A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular culture

[NEWS] Four pop culture links: Moana and Maori pride, gay bookstores, a fake German beach, gay Trek

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  • io9 has an interesting article looking at how the success of Disney’s film Moana is driving Maori pride in New Zealand.
  • New Now Next lists eight of the top LGBTQ bookstores of North America and Europe, including Toronto’s Glad Day.
  • 24 hours on an artificial beach, sheltered under a hanger deep in east Germany, turns out to be quite fulfilling. VICE reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes that Star Trek: Discovery is a belated attempt to catch up with LGBTQ presence in pop culture.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.
  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of “The Ballad of the Green Berets”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.
  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans’ habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, “My Immortal”, has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)
  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.
  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry’s Auroville Café.
  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.
  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.
  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes’ analysis of Forbidden Planet.
  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.
  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas–hence, new sources of economic growth–are harder to come by.
  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.
  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia’s Asian territories.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Acts of Minor Treason’s Andrew Barton reacts to the series premiere of Orville, finding it oddly retrograde and unoriginal.
  • Centauri Dreams shares Larry Klaes’ article considering the impact of the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet on science and science fiction alike.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper wondering if it is by chance that Earth orbits a yellow dwarf, not a dimmer star.
  • Drone360 shares a stunning video of a drone flying into Hurricane Irma.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the 10th anniversary of Chris Crocker’s “Leave Britney Alone!” video. (It was important.)
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if 16 years are long enough to let people move beyond taboo images, like those of the jumpers.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the young Dreamers, students, who have been left scrambling by the repeal of DACA.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how a Québec plan to name islands in the north created by hydro flooding after literature got complicated by issues of ethnicity and language.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the rise of internal tourism in China, and soon, of Chinese tourists in the wider world.
  • The NYR Daily has an interview arguing that the tendency to make consciousness aphysical or inexplicable is harmful to proper study.
  • Roads and Kingdoms has a brief account of a good experience with Indonesian wine.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell links to five reports about Syria. They are grim reading.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence’s introduction into our civilization to be managed.
  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.
  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.
  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.
  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada’s space future by the Space Advisory Board.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.