A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ontario

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that Betelgeuse is very likely not on the verge of a supernova, here.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the mapping of asteroid Bennu.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber reposted, after the election, a 2013 essay looking at the changes in British society from the 1970s on.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about the Precambrian Earth, here.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about fear in the context of natural disasters, here.
  • Far Outliers reports on the problems of privateers versus regular naval units.
  • Gizmodo looks at galaxy MAMBO-9, which formed a billion years after the Big Bang.
  • io9 writes about the alternate history space race show For All Mankind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the posters used in Ghana in the 1980s to help promote Hollywood movies.
  • Language Hat links to a new book that examines obscenity and gender in 1920s Britain.
  • Language Log looks at the terms used for the national language in Xinjiang.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with Jeff Jacoby’s lack of sympathy towards people who suffer from growing inequality.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that urbanists should have an appreciation for Robert Moses.
  • Sean Marshall writes, with photos, about his experiences riding a new Bolton bus.
  • Caryl Philips at the NYR Daily writes about Rachmanism, a term wrongly applied to the idea of avaricious landlords like Peter Rachman, an immigrant who was a victim of the Profumo scandal.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking at the experience of aging among people without families.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the empty space in an atom can never be removed.
  • Strange Maps shares a festive map of London, a reindeer, biked by a cyclist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Mongolia twice tried to become a Soviet republic.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers different birds with names starting with x.

[NEWS] Twenty news links

  • NOW Toronto looks at the Pickering nuclear plant and its role in providing fuel for space travel.
  • In some places like California, traffic is so bad that airlines actually play a role for high-end commuters. CBC reports.
  • Goldfish released into the wild are a major issue for the environment in Québec, too. CTV News reports.
  • China’s investments in Jamaica have good sides and bad sides. CBC reports.
  • A potato museum in Peru might help solve world hunger. The Guardian reports.
  • Is the Alberta-Saskatchewan alliance going to be a lasting one? Maclean’s considers.
  • Is the fossil fuel industry collapsing? The Tyee makes the case.
  • Should Japan and Europe co-finance a EUrasia trade initiative to rival China’s? Bloomberg argues.
  • Should websites receive protection as historically significant? VICE reports.
  • Food tourism in the Maritimes is a very good idea. Global News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada lobster exports to China thrive as New England gets hit by the trade war. CBC reports.
  • The Bloc Québécois experienced its revival by drawing on the same demographics as the provincial CAQ. Maclean’s reports.
  • Population density is a factor that, in Canada, determines political issues, splitting urban and rural voters. The National Observer observes.
  • US border policies aimed against migration from Mexico have been harming businesses on the border with Canada. The National Post reports.
  • The warming of the ocean is changing the relationship of coastal communities with their seas. The Conversation looks.
  • Archival research in the digital age differs from what occurred in previous eras. The Conversation explains.
  • The Persian-language Wikipedia is an actively contested space. Open Democracy reports.
  • Vox notes how the US labour shortage has been driven partly by workers quitting the labour force, here.
  • Laurie Penny at WIRED has a stirring essay about hope, about the belief in some sort of future.

[NEWS] Fourteen links

  • By at least one metric, New Brunswick now lags economically behind a more dynamic Prince Edward Island. CBC reports.
  • NOW Toronto looks at toxic fandoms. (“Stanning” sounds really creepy to me.)
  • This CityLab article looks at how the particular characteristics of Japan, including its high population density, helps keep alive there retail chains that have failed in the US.
  • MacLean’s looks at Kent Monkman, enjoying a new level of success with his diptych Mistikôsiwak at the Met in NYC.
  • Can there be something that can be said for the idea of an Internet more strongly pillarized? Wired argues.
  • I reject utterly the idea of meaningful similarities between Drake and Leonard Cohen. CBC did it.
  • Toronto Life looks at the life of a Hamilton woman hurt badly by the cancellation of the basic income pilot, here.
  • Inspired by the death of Gord Downie, Ontario now has the office of poet-laureate. CBC reports.
  • Is Canada at risk, like Ireland, of experiencing two-tier health care? CBC considers.
  • A French immigrant couple has brought the art of artisanal vinegar to ile d’Orléans. CBC reports.
  • Shore erosion is complicating the lives of people along Lake Erie. CBC reports.
  • MacLean’s notes how Via Rail making it difficult for people without credit cards to buy anything on their trains, hurting many.
  • Michelle Legro notes at Gen that the 2010s is the decade where conspiracy culture became mainstream.
  • This essay by Robert Greene at his blog talking about what history, and historians, can do in our era is thought-provoking.

[URBAN NOTE] Fifteen Niagara Falls, Ontario links (#niagarafalls, #niagarafallscanada)

  • A new storyboard in Niagara Falls displays the importance of railways to the city. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • Niagara Falls city council is considering the idea of linking casinos by aerial car. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • Global News reports on a drug bust that saw two people arrested in Niagara Falls.
  • The Niagara Falls Review reports the number of reported homicides in Niagara Region tripled in 2019, to six.
  • The immersive live nativity hosted by a Niagara Falls church sounds interesting. More is here.
  • A recent discussion at Niagara Falls city council was dominated by discussion of housing issues and of homelessness. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • Most revenues from the casinos of Niagara Falls have been directed to the infrastructure of the city. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • City council in Niagara Falls has approved the construction of a 72-storey hotel. Construct Connect reports.
  • In November, the mayor announced the old city hall and courthouse in the downtown of Niagara Falls was scheduled to be demolished. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • The Bath House Hotel once was intended to be a centrepiece of local tourism. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • Carrie Bosco writes about the experience of a customer service associate working at the Niagara Falls Public Library, over at the Niagara Falls Review.
  • The Niagara Falls Public Library in winter is a happening place for locals. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • A Chinese developer hopes that a proposed $C 1.5 billion dollar project in south Niagara Falls will still go forward. The Niagara Falls Review reports.
  • Niagara Falls is going to have a hard time replacing city historian Sherman Zavitz. The Niagaa Falls Review reports.
  • Niagara News reports on the Winter Festival of Lights in Niagara Falls.

[NEWS] Seven links about politics in Canada and around the world

  • The immigration fiasco in Québec shows the tension between different strains of local nationalism. The Conversation reports.
  • The Québec labour market, Le Devoir notes, actually bears up well to a comparison with Ontario. Gaps in employment have been closed, and then some.
  • Barry Saxifrage at the National Observer notes how, in terms of climate pollution, Alberta and Saskatchewan are heading in the opposite direction from the rest of Canada.
  • Many Canadians, displaced by the collapse of the oil economy, have gone south to Texas. Global News reports.
  • Will the divisions in the United States only get deeper? How bad will it get? MacLean’s considers.
  • The chaos in Iran, and the terrible death toll, deserve to be noted. Is the Islamic Republic nearing, if not its end, some other transition? Open Democracy theorizes.
  • Terry Glavin at MacLean’s notes how governments around the world are facing crises of legitimacy, here.

[NEWS] Six links on journalism in Canada: Québec, Halifax, PEI, Guelph …

  • La Presse carries the concern of a Québec journalist that the decline of daily papers could have a catastrophic impact on the province’s culture.
  • The Québec government would like financially-stressed newspaper group to form a coop. CTV News reports.
  • That the Toronto Star shut down its free Metro affiliates across Canada made the news in Halifax. CBC reports.
  • The closure of the Transcontinental Media printing plant in Borden-Carleton means that PEI no longer has a local printer for its media. CBC reports.
  • Sabrina Wilkinson writes at The Conversation about the increasingly tenuous nature of journalism in Canada, not least as an employer.
  • This Alex Migdal piece looks at how Guelph, Ontario, has fared since the closure of the Guelph Mercury daily.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven city links: Innisfil, Buffalo, Ottawa, Montréal, Winnipeg, Amsterdam, Singapore

  • The town of Innisfil is looking forward to some very futuristic developments. Global News reports.
  • Jeremy Deaton at CityLab reports on how, buffered by the Great Lakes, Buffalo NY may end gaining from climate change.
  • The Ottawa chain Bridgehead Coffee has been sold to national chain Second Cup. Global News reports.
  • Many of the more eye-raising installations in the Gay Village of Montréal have since been removed. CTV News reports.
  • Warming huts for homeless people in Winnipeg were torn down because the builders did not follow procedures. Global News reports.
  • Open Democracy looks at innovative new public governance of the city budget in Amsterdam, here.
  • Singapore, located in a well-positioned Southeast Asia and with working government, may take over from Hong Kong. Bloomberg View makes the case.

[URBAN NOTE] Fifteen Kingston, Ontario links (#kingstonon)

  • CBC reports on suggestions that Kingston should plan for a population expected to grow significantly in coming decades, to not just expand but to have intensified development downtown.
  • The rental housing market for Kingston is very tight, not only because of large student populations. Global News reports.
  • Kingstonist reports on Queen’s plans to build a large new student residence on Albert Street, here.
  • The Whig-Standard carries an account of the new Queen’s principal being interrogated by Kingston city council over issues of friction between school and city, including costs for policing (and not only at Homecoming weekend).
  • This summer, farmers in the Kingston area saw poor crop production as a consequence of the weather. Global News reports.
  • Happily, the budget of the city of Kingston was made to accommodate costs for Murney, the police force’s horse. Global News reports.
  • Weston Food’s plant in Kingston has seen forty jobs cut. Global News reports.
  • Lake Ontario Park, in the west of the city, may be reopened to limited camping. The Whig-Standard reports.
  • Kingston hockey player Rebecca Thompson is now playing for the team of Queen’s. Global News reports.
  • Queen’s University is not alone in urging its exchange students in Hong Kong to evacuate. The Whig-Standard reports.
  • Yesterday, a plane crashed in the west of Kingston, killing all seven people aboard. CBC reports</u..
  • Chris Morris at Kingstonist has a long feature examining the Kingston Street Mission, interviewing outreach worker Marilyn McLean about her work with the homeless of the city.
  • Kingston-born street nurse Cathy Crowe talks about homelessness, in Kingston and across Canada. Global News reports.
  • The family of Royal Military College cadet Joe Grozelle, who disappeared from his campus and was later found dead two decades ago, wants his fate reinvestigated. Global News reports.
  • A hundred students at a Kingston public school are being taught how to skate, part of a pilot program. Global News reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven city links: Guelph, Innisfil, Montréal, Asbestos, Québec City, Alberta, Richmond

  • Guelph will be holding an open house to see what development will replace the Dolime Quarry. Global News reports.
  • The town of Innisfil has extended its Uber subsidy program for people in need of transit. Global News reports</u.
  • Archeologists in Montréal have found a mass grave of Irish famine victims. CTV reports.
  • The Québec town of Asbestos is changing its name so as to avoid the link, in English, with the toxic mineral. CTV reports.
  • A subway, alas, would be too big for Québec City. Streetcars would work better. Le Devoir reports.
  • Can a hyperloop be built to plug Edmonton together with Calgary? Global News considers.
  • Richmond, British Columbia, has unveiled a cultural harmony strategy to help its diverse population get along. The National Post reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven city links: Ottawa, Longueuil, Montréal, Winnipeg, Saint John, Halifax, Lethbridge

  • The Ottawa Citizen suggests a recent audit of OC Transpo should have offered warnings of the Confederation Line problems to come.
  • A project office has been set up for the extension of the Yellow Line in Longueuil and elsewhere on the south shore. CTV News reports.
  • La Presse looks at the concerns of some artists in Rosemont-La-Petite-Patrie that they might be forced out by gentrification.
  • That the Bay Building in downtown Winnipeg has been evaluated as being of little value offers an opening to Heritage Winnipeg. Global News reports.
  • The New Brunswick government is forcing suburbs of Saint John to pay for city facilities that they also used. Global News reports.
  • Short-term rentals are having a negative effect on real estate markets in Halifax. Global News reports.
  • Downtown Lethbridge faces struggles to attract business. Global News reports.