A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular culture

[NEWS] Five GLBTQ links: gay Toronto musicians, Roy Moore, police, churches, Pride Toronto

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  • The Huffington Post has a nice list of some of the more high-profile LGBTQ musicians in Toronto from the 1960s on.
  • The virulent homophobia reported of Roy Moore’s supporters is upsetting, but not surprising. Global News reports.
  • While it is nice that Church and Wellesley is getting four dedicated neighbourhood police officers, some wonder whether these resources could be better spent elsewhere, in mental health for instance. Daily Xtra reports.
  • VICE reports on a new app, Church Clarity, intended to help queer people find queer-friendly churches.
  • The deficit of a half-million dollars reported by Pride Toronto, revenues dropping perhaps a consequence of last year’s controversies, is obviously not good. The Toronto Star reports.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about change: U of T, Wexford Plaza, Parkdale, Metro, French immersion

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  • Universiy of Toronto contract staff have voted overwhelmingly for a strike mandate. CBC reports.
  • Wexford Plaza, an independent film centered around shopping guards at the Scarborough mall of the same name, has done well in Los Angeles and is set to open here in Toronto. blogTO reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes a protest by Parkdale residents for affordable housing at King and Dufferin, where a massive new development is expected to rise.
  • In response to the new $15 minimum wage, Metro is cutting service hours at some of its 23-hour grocery stores. blogTO reports.
  • I sincerely hope that staffing shortages will not lead the TDSB to cut French immersion from its list of programs. The Toronto Star reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes that the opioid epidemic seems to be hitting baby boomers and millennials worst, of all major American demographics.
  • Hornet Stories shares one timetable for new DC films following Justice League.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a case brought by a Romanian before the European Court of Justice regarding citizenship rights for his American spouse. This could have broad implications for the recognition of same-sex couples across the EU, not just its member-states.
  • Language Hat reports on a journalist’s search for a village in India where Sanskrit, ancient liturgical language of Hinduism, remains the vernacular.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a review of an intriuging new book, Nowherelands, looking at ephemeral countries in the 1840-1975 era.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the textile art of Anni Albers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the navigational skills of the Polynesians, and their reflection in Moana.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the widespread jubilation in Zimbabwe following the overthrow of Mugabe.
  • Rocky Planet notes that Öræfajökull, the largest volcano in Iceland if a hidden one, has been showing worrying signs of potential eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on House Guests, an art installation that has taken over an entire house at Dundas and Ossington.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the story of how the quantum property of spin was discovered.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests new Russian policies largely excluding non-Russian languages from education are causing significant problems, even ethnic conflict.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers music as a trigger of emotional memory, generally and in his own life.

[NEWS] Three Justice League notes: box office, shared universe, Ezra Miller

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  • I have to say that the argument of Steven Zeitchik that DC Comics may not be able to sustain its shared universe, given the apparent underperformance of Justice League, is not obviously wrong. I do think DC is now getting it, mind. His article is hosted at the Toronto Star.
  • Scott Mendelson argues that, if Justice League performs well enough later on and/or internationally, the film could still be viewed as a worthwhile investment in the individual characters and later films. Tis article is over at Forbes.
  • Pop Sugar notes that Ezra Miller, fresh from an excellent performance in Justice League as the Flash, is set to become the first out queer actor to headline an action film.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 22, 2017 at 11:59 pm

[NEWS] Five links on science, culture: blue whales, Hedy Lamarr, telecom, infrastructure, misogyny

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  • Apparently 80% of blue whales are left-handed. National Geographic reports.
  • The FCC has just stopped support for a program that subsidizes vital telecommunications for, among other groups, Native Americans. VICE reports.
  • Between political challenges and problems with construction, major infrastructure projects are failing to meet their goals at a noteworthy rate. National Geographic reports.
  • VICE recounts the story of Hedy Lamarr, noteworthy actor and brilliant scientist, from the perspective of a documentary noting how misogyny kept her from employing her talents to the fullest.
  • This Claire Dederer article in The Paris Review, talking about the works of monstrous men can (or should?) be salvaged from the legacies of their creators, is tremendously important.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • James Bow notes, by way of explaining new fiction he is writing, why a Mercury colony makes sense.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the life of Anita Brenner, a Mexican-born American Jewish writer who helped connect the two North American neighbours.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes the cautious approach of the United States towards famine relief in the young Soviet Union in 1922.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares a brief Lewis Mumford quote, talking about how men became mechanical in spirit before they invented complex machines.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the many ways in which the movie Addams Family Values is queer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the idea of what “thoughtfulness” means in relation to Senator Al Franken.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few more fantasy map generators.
  • The NYR Daily considers the thoughtful stamp art of Vincent Sardon.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell recommends Adam Rutherford’s new book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, on genomics and history.
  • Towleroad notes that Demi Levato took trans Virginian politician Danica Roem her to the American Music Awards.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Tatar cleric’s speculation that Russia’s undermining of the Tatar language in education might push Tatars away from Russia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of Ross 128 b, a nearby exoplanet that looks like it actually might be plausibly very Earth-like.
  • blogTO notes that, after a decade, the east entrance of the Royal Ontario Museum is finally going to be an entrance again.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the importance of self-care, of making time to experience pleasure.
  • Crooked Timber shares some of the 1871 etchings of Gustave Doré, fresh from the Paris Commune.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how one man’s collection of old tin cans tells a remarkable story about the settlement of the United States.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a vintage 1980 television report on the Los Angeles punk scene.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a recent study of chemical abundances around Kronos and Krios, two very similar stars near each other, these abundances suggesting they are just forming planetary systems.
  • Gizmodo shares a revealing new table of exoplanets, one that brings out all sorts of interesting patterns and types.
  • Hornet Stories notes Courtney Love’s efforts to fundraise for LGBTQ homeless youth.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Margaret Court, an Australian tennis star now more famous for her homophobia, called for Australia to ignore the postal vote for marriage equality.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Trump’s Russian links are important to explore, not least because they reveal the spreading influence of kleptocracy.
  • Lingua Franca shares a perhaps over-stereotypical take on languages being caught between drives for purity and for diversity.
  • The LRB Blog notes the murder of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cácares.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interesting collection of links to future and alternate-history mass transit maps of Melbourne.
  • The NYR Daily links to an interesting exhibit about disposable fashion like the simple T-shirt.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a remarkable performance of a Beatles song in the hill country of West Bengal.