A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ontario

[URBAN NOTE] Four notes about cities, communities: Smiths Falls, Oshawa, Halifax, same-sex couples

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  • I am glad that Smiths Falls survived–it was lovely when I visited in 2003. If it is marijuana that saved it, good. From Global News.
  • That Oshawa–the ‘Shwa, to GTAers–has managed to evolve past dependence on cars is a very good thing indeed. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Can Halifax support the proposed light rail network? This sounds like a good idea, but I would say that, then. Global News describes the proposal.
  • Patrick Cain does a great job analyzing the 2016 Census data on same-sex couples in Canada: distribution, ages, etc. His analysis is at Global News.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Bakhtinian Caribana to climate and environment to Leslie Spit

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  • Spacing hosts Cheryl Thompson’s article examining Toronto’s Caribbean festival as a Bakhtinian organized chaos.
  • VICE examines how social housing in Canada will be hard-hit by climate change, including rising temperatures.
  • Torontoist shares a sponsored guide to attractions in the Ontario Greenbelt.
  • Laura Howells at the Toronto Star notes that if garlic mustard has to be an invasive plant in the forests of Ontario, at least it helps that it is a tasty invader.
  • Julien Gignac reports on the mystery of who the artist building shrines at Leslie Spit actually is.

[NEWS] Five links about Canada, from #Canada150 travel to cultural visibilities

  • In The Globe and Mail, Ian Brown and Nam Phi Dang’s photo essay tracking the adventures of a bus of Chinese tourists who went from Toronto to the Island and back is insightful and amusing.
  • Alex Ballingall’s account in the Toronto Star of his week-long trek along the Trans-Canada Trail from Niagara to Toronto is enlightening. Would I could do this …
  • Mark Milke in MacLean’s argues that, regrettable excesses aside, Canadians should be proud of our British heritage.
  • The Montreal Gazette‘s Brendan Kelly wonders why a supposedly Canadian music compilation does not include any French-language songs.
  • In the Toronto Star, Emma Teitel points out that visibility, including corporate visibility, is hugely important in Pride.

[NEWS] Seven links, from drugs in Germany to dolphin cuisine to dual nations in Australia

  • Johann Hari writes for Open Democracy about what may be the beginning of the end of the drug war in Germany.
  • I am not in agreement with Joseph Couture’s argument in NOW Toronto that the Internet has ended gay communities. (Convince me.)
  • Samantha Edwards reports in NOW Toronto controversy regarding the Parkdale feminist street art event. Was it really intersectional?
  • James Cooray Smith wonders–or “wonders”–why some Doctor Who fans are so upset with a woman portraying the Doctor.
  • In MacLean’s, chief Perry Bellegarde argues that more Canadians should be concerned with the too-many deaths of young First Nations people in Thunder Bay.
  • The National Post tells the story of how Australian senator Larissa Walters had to unexpectedly resign her position on account of her Canadian birth.
  • Via James Nicoll, a paper claiming evidence of human presence in northern Australia, in Madjedbebe, 65k years ago.
  • National Geographic tells of the peculiar way some Gulf of Mexico dolphins prepare their catfish. Is it cultural, culinary even?

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links, from condo conversions to a cat park to unsafe beaches

  • John Michael McGrath argues at TVO that leaving Toronto for Ontario cities with cheaper housing misses the issue of jobs. For starters.
  • Michelle McQuigge looks at how the CNIB is helping make Yonge and St. Clair accessible to the blind.
  • In The Globe and Mail, Erik Heinrich looks at how a mid-rise office tower at 1133 Yonge Street is being transformed into condos.
  • The Toronto Star reports that the condo/hotel tower at 325 Bay Street no longer bears the name of Trump. Toronto is free!
  • The end of the Palace Arms rooming house at King and Strachan, Christian Controneo notes at Torontoist, must be seen as terrible for the people who live there.
  • blogTO notes that E. Coli levels on mainland Toronto beaches make them unsafe for swimmers. No lake water this year!
  • blogTO notes that Montréal architect Claude Cormier, designer of HTO and Berczy, will next do a cat-themed park.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.
  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.
  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Lego TTC to private nude beaches to University Avenue

  • Global News reports on Jackson’s Burger, driven from Yonge Street by high rent.
  • blogTO shares this man’s collection of TTC vehicles done in Lego. It is truly impressive.
  • Steve Munro reports on the cost of renovating the Bloor-Danforth subway.
  • The Toronto Star reports on the private nudist swimming resorts in the GTA. There are no legal public nude beaches without Hanlan’s.
  • The Globe and Mail‘s Dave Leblanc reports on the embattled traffic islands of University Avenue.