A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular culture

[MUSIC] Five music links: Tom Lehrer, Toronto hip-hop, TTC music, Ladytron, Eurythmics

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  • This Nature feature on the musics of the brilliant satirist Tom Lehrer is a must-read.
  • Lidia Abraha argues at NOW Toronto that more investment needs to be directed towards the burgeoning hip-hop talent of the city.
  • Transit Toronto notes that auditions for the next crop of musicians licensed for TTC stations are now ongoing.
  • Ladytron is back, Noisey notes, with a new video for their new single “The Animals”.
  • This article in The Independent interviewing Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox about their joint musical achievements in the Eurythmics, as their albums are set to be reissued on vinyl, makes me want to buy a record player.
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Written by Randy McDonald

April 12, 2018 at 10:30 pm

[NEWS] Five Canadian culture links: Diverse churches, First Nations Winnipeg, Tim Horton’s, gender

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  • CTV News U>reports on how established churches in Canada, facing falling attendance, are trying to reach out to new demographics.
  • The South China Morning Post reports on how Winnipeg is striving to include and represent First Nations cultures, here.
  • In the wake of its foreign buyout and the bad publicity after Ontario’s minimum wage increase, Tim Horton’s reputation among Canadians–especially as a Canadian community–seems shot. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Robyn Doolittle wonders why, in an upcoming movie inspired by the Rob Ford saga, the role based on her of a journalist whose research blew the scandal open is going to be played by a male actor. (Rightfully so, I think.) The National Post has it.
  • Michelle Da Silva interviews a collection of men (and others) about their perceptions of masculinity in the era of #metoo, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Five cities links: Peel Region, Montréal, Ontario Cannabis Store, Homewood, London

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  • Chris Rattan argues at NOW Toronto that Peel Region should stop its school resource officer program, embedding cops in schools.
  • Montréal mayor Valérie Plante wants to make homebuying more affordable for locals in her city. The Montreal Gazette reports.
  • The first four outposts of the Ontario Cannabis Store chain will be in Toronto, Kingston, Guelph, and Thunder Bay. The Toronto Star reports.
  • CityLab reports on how the Chicagoland community of Homewood is using comics to market itself to millennial homeseekers, here.
  • Why is the homicide rate in London so high? Problems in crime-fighting, including policing and crime prevention both, need to be dealt with. Bloomberg View reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: Meadoway Park, terracotta home, Ontario Place, Jollibee, Maple Leafs

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  • CBC reports on the impending creation of the Meadoway Park, a substantial corridor stretching from the Don Valley northeast to the Rouge River.
  • Samantha Edwards at NOW Toronto shares some more cool facts about the Meadoway Park, with 40% of its projected cost of $C 85 million already funded.
  • I am quite interested in seeing this west-end Toronto home with terracotta tiles for myself. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Toronto Guardian has shared some lovely vintage photographs of Ontario Place back at its height, here.
  • This NOW Toronto guide to the offerings of Jollibee makes me interested, and perhaps a bit hungry.
  • Edward Keenan writes movingly about how he and his deal with being a Toronto Maple Leafs Fan at playoff time. (As someone not born in Toronto, I think this city deserves better of its teams. Just saying.) The Toronto Star has it.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes that global climate change seems already to have altered the flow of the ocean current system including the Gulf Stream.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the dialect, and cultural forms, of American loggers.
  • Taika Waititi, director of (among other movies) Thor: Ragnarok, has created controversy by talking about racism in his native New Zealand. (Good for him, I’d say.) Lawyers, Guns and Money reports.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at a strange public apology by a Chinese company, and what this says about Chinese politics.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shared this map depicting the many ephemeral states that appeared in the former Russian Empire after the October Revolution.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that there are very good reasons to believe in dark matter and dark energy, that these concepts are not just a latter-day version of the aether.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the many ways in which the Siberian republic of Tuva is a political anomaly in Russia.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley uses data from the National Graduates Survey to take a look at student regret in Canadian universities. To what extent does it exist? What disciplines is it concentrated in?

[NEWS] Five sci-fi links: HAL 9000, Space Seed on VHS, baseball on DS9, Civilization, AIs doing D&D

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  • How did the movie version of HAL 9000, from 2001, come about? And why does HAL sound so Canadian? The National Post reports.
  • The official Star Trek website explains how the release of the episode “Space Seed” on VHS helped change the videocassette market of the 1980s, here.
  • Deadspin explains how the central role played by the sport of baseball in Deep Space 9 underlined the ways in which that show was atypical Trek.
  • Rock Paper Shotgun examines how many long-run civilization-building games, like Civilization, do a poor job of depicting stagnation and decline, and what this failure says about us now.
  • The idea that the game that artificial intelligences need to learn to play is not chess but D&D–that games involving roleplaying are good tests for general intelligence–seems obvious to me. Aeon has it.

[NEWS] Five LGBT links: Village killings of the 1970s, Grindr, Fire Island, Steve Rogers’ Brooklyn

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  • This long-form CBC article on a string of unsolved murders of gay men in the late 1970s is compelling, frightening reading.
  • Daily Xtra recently shared a Body Politic article from the 1970s by the late great Robin Hardy on the mysterious killings of gay men at the time. (Visibility, as Hardy suggests, can save lives.)
  • The suggestion that excessive dependency on Grindr and similar apps is not helping queer men form rewarding relationships does not sound inherently implausible to me. Vox has it.
  • Hornet Stories shares a guide to Fire Island, here.
  • Things With Wings looks at the history of New York City and Brooklyn and finds out that the neighbourhood where Steven Rogers lived in the 1930s and 1940s, Brooklyn Heights, was actually a mecca of out queer people and communities.