A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘politics

[ISL] Four #PEI links: Lupins, politics, elections, Pride

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  • CBC Prince Edward Island looks at the famous lupins of Prince Edward Island, here.
  • There were mixed emotions, CBC Prince Edward Island reports, as non-residents of the Abegweit First Nation at Scotchfort were allowed to vote in band elections for the first time.
  • Politicians report that, notwithstanding the lack of a formal agreement, right now it looks as if the minority Conservative government could last until 2023. CBC PEI has it.
  • The raising of the pride flag in Charlottetown follows reports of homophobia outside of the capital, as small towns like Alberton refused requests. The Guardian reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Eight Toronto links: neighbourhoods, housing, mass transit, Great Lakes

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  • I do agree with the argument of Emma Teitel in the Toronto Star that, between the east and the west of Toronto, the west is the more snobbish. (West-ender, here.)
  • blogTO notes that home prices in Toronto are ridiculously out of the reach of average millennials.
  • Is multi-generational housing the solution to the housing shortage in Toronto? The Toronto Star reports.
  • Toronto Life profiles</u. the photos taken by Jesse Colin Jackson of the now-demolished Regent Park building of 14 Blevins Place.
  • The story of the terrible, expensive architectural problems with the TTC’s Pioneer Village station is appalling. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Steve Munro notes how the TTC is decidedly unhappy with the failings of Presto.
  • Christian Mittelstaedt writes at NOW Toronto about how the flooding of the Toronto Islands this year can be traced, in part, to problems with how Canada and the United States jointly manage the Great Lakes.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait considers the question of where, exactly, the dwarf galaxy Segue-1 came from.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the import of sodium chloride for the water oceans of Europa, and for what they might hold.
  • D-Brief wonders if dark matter punched a hole in the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • JSTOR Daily warns that the increasing number of satellites in orbit of Earth might hinder our appreciation of the night sky.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the complications of democracy and politics in Mauritania.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders about the nature of an apparently very decentralized city of Haifa.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There notes that, while our knowledge of the Big Bang is certainly imperfect, the odds of it being wrong are quite, quite low.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the Hayabusa 2 exploration of asteroid Ryugu.
  • Vintage Space examines how Apollo astronauts successfully navigated their way to the Moon.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at press discussion in Russia around the decriminalization of soft drugs like marijuana.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at a comic depicting a “mememobile.”

[ISL] Five #PEI links: Airbnb, Charlottetown Mall, Crapaud, Région Évangéline, seaweed pie

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  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes the proportionally extreme impact of Airbnb on the very tight housing market in Charlottetown.
  • The Guardian notes the redevelopment of the Charlottetown Mall will see new stores and several hundred new housing units.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on his successful electronic mapping of every building in the community of Crapaud.
  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes that a move to amalgamate the predominantly Francophone and Acadian west-end Région Évangéline into a single municipality has halted.
  • Atlas Obscura reports on the PEI dish of seaweed pie, made from Irish moss, once in the community of Miminegash and now available at the Canadian Potato Museum in O’Leary.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the recent study of near-Earth asteroid 1999 KW4, looking at it from the perspective of defending the Earth and building a civilization in space.
  • Ingrid Robeyns at Crooked Timber continues a debate on universal basic income.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers if India does need its own military space force.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how foster care in the United States (Canada, too, I’d add) was also synonymous with sending children off as unpaid farm labourers.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a proposal, linking immigration to high-income countries to the idea of immigration as reparation for colonialism.
  • The LRB Blog considers the ever-growing presence of the dead on networks like Facebook.
  • Muhammad Idrees Ahmad at the NYR Daily looks at how Bellingcat and other online agencies have transformed investigative journalism.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a speech by the head of the Bank of Japan talking about the interactions of demographic change and economic growth.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the mystery behind the great mass of early black hole J1342+0928.
  • Strange Company looks at the unsolved Christmas 1928 disappearance of young Melvin Horst from Orrville, Ohio. What happened?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Uzbekistan is moving the Latin script for Uzbek into closer conformity with its Turkish model.

[NEWS] 15 links about Canada and Canadian politics (#cdnpoli)

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  • Scott Gilmore at MacLean’s notes how, in the United States, Canada as a model is a common idea among Democrats.
  • David Camfield argues at The Conversation that the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike offers lessons for Canadians now.
  • Le Devoir notes the recent argument of now-Québec premier François Legault that a Québec that was, like Ontario, a relatively wealthy province would be a Québec that would have fewer tensions with the rest of Canada. Is this plausible?
  • Éric Grenier notes at CBC that, in Ontario, Andrew Scheer’s federal conservatives will need to draw voters from beyond Ford Nation.
  • MacLean’s hosts the arguments of Frank Graves and Michael Valpy that Canadian politicians are not paying nearly the amount of attention to economic inequality that Canadians think they should.
  • MacLean’s makes the point that Conrad Black seems to see much to like in Donald Trump.
  • Ontario and the Canadian government are fighting over funding for the proposed Ontario Line, the Canadian government insisting it needs more information about the route. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Facebook, it turns out, chose not to pay proper attention to sending officials to testify at a Canada government inquiry into fake news. Maclean’s reports.
  • Justin Trudeau, speaking recently in Toronto, credited immigration for the success of the tech sector of Canada. CBC reports.
  • Foreign workers turn out to play a critical role in staffing the lobster plants in the Acadian fishing village of Meteghan, in Nova Scotia. CBC reports.
  • Canada and the United States are again disputing the claims of Canada to sovereignty over the Northwest Passage. Global News reports.
  • MacLean’s interviews Northwest Territories premier Bob McLeod, who dreams of a massive development of Arctic Canada, including a goal of a million residents for his territory.
  • Enzo DiMatteo suggests at NOW Toronto that the growing unpopularity of Doing Ford in Ontario might hurt the federal Conservatives badly.
  • Could the Green Party go mainstream across Canada? The Conversation considers.
  • The Conversation reports on what the national fervour over the Toronto Raptors represents, including the growing diversity of the population of Canada and the global spread of basketball.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul looks at some architecturally innovative pools.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Wolf 359, a star made famous in Star Trek for the Starfleet battle there against the Borg but also a noteworthy red dwarf star in its own right.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how the NASA Deep Space Atomic Clock will play a vital role in interplanetary navigation.
  • The Crux considers the “drunken monkey” thesis, the idea that drinking alcohol might have been an evolutionary asset for early hominids.
  • D-Brief reports on what may be the next step for genetic engineering beyond CRISPR.
  • Bruce Dorminey looks at how artificial intelligence may play a key role in searching for threat asteroids.
  • The Island Review shares some poetry from Roseanne Watt, inspired by the Shetlands and using its dialect.
  • Livia Gershon writes at JSTOR Daily about how YouTube, by promising to make work fun, actually also makes fun work in psychologically problematic ways.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how the relatively small Taiwan has become a financial superpower.
  • Janine di Giovanni at the NYR Daily looks back at the 2000 intervention in Sierra Leone. Why did it work?
  • Jamais Cascio at Open the Future looks back at a 2004 futurological exercise, the rather accurate Participatory Panopticon. What did he anticipate correctly? How? What does it suggest for us now to our world?
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that LightSail 2 will launch before the end of June.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how the discovery of gas between galaxies helps solve a dark matter question.
  • Strange Company shares a broad collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia makes the obvious observation that the West prefers a North Caucasus controlled by Russia to one controlled by Islamists.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at American diner culture, including American Chinese food.