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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ottoman empire

[BLOG] Five JSTOR Daily links (@jstor_daily)

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  • JSTOR Daily provides advice for users of Zotero and Scrivener, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at instances where product placement in pop culture went badly, here.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the import of a pioneering study of vulgar language in the context of popular culture studies, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the–frankly terrible–policies of managing rival heirs in the Ottoman dynasty, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at generational divides on religion in the England of the early Protestant Reformation, here.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes the circumstances of the discovery of a low-mass black hole, only 3.3 solar masses.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul.
  • The Crux looks at Monte Verde, the site in Chile that has the evidence of the oldest human population known to have lived in South America.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia may provide India with help in the design of its Gaganyaan manned capsule.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing talks of his work, including his upcoming conference and his newsletter, The Convivial Society. (Subscribe at the website.)
  • Gizmodo shares the Voyager 2 report from the edges of interstellar space.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the East India Company and its corporate lobbying.
  • Language Hat shares an account from Ken Liu of the challenges in translating The Three Body Problem, linguistic and otherwise.
  • Language Log looks at the problems faced by the word “liberation” in Hong Kong.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the implications of the surprising new relationship between Russia and the Philippines.
  • Marginal Revolution seems to like Terminator: Dark Fate, as a revisiting of the series’ origins, with a Mesoamerican twist.
  • Sean Marshall announces his attendance at a transit summit in Guelph on Saturday the 9th.
  • Garry Wills writes at the NYR Daily about his experience as a man in the mid-20th century American higher education looking at the rise of women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the strangely faint distant young galaxy MACS2129-1.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the possibility of Latvia developing a national Eastern Orthodox church of its own.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Ingrid Robeyns at Crooked Timber takes us from her son’s accidental cut to the electronic music of Røbic.
  • D-Brief explains what the exceptional unexpected brightness of the first galaxies reveals about the universe.
  • Far Outliers looks at how President Grant tried to deal with the Ku Klux Klan.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the surprising influence of the Turkish harem on the fashion, at least, of Western women.
  • This Kotaku essay arguing that no one should be sitting on the Iron Throne makes even better sense to me now.
  • Language Hat looks at the particular forms of French spoken by the famously Francophile Russian elites of the 19th century.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how teaching people to code did not save the residents of an Appalachia community.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 19th century, the young United States trading extensively with the Caribbean, even with independent Haiti.
  • At the NYR Daily, Colm Tóibín looks at the paintings of Pat Steir.
  • Peter Rukavina writes about how he has been inspired by the deaths of the Underhays to become more active in local politics.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society shares his research goals from 1976.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the conflicts between the Russian Orthodox Church and some Russian nationalists over the latter’s praise of Stalin.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at dragons in history, queer and otherwise.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes new evidence that the Pathfinder probe landed, on Mars, on the shores of an ancient sea.
  • The Crux reports on tholins, the organic chemicals that are possible predecessors to life, now found in abundance throughout the outer Solar System.
  • D-Brief reports on the hard work that has demonstrated some meteorites which recently fell in Turkey trace their origins to Vesta.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog explores sociologist Eric Klinenberg’s concept of social infrastructure, the public spaces we use.
  • Far Outliers reports on a Honolulu bus announcement in Yapese, a Micronesian language spoken by immigrants in Hawai’i.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the import of the autobiography of Catherine the Great.
  • Language Hat reports, with skepticism, on the idea of “f” and “v” as sounds being products of the post-Neolithic technological revolution.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen is critical of the idea of limiting the number of children one has in a time of climate change.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reflects on death, close at hand and in New Zealand.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious disappearance, somewhere in Anatolia, of American cyclist Frank Lenz in 1892, and its wider consequences.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel identifies five types of cosmic events capable of triggering mass extinctions on Earth.
  • Towleroad reports on the frustration of many J.K. Rowling fans with the author’s continuing identification of queer histories for characters that are never made explicit in books or movies.
  • Window on Eurasia has a skeptical report about a Russian government plan to recruit Russophones in neighbouring countries as immigrants.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores themes of shipwrecks and of being shipwrecked.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Crux makes the case that, for too long, modern homo sapiens have underestimated the genius of the Neanderthals.
  • D-Brief looks at the efforts of some scientists to develop brewing standards for the Moon.
  • Language Hat examines different languages’ writing standards–Turkish, Greek, Armenian–in the late Ottoman Empire.
  • Language Log deconstructs claims that Japanese has no language for curses.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen looks at the standards of truth by which Trump’s supporters are judging him.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the hollow Styrofoam aesthetics of the Trump Administration.
  • Savage Minds considers the idea of personhood.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell considers key mechanics of populism.
  • Arnold Zwicky meditates, somewhat pornographically, on a porn star of the last decade and public sexuality.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Dangerous Minds looks at the oddly sexual imagery of zeppelins entering their births.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper looking at ways to detect Earth-like exomoons.
  • Imageo notes unusual melting of the Greenland icecap.
  • Language Log shares an extended argument against Chinese characters.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the hundredth anniversary of the Sykes-Picot agreement to partition the Ottoman Empire.
  • The NYRB Daily notes authoritarianism in Uganda.
  • Noel Maurer looks at the problem with San Francisco’s real estate markets.
  • Towleroad follows RuPaul’s argument that drag can never be mainstreamed, by its very nature.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that a flourishing Ukraine will not be itself restore the Donbas republics to it.

[LINK] Luke Coffey at Al Jazeera on Russia and Turkey

Luke Coffey’s opinion piece at Al Jazeera places the current breakdown in Russia-Turkey relations in the context of generally intense competition between the two post-imperial (?) countries.

The West might view recent events between Russia and Turkey as a new phenomenon, but this fails to take into account the complex and fraught relationship between the countries.

The downing of the Russian jet is simply the latest drama in a saga that has been playing out since the middle of the 16th century.

In one form or another, Russia has driven Turkish foreign and defence policy for centuries. Since 1568, Turkey and Russia have been to war 12 times. At least nine of the occasions have been over Crimea – which Russia illegally annexed last year.

Imperial Russia and the Ottoman Empire have contested regions in the Black Sea, the South Caucasus and the Balkans for centuries.

In 1772, Russian troops raided and briefly occupied Ottoman territory in the Levant. Even during World War I, Russian troops got within 160 kilometres of Ottoman-controlled Baghdad. The ensuing friction led to much bloodshed.

After World War II, Joseph Stalin’s designs on Turkey’s Eastern Anatolia Region and Soviet Russia’s wish to control the Turkish Straits were what originally drove Turkey into NATO’s arms.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 2, 2015 at 3:51 pm