A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘politics

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers agriculture in space.
  • Crooked Timber examines the tribalisms which benefit Donald Trump.
  • Dangerous Minds notes an angry New York City television editorial criticizing the Sex Pistols.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the cycles of Mars’ north polar gap.
  • Language Log talks about Chinese script, starting with Ted Chiang’s criticisms.
  • The LRB Blog speculates about the future of a Labour Party that has lost its working-class support.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen likes the Chinese city of Qingdao.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the dispatch of the OSIRIS-REx probe to the launch pad.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders what solution Bernie Sanders is proposing for Puerto Rico.
  • Understanding Society describes sociological frameworks for writing biographies.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates the doping scandal may cost Russia not only the Olympics but FIFA in 2018, and is unsurprised by Gorbachev’s support of the annexation of Crimea.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

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  • Bloomberg reports that Switzerland and the European Union will hold talks on migration after the Brexit referendum.
  • CBC reports that Canada can expect a warmer and dryer summer than average, and looks at the high cost of British Columbia housing (a half-million does not buy much in some parts).
  • MacLean’s has an oral history of Elbowgate.
  • The National Post notes women drivers are signing up for Uber and reports on the exceptional unpopularity of both Clinton and Trump as candidates.
  • Open Democracy argues that the Brexit referendum is nothing but a distraction.

[NEWS] Some Saturday links

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  • Bloomberg notes the difficulties Syrian refugees have with liberal Europe, reports on warnings of dropping property values, and examines Russia’s search for partners in Southeast Asia.
  • Bloomberg View reports on a Russian oligarch who warns of the dangers of oil dependence.
  • CBC warns of a resurgence of sexism if Hillary Clinton gets elected.
  • The Inter Press Service notes the positive things refugees can bring to the cities where they are resettled.
  • The National Post reports a claim that an Argentine lawyer who was investigating a terrorist bombing in Buenos Aires was forced to kill himself.
  • Reuters notes Oklahoma legislators who want to impeach Obama over trans rights.
  • The Toronto Star notes the imminent installation of a tidal power turbine on the Bay of Fundy.
  • Wired looks at IKEA’s indoor farming kit and defends Los Angeles’ new metro line.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond considers the floating mountains of Pluto.
  • The Boston Globe‘s Big Picture notes the story of a church that transitioned from an old-style church building to a storefront.
  • blogTO shares a photo of the Gardiner Expressway, closed for construction.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the search for life around red giant stars.
  • Crooked Timber criticizes left-wing Brexit proponents for the contradictions in their politics.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at mountain-building on Io.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas wonders if the kids are all right in an age of ubiquitous technology.
  • The LRB Blog notes Trump’s acceptance by Fox.
  • Otto Pohl shares a list of his articles dealing with the Crimean Tatars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines air pollution and car traffic in Mexico City.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the political popularity of Sufis in Dagestan.
  • Arnold Zwicky celebrates actor Joe Dallesandro.

[URBAN NOTE] “How Toronto’s Newly Proposed Wards Will Shake Up the City”

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A graphics-heavy post at Torontoist by Sean Marshall looks at how new wards in Toronto will alter the city’s politics.

Despite major population growth, concentrated in only a few parts of the city, Toronto’s ward boundaries have not changed since 2000, when the number of city councillors was chopped from 56 to 44. Sixteen year later, councillors in downtown Toronto and central North York are overworked. Not only must they represent a disproportionately larger population, they must keep track of numerous building applications, support more local business improvement areas, and work through great neighbourhood change. Wards 20, 23, 27, and 42 are the most underrepresented at City Hall; Ward 42 includes the new Morningside Heights neighbourhood, while condominium construction have swollen the number of residents in Wards 20, 23, and 27.

Consultants retained by the City of Toronto have been tasked with reviewing the size and shape of Toronto’s wards, and providing a recommendation for new ward boundaries that will take effect in time for the 2018 municipal election. Back in August 2015, the Toronto Ward Boundary Review Options Report was released. This month, after consultations at public meetings and with sitting councillors, the consultants are recommending 47 wards, up from the current 44. The final report’s recommendation, released on May 16, is similar to the “Minimal Change” option in last August’s report, but there have been some minor tweaks to the ward boundaries. Each new ward will have an average population of 61,000, with a range between 51,800 and 72,000 (+/- 15%).

There’s much more at Torontoist.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 20, 2016 at 10:15 pm

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Bloomberg looks at Argentina’s push for renewable energy, reports on Rosatom’s interest in developing South Africa as an entry into the African nuclear market, writes about China’s opposition to anything remotely like separatism in Hong Kong, and looks at Poland’s demand for an apology for Bill Clinton critical of the new government.
  • Bloomberg View notes the importance of honest statistics in Brazil, and calls for American arms sales to a friendly Vietnam.
  • CBC notes new Conservative support for a transgender rights bill and reports on how Ontario’s climate policy will hit Alberta’s natural gas exports.
  • Gizmodo notes Portugal has just managed to power itself entirely on renewable energy for four days.
  • The Inter Press Service describes the Middle Eastern refugee crisis.
  • The National Post looks at a proposed New York State ban on declawing cats.
  • Open Democracy reports on Norway’s EU status via a left-leaning Norwegian, looks at the life of Daniel Berrigan, and notes the emergent Saudi-Indian alliance.
  • Universe Today describes the circumstellar habitable zones of red giants.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO notes this weekend is going to be warm.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at moons of the dwarf planets in the Kuiper belt.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some photos of American malls taken in the late 1980s.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a white dwarf that stole so much matter from its stellar partner to make it a brown dwarf.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes Greenland may not have been particularly warm when the Vikings came.
  • Language Hat tells the story of one solitary person who decided to learn Korean.
  • Language Log writes about Sinitic languages written in phonetic scripts.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map showing how New Orleans is sinking.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests Brexit is not a good strategy, even in the hypothetical case of a collapsing EU. Why not just wait for the collapse?
  • The New APPS Blog notes with concern the expansion of Elsevier.
  • The NYRB Daily notes the perennial divisions among the Kurds.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders what’s wrong with Bernie Sanders.
  • Towleroad looks at the impending decriminalization of gay sex in the Seychelles.
  • Understanding Society looks at the work of Brankovich in understanding global inequality.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars are no longer alone in remembering 1944, and looks at the unhappiness of Tuva’s shrinking Russophone minority.
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