A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘poland

[NEWS] Five links: American gun owners, Japanese inequality, Polish politics, Lexit, #elsagate

  • The small minority of American gun owners who own huge numbers of guns, more than they could seemingly use, is the subject of this study at The Guardian.
  • The Japanese economy may be growing, but so is inequality, Bloomberg reports.
  • This Open Democracy examination of the sharpening political divides in Poland, particularly outside of Warsaw, is gripping. It starts with the self-immolation of Upper Silesian Piotr SzczÄ™sny in his country’s capital.
  • Julian Savarer takes a look at the many problems with “Lexit”, the idea of a left-wing argument for Brexit.
  • James Bridle looks at the complex human and artificial mechanisms behind the production of so much wrong children’s video content. #elsagate is only the tip of it all. Medium hosts the article.
Advertisements

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the Earth can easily survive without us.
  • blogTO notes that the Aga Khan Museum recently made an appearance in Star Trek: Discovery, as Vulcan.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the way neutron star collisions and kilonovas can be used to examine physical laws in extreme circumstances.
  • Hornet Stories notes that trans political candidate Danica Roem, in Virginia, is getting lots of positive attention.
  • The LRB Blog visits Gdansk only to find popular anti-Muslim xenophobia thriving.
  • The NYR Daily looks at photographic and other legacies of the Jamaica dancehall scene.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the evolution of SETI from the 1960s to the present.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the struggle of astronomers, in West Texas and elsewhere, to preserve dark skies.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the ways in which GW170817 has confirmed the Standard Model.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that reactionary conservatism in Russia is making that country’s HIV/AIDS epidemic worse.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Charley Ross reports on an unexpected personal involvement in the disappearance of Kori Gossett. Did an informant know?
  • Citizen Science Salon reports, in the time of #sharkweek, on the sevengill sharks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article on the Chinese base in Sudan.
  • Inkfish has a fascinating article describing how New Zealand’s giant black swans went extinct, and were replaced.
  • Language Hat notes two obscure words of Senegalese French, “laptot” and “signare”. What do they mean? Go see.
  • Language Log argues that the influx of English loanwords in Chinese is remarkable. Does it signal future changes in language?
  • Lawyers, Guns Money notes how Los Angeles and southern California were, during the American Civil War, a stronghold of secessionist sentiment, and runs down some of the problems of Mexico, including the militarization of crime.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on what books by which authors tend to get stolen from British bookstores.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that Donald Trump is not likely to be able to substantially reshape NAFTA.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the recent protests in Poland against changes to the Supreme Court.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the structure of the cities of medieval Europe, which apparently were dynamic and flexible.
  • Unicorn Booty shares some classic gay board games.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is going to try to wage a repeat of the Winter War on Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin considers imaginable ways to get carbon dioxide in the atmosphere down to 350 ppm by 2100.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the tenuous nature of the upper-middle class in America. How is downwards mobility to be avoided, even here?
  • Imageo shows the growth of a sunspot larger than the Earth.
  • Language Hat shares the story of how Manchu script came to be.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the working poor need protection from arbitrary and always-changing work schedules.
  • The LRB Blog notes the geopolitical scramble at the Horn of Africa, starting with bases in Djibouti.
  • The NYR Daily engages with an intriguing exhibition about the relationship between Henry James and paintings, and painting.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw engages with the classic 1937 Australian film, Lovers and Luggers.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money notes that one benefit of the trend towards greater informality in fashion is that time has been freed up, especially for women.
  • Peter Rukavina writes about his new Instagram account, hosting his various sketches.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the continuing problems with Germany’s adoption laws for same-sex couples.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how the Polish president saved the independence of Poland’s courts with his veto.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia is trying to mobilize the ethnic Russians of Lithuania, finally.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg looks at the recent surge of Chinese investment in Southeast Asia.
  • Culture.pl looks at why Nietzsche falsely claimed Polish ancestry.
  • Foreign Policy suggests that this is a new age of German prominence in the West.
  • The New Yorker finds Amazon’s new brick-and-mortar bookstores lacking.
  • The Toronto Star shares claims that learning a second language provides mental benefits.
  • Universe Today notes the discovery of potentially habitable super-Earth Gliese 625 b.
  • Vice’s Motherboard notes how the popularization of ayahuasca-driven spirit quests has actually hurt traditional users.
  • Vox notes the latest Russia-Ukraine history fight on Twitter.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams describes a new type of planet, the molten hot rubble cloud “synestia”.
  • Far Outliers describes the Polish rebels exiled to Siberia in the 19th century.
  • Language Hat looks at words for porridge in Bantuphone Africa.
  • Language Log examines whistling as a precursor to human language.
  • The LRB considers the new normal of the terrorist state of emergency.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the weakness of the Indian labour market.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to explain to Uruguayans how Donald Trump made his mistake on the budget.
  • Savage Minds remembers the late anthropologist of Polynesia and space colonization, Ben Finney.
  • Towleroad examines the rather depressing idea of a porn-dominated sexuality.
  • Understanding Society examines Hindu/Muslim tensions in India.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the weakness of Belarus’ opposition.
  • Arnold Zwicky talks about Arthur Laurents.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the need for opponents of Trump to fight, not just the man but the root causes.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a study suggesting Proxima Centauri is gravitationally bound to Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos depicting the devastation of Gatlinburg by fire.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that stars with close-orbiting rocky worlds seem to have above-solar metallicity, and considers the albedos of exoplanets.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Poland’s Communist government tried to undermine Pope John Paul II in 1979.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a lawsuit lodged against the American government demanding the release of information regarding the Russian information hack.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes poor working conditions in Bangladesh.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a Yoruba tongue twister.
  • The Planetary Society Blog links to China’s planned program of space exploration.