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Posts Tagged ‘poland

[PHOTO] King Jagiello Monument, Central Park

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The King Jagiello Monument, commemorating the battle won by the 15th century Polish king Jagiello and his (mainly) Lithuanian allies over the Teutonic Knights, stands at the east end of Turtle Pond.

King Jagiello Monument, from the south #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #centralpark #poland #statue #kingjagiello #kingjagiellomonument #latergram

The bronze monument was created for the 1939 New York World’s Fair’s Polish pavilion by the Polish sculptor Stanisław K. Ostrowski (1879–1947). It stood at the Fair’s entrance at Queens’ Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. It is a replica of a King Jagiello memorial in Warsaw that was converted into bullets for World War II by the Germans after they entered and occupied the capital of Poland.

As a result of the German invasion of Poland that marked the beginning of the Second World War, the personnel and equipment of the Polish World’s Fair pavilion was forced to remain in the United States. Unlike much of the rest of the pavilion which was sold to the Polish Museum of America in Chicago, the monument stayed in New York, thanks in part to mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia publicly lobbying to keep the statue. The statue was presented to the City of New York by the King Jagiello Monument Committee, with support from the Polish government in exile in July 1945, when it was permanently placed in Central Park with the cooperation of the last consul of the Second Polish Republic or pre-communist Poland in New York, count Józef Kazimierz Krasicki and unveiled by him.


Written by Randy McDonald

March 1, 2018 at 11:45 am

[NEWS] Five politics links: Patrick Brown and Ontario, NDP and abortion, First Nations, Franco, EU

  • Arshy Mann at Daily Xtra notes that the fall of moderate Patrick Brown might embolden social conservatives in the Ontario Progressive Conservatives.
  • CBC notes the belated clarification of the NDP that its opposition to federal government requirements for NGOs offering summer jobs does not mean it is reneging on support for abortion rights.
  • The Nisenan tribe of California had recognition of their native status stripped by the federal government in the 1960s, and they want it back. VICE reports.
  • The dead of the Spanish Civil War are at last being extricated from their graves in Catalonia. This is a cause for political controversy. CBC reports.
  • Rapid economic growth in the new, post-Communist, member-states of the European Union is starting to translate into growing political heft, Politico Europe notes.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about a week of her life as a freelance writer, highlighting so much of her work relates to social connections as opposed to actual writing.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares an astonishingly prescient take by E.B. White on the power of television from 1938.
  • Hornet Stories notes the efforts of the Indonesian government to get the Google Play Store there to block 70 apps used by LGBT people.
  • At In a State of Migration, Lyman Stone looks at demographic trends in Hawaii, the other major insular possession of the United States. Low fertility and a high cost of living may actually lead to population decline there, too, in the foreseeable future.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death, at 59, of trailblazing gay comedian Bob Smith.
  • JSTOR Daily links/u> to a paper noting how Jewish resistance in the Warsaw Uprising played a critical role in shaping post-war Jewish identity.
  • Towleroad notes the announcement of an astonishingly preserved 1945 film clip showing gay men, out, at a pool party in 1945 Missouri.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one prominent Donbas separatists’ push for an aggressive response to the Ukrainian government over the collapse of Minsk, including an attempt to reclaim the remainder of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts from Kyiv.

[NEWS] Six GLBTQ links: Quinn Pallister, Ukraine, Poland, Caper in the Castro game, music, voice

  • This Toronto Life Q&A with Quinn Pallister, the Hamilton baker who gained fame baking the world’s gayest cake, is a joy.
  • Politico Europe takes a look at the plight of LGBTQ Ukrainian refugees, particularly exposed to dislocation.
  • VICE takes a look at how queer Poles get by in contemporary Poland.
  • Gamasutra notes the recovery of a very early GLBTQ-themed computer game, the 1989 Caper in the Castro by C.M. Ralph.
  • VICE’s Noisey notes that queer women were very major players in pop music in 2017.
  • First Post shares a personal essay by Aniruddin Mahale talking about his experience with his “gay” voice.

[NEWS] Five links: American gun owners, Japanese inequality, Polish politics, Lexit, #elsagate

  • The small minority of American gun owners who own huge numbers of guns, more than they could seemingly use, is the subject of this study at The Guardian.
  • The Japanese economy may be growing, but so is inequality, Bloomberg reports.
  • This Open Democracy examination of the sharpening political divides in Poland, particularly outside of Warsaw, is gripping. It starts with the self-immolation of Upper Silesian Piotr Szczęsny in his country’s capital.
  • Julian Savarer takes a look at the many problems with “Lexit”, the idea of a left-wing argument for Brexit.
  • James Bridle looks at the complex human and artificial mechanisms behind the production of so much wrong children’s video content. #elsagate is only the tip of it all. Medium hosts the article.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the Earth can easily survive without us.
  • blogTO notes that the Aga Khan Museum recently made an appearance in Star Trek: Discovery, as Vulcan.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the way neutron star collisions and kilonovas can be used to examine physical laws in extreme circumstances.
  • Hornet Stories notes that trans political candidate Danica Roem, in Virginia, is getting lots of positive attention.
  • The LRB Blog visits Gdansk only to find popular anti-Muslim xenophobia thriving.
  • The NYR Daily looks at photographic and other legacies of the Jamaica dancehall scene.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the evolution of SETI from the 1960s to the present.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the struggle of astronomers, in West Texas and elsewhere, to preserve dark skies.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the ways in which GW170817 has confirmed the Standard Model.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that reactionary conservatism in Russia is making that country’s HIV/AIDS epidemic worse.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Charley Ross reports on an unexpected personal involvement in the disappearance of Kori Gossett. Did an informant know?
  • Citizen Science Salon reports, in the time of #sharkweek, on the sevengill sharks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article on the Chinese base in Sudan.
  • Inkfish has a fascinating article describing how New Zealand’s giant black swans went extinct, and were replaced.
  • Language Hat notes two obscure words of Senegalese French, “laptot” and “signare”. What do they mean? Go see.
  • Language Log argues that the influx of English loanwords in Chinese is remarkable. Does it signal future changes in language?
  • Lawyers, Guns Money notes how Los Angeles and southern California were, during the American Civil War, a stronghold of secessionist sentiment, and runs down some of the problems of Mexico, including the militarization of crime.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on what books by which authors tend to get stolen from British bookstores.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that Donald Trump is not likely to be able to substantially reshape NAFTA.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the recent protests in Poland against changes to the Supreme Court.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the structure of the cities of medieval Europe, which apparently were dynamic and flexible.
  • Unicorn Booty shares some classic gay board games.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is going to try to wage a repeat of the Winter War on Ukraine.