reports.
  • Making the border crossing between Detroit and Windsor a model for Ireland post-Brexit is a terrible idea. CBC reports.
  • Can Vancouver help solve the problem of housing for the young, including students, by having them rent rooms from compatible older folks? Global News examines the proposal.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: budgets, mass transit, Google, public space, cherry blossoms

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  • Steve Munro at Torontoist notes the serious medium-term budget problems likely to face the city of Toronto.
  • Oliver Moore notes the new federal/provincial partnership that will make $C 9 billion available for mass transit in Toronto, including a priority for funding the Downtown Relief Line. The Globe and Mail has it.
  • There are risks that come with inviting Google to become part of the infrastructure of Toronto. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Gilbert Ngapo notes that people have until the end of the month to send proposals to the Public Space Initiative. More places like the Bentway would be lovely. Metro Toronto has it.
  • I will, of course, be there in High Park to watch the cherry blossoms. blogTO reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of the polar regions of Jupiter, from Juno.
  • Centauri Dreams notes speculation on how antimatter could be harnessed for space propulsion.
  • D-Brief notes how nanotechnological design is used to create tools capable of extracting water from the air above the Atacama.
  • Russell Darnley notes the continuing peat fires in Sumatra’s Riau Province.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes evidence of an ancient cultural diffusion, from Copper Age Iberia, apparently not accompanied by gene flows.
  • Mark Graham links to a paper he co-authored looking at the viability of online work as an option, or not, in the Global South.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming documentary about Harlem fashion figure Dapper Dan.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the surprising controversy around the practice of keeping crickets as pets, for entertainments including music and bloodsports.
  • Language Log looks at the extent to which Xi Jinping actually has been identified as a Tibetan bodhisattva.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the extent to which Mexican society has also experienced negative effects from NAFTA, in ways perhaps not unfamiliar to Americans.
  • Lingua Franca considers the usage of the term “blockbuster”.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a new paper suggesting there is no neurogenesis in adult humans.
  • The NYR Daily features an eyewitness description of a botched execution in Alabama. This one does indeed seem to be particularly barbaric.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the rise of dictatorship worldwide.
  • Roads and Kingdoms <U?considers the simple joys of chilaquiles sandwiches in Guadalajara.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the vast bumber of starless planets, rogue planets, out there in the universe.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the fact, and the political import of the fact, that public-sector wages in Ontario are higher than private-sector ones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continuing decline of the Russian village, not helped by recent changes in policy under Putin.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the difference, in business, between pre- and post-funding investments.

[NEWS] Five Canada politics links: Ontario, Canada, Doug Ford, Alberta

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  • Despite being relatively unpopular himself, the Ontario PCs under Doug Ford could conceivably form a majority government. Global News reports.
  • Could Doug Ford become a populist hero for Canadians within and without Ontario? One wonders. MacLean’s considers.
  • Chris Selley notes that taking on Doug Ford represents a big risk for the Ontario PCs, over at the National Post.
  • Doug Ford as premier of Ontario, Chantal H├ębert notes at the Toronto Star, would destabilize politics Canada-wide.
  • The NDP government of Rachel Notley is running increasingly long odds of being re-elected, it seems. MacLean’s reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 14, 2018 at 9:15 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Yonge-Dundas Square, mass transit, book sales

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  • Some criticism of Yonge-Dundas Square may be merited, but I think it might be a bit too harsh. What we need is more seating on the square itself. Metronews carries it.
  • Humber Bay Shores is a lovely booming neighbourhood, but it really does need much better public transit options. For starters. The Toronto Star examines the neighbourhood.
  • Steve Munro has some more questions about Metrolinx planning in the GTA.
  • The Smarttrack solution proposed by Mayor John Tory may not be popular among some people in Scarborough. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The upcoming massive book sale at the Toronto Reference Library is one I will be paying attention to. blogTO reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Halifax, Hamilton, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Damascus

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  • Matthew McClearn describes the exceptional vulnerability of Halifax to sea level rise, and the apparent lack of significant preparation for this event, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • In the wake of a Black Bloc-style attack on businesses in Hamilton’s Locke Street, business owners say this isn’t the first time this has happened in recent months. CBC reports.
  • VICE reports on the nostalgia pervading the few surviving video stores of Los Angeles.
  • Mini Montgomery at Washingtonian notes how conservatives in Washington D.C. are finding dating more difficult these days, what with liberals and Democrats turning them down.
  • The highly selective devastation being visited on parts of Damascus is going to leave irremediable scars. The National Post reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: real estate, Public Space Incubator, Miniso, transparency

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  • Joe Castaldo at MacLean’s considers if, with more stringent rules on development and mortgages and foreign ownership, the real estate boom in the Greater Toronto Area might be ending.
  • Apparently instances of owners evicting tenants on the grounds that they would like to use these spaces for themselves are on the rise. blogTO reports.
  • blogTO notes a new institution in Toronto, the Public Space Incubator, that will provide funding to individuals and groups with innovative ideas as to what can be done with public spaces in the city.
  • Japanese-themed Chinese discount store chain Miniso will be opening a new location in the Eaton Centre. blogTO reports.
  • Edward Keenan makes the argument that more transparency is needed in Toronto politics, the better to ensure a better understanding by the public as to how the political process works, over at the Toronto Star.