A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular literature

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Martin Duberman, far right, activism, Andrew Holleran, Obergefell

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  • Masha Gessen at The New Yorker reports on the arguments of American queer historian Martin Duberman about mistakes that gay rights movement has made.
  • Arshy Mann at Daily Xtra reports on how, in Russia and Poland and Hungary and now Brazil, homophobia is being used as a mobilizing tool by the far right.
  • Them reports on a study suggesting LGBTQ people are twenty times as likely to be social activists as cishets. (The overall rates, though, are still low.)
  • Mike Miksche writes at Them about the genesis of the famous Andrew Holleran novel Dancer from the Dance and its impact.
  • Jonathan Adler at the Volokh Conspiracy points to a compelling argument at the Wall Street Journal why the Obergefell decision legalizing gay marriage nation-wide in the United States will not be revisited. (I hope.)
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[NEWS] Five science fiction links: Catherynne Valente, Babylon 5, Star Wars, Janelle Monáe, numbers

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  • Lawyers, Guns and Money recently took a look at the way the great author Catherynne M. Valente made use of culture as a force in her briliant Space Opera.
  • I quite enjoyed this oral history of Babylon 5, over at Syfy.
  • MEL Magazine hosts this great article arguing the strength of The Last Jedi is that it does not give in to the wishes of fans.
  • Vox’s exploration of the Afrofuturism of Janelle Monáe’s work really laid out these influences on her for me.
  • James Nicoll recently asked an interesting question at Tor: Where is all the science fiction dealing with depopulation, with population decline?

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes a new study examining the evolution of giant planets.
  • Cody Delistraty has a nice essay about the power of coincidence in the human mind.
  • Dead Things reports on the possible discovery of hominin remains in China dating from 2.2 million years ago.
  • Language Hat notes the discovery of an ancient tablet in Greece dating from the 3rd century CE containing the earliest extract of The Odyssey so far found.
  • Language Log notes the importance of the language skills of a multilingual teen in leading to the rescue of the boys trapped in a Thai cave.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution imagines what friendship would be like in a world of telepathy.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis shares images taken by the Hayabusa2 probe of the asteroid Ryugu.
  • At Spacing, John Lorinc notes how the Ford government’s opposition to the clean energy policies of Wynne may well lead to the return of noticeable air pollution.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on Russian government actions intended to suppress what seems to be the spectre of separatism in Kaliningrad.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthro{dendum}’s Adam Fish looks at the phenomenon of permissionless innovation as part of a call for better regulation.
  • James Bow shares excerpts from his latest book, The Cloud Riders.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how data from Voyager 1’s cosmic ray detectors has been used to study dark matter.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money begins a dissection of what Roe vs Wade meant, and means, for abortion in the United States, and what its overturn might do.
  • Ilan Stavans, writing for Lingua Franca at the Chronicle, considers the languages of the World Cup. The prominence of Spanish in the United States is particularly notable.
  • The LRB Blog gathers together articles referencing the now-departed Boris Johnson. What a man.
  • The Map Room Blog reports/u> on Matthew Blackett’s remarkably intricate transit map of Canada.
  • Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution links to a study from Nature exploring how shifts in the definition of concepts like racism and sexism means that, even as many of the grossest forms disappear, racism and sexism continue to be recognized if in more minute form.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how a Japanese experiment aimed at measuring proton decay ended up inaugurating the era of neutrino astronomy, thanks to SN1987A.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on how a Russian proposal to resettle Afrikaner farmers from South Africa to the North Caucasus (!) is, unsurprisingly, meeting with resistance from local populations, including non-Russian ones.
  • Linguist Arnold Zwicky takes a look at how, exactly, one learns to use the F word.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy notes the discovery of a distant exoplanet, orbiting subgiant EPIC248847494, with an orbit ten years long.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the latest discoveries regarding Ceres’ Occator Crater, a place with a cryovolcanic past.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a brilliant early galaxy, the brightest so far found, P352-15.
  • Dangerous Minds shares an extended interview with Françoise Hardy.
  • Far Outliers notes how, during the later Cold War, cash-desperate Soviet bloc governments allowed hopeful emigrants for countries in the West to depart only if these governments paid a ransom for them.
  • Hornet Stories has a nice feature on Enemies of Dorothy, a LGBT sketch comedy group with a political edge. I saw some of their clips; I’m following them.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at some of the features uniting celebratory music festival Coachella with Saturnalia, fitting the former into an ancient tradition.
  • Language Hat reports on researchers studying the development of emojis. Are they becoming components of a communications system with stable meanings?
  • Marginal Revolution reports on how mobile money is becoming a dominant element in the economy of Somaliland.
  • Justine Petrone at North reports on the things that were, and were not, revealed about his family’s ancestry through DNA testing.
  • Melissa Chadburn writes at the NYR Daily about the food she ate growing up as a poor child, and its meaning for her then and now in a time of growing inequality.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a woman’s experience drinking samsu, a clear rice liqueur, in Malacca.
  • Drew Rowsome raves over David Kingston Yeh’s debut novel, the queer Toronto-themed The Boy at the Edge of the World.
  • Window on Eurasia quotes a Russian observer who suggests that Trump’s attempt to disrupt the European Union, even if successful, might simply help make Germany into a strategic competitor to the United States (with benefits for other powers).

[WRITING] Five links on writing and reading

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  • JSTOR Daily talks about the lending libraries that women like Lizzie Bennet made use of in Georgian England.
  • Jacobin notes the economic argument for providing artists with basic income.
  • How are romance writers responding to the age of Trump? CBC reports.
  • How much is a word worth? This article looks at the history and the arguments. The article is at Medium.
  • We need better storytelling in order to make sense of, and repair, the world. Sujatha Fernandes at Open Democracy writes.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 9, 2018 at 9:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the concept of the “Clarke exobelt”, a hypothetical ring of space stations in synchronous orbit of a planet that might be detectable across interstellar distances.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the new American phenomenon of millennials moving back home with their parents.
  • Far Outliers shares the second part of an an article summary on African and Japanese interactions in early modern Asia.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at “precisionism”, an art movement in the early 20th century United States that looked to the machine for inspiration.
  • Language Hat shares a poem by the late great Ursula K Le Guin, “Dead Languages.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money, looking at the anti-Uighur police state that China has established in Xinjiang, points out that there are many ways in which American hegemony can be followed by something worse.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how many documents vital in understanding the history of Iraq have been removed from the country or destroyed altogether. How will Iraqis be able to understand their history without them?
  • The New APPS Blog takes a look at a newly released Foucault lecture from 1978, “Analytic Philosophy of Politics”.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports from Mars, enveloped by a planet-wide dust storm that might endanger the intrepid rovers.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at an exciting new film biography of Vivienne Westwood.
  • Strange Company tells a story of a 19th century insurance fraud rooted in murder.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares an old tourist map of Maine noting how many placenames from around the world are in that state.
  • Towleroad shares a lovely ad from Ireland’s Dublin Bus company featuring fathers picking up their gay children to take them to Pride. Wow.