A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular literature

[NEWS] Four science and technology links: LIGO, Neanderthal genes, Kazuo Ishiguro, AI gods

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  • I bet that, as numerous reports have indicated, LIGO picked up a neutron star collision, with EM traces. D-Brief reports.
  • Neanderthal genes seem to have had a big influence on modern human health. I would be surprised not to have some. National Geographic describes.
  • Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go may evoke crises of bioethics, but I’m not sure it relates to genetic engineering. VICE reports.
  • These apocalyptic visions of technophiles who want to create an artificial intelligence to become god are notable. The Guardian takes a look.
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[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Metropolitan Community Church, Jeff Rock, PFLAG China, Indian lit, Satanism

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  • Hornet Stories looks at the long history of the explicitly LGBTQ-friendly Metropolitan Community Church.
  • Jeff Rock will be the new pastor of Toronto’s Metropolitan Community Church congregation, after Brent Hawkes. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Quartz reports on a PFLAG China cruise, featuring queer people and their parents.
  • Little India reports on the emerging field of gay literature in India, prose and poetry, fiction and non-fiction.
  • The Satanic Temple of Seattle is commissioning anti-gay bakers to bake them pro-Satanism cakes. Religious freedom, right? Bustle tells the story.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes that the analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton from Croatia reveals much common ancestry.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno probe.
  • Crooked Timber considers the differences–such as they are–between science fiction and fantasy literature.
  • After a conversation with Adam Gopnik, Cody Delistraty makes a case for the importance of high-brow culture.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper arguing that Earth-like planets can exist even without active plate tectonics.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that operating systems relying on instinct hurt human thought.
  • Language Log considers Twitter post limits for East Asian languages.
  • The LRB Blog considers trench fever and the future of nursing in the United Kingdom.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study suggesting people actively look out for bad and threatening news items.
  • The NYR Daily examines the reasons why Uber ended up getting banned by the city of London.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on an exciting new staging at the Paramount Theatre of Salt-Water Moon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the very low proportion of planets in studied exosystems actually detected by Kepler.
  • Strange Company tells the story of John Banvard, a 19th century American who lost everything in mounting panorama exhibitions.
  • Towleroad reports on how PREP contributed to an 80% fall in new HIV diagnoses in London and wider England.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the worsening of HIV/AIDS in Russia, aided by terrible government policy and bad statistics.

[NEWS] Four links about LGBTQ culture: Pansy Craze, drag in Toronto, Michael Sharkey, Matt Cain

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  • This article looks at the amazing queer parties that were major nightlife features in the 1930s US. The Guardian reports.
  • City News looks at how drag queens are becoming high-demand performers in RuPaul-era Toronto.
  • Ruth La Ferla shares a stunning contemporary photo exhibit by Michael Sharkey of the fashion of out queer youths. The New York Times reports.
  • A new gay-themed novel by Matt Cain is going to get crowdfunded after being rejected by traditional publisher as “too gay”. The Guardian reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 6, 2017 at 8:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes that the most plausible explanation for Tabitha’s Star, KIC 8462852, exists in partial eclipses of the star by dust clouds.
  • D-Brief notes that the giant stick insects of Lord Howe Island did survive in their forced diaspora.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze takes a look at Kelt-9b, a planet so close to its star that it is literally melting away.
  • Language Hat looks at a website set up by inhabitants of the Faroe Islands to translate Faroese.
  • The LRB Blog shares some of the past appearances of Nobel-winning author Kazuo Ishiguro in the pages of the LRB.
  • Neal Ascherson at the NYR Daily looks at the mechanism of the referendum, in Scotland and Catalonia and elsewhere.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the import of Mike Pence’s promise to send Americans to the Moon again.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how the cosmic phenomenon of inflation explains the entire modern universe.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Chechnya’s Ramzan Kadyrov is trying to establish himself as a Russian political figure.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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io9 looks at the surprising things we are continuing to learn from Tycho’s supernova, SN 1572. https://gizmodo.com/a-famous-supernovas-mysteries-are-still-unraveling-hund-1818816208

Anthrodendum has a thoughtful interview between two anthropologists about their experiences as ethnographers. https://savageminds.org/2017/09/25/explaining-ethnography-in-the-field-a-conversation-between-pasang-yangjee-sherpa-and-carole-mcgranahan/

Centauri Dreams reports on the LIGO/VIRGO detection of gravitational wave #GW170814 https://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=38557
D-Brief also notes the detection of #GW170814 http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2017/09/27/gravitational-wave-virgo/
as does Starts With A Bang https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/09/27/ligo-virgo-detects-the-first-three-detector-gravitational-wave/

The Crux notes how ancient rocks on the Québec-Labrador frontier have preserved traces of very early life. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2017/09/27/earth-oldest-rocks-life/

D-Brief notes the potential discovery of a biomarker for CTE, something that may well help professional athletes. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2017/09/27/cte-biomarker/

Dangerous Minds looks at the time the Pet Shop Boys and Liza Minelli collaborated on an album. http://dangerousminds.net/comments/results_when_the_pet_shop_boys_met_liza_minnelli

The Dragon’s Gaze looks at evidence that a sub-Saturn gas giant is forming around T Tauri star TW Hydrae. http://thedragonsgaze.blogspot.ca/2017/09/tw-hydrae-is-forming-subsaturn-gas-giant.html

Hornet Stories looks at the four lessons a professor took from gay porn, about sexuality and its representation. https://hornetapp.com/stories/gay-porn-professor/

Language Log looks at how Joseon Korea once used the wrong Chinese dialect to talk officially to China. http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=34693

Lawyers, Guns and Money notes an odd defense of Hugh Hefner by a conservative. http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2017/09/hugh-hefner-good-now

The LRB Blog notes the oddly convention nature of Hugh Hefner. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2017/09/28/august-kleinzahler/the-conventional-mr-hefner/

The Map Room Blog argues that faults found with fantasy maps actually reflect deeper issues with fantasy literature. http://www.maproomblog.com/2017/09/the-territory-is-not-the-map/

Marginal Revolution notes that IBM employs more people In India than in the United States.
http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2017/09/india-fact-day-3.html

The NYR Daily notes a new art exhibition of work by Peter Saul dealing with Trump. http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2017/09/27/a-carnival-of-desecration-peter-saul-trump/

The Planetary Society Blog notes the Earth pictures taken by the OSIRIS-REx probe. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2017/0928-earth-flyby-osiris-rex.html

The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes a worrying new analysis justifying an American strike on North Korea, despite Seoul. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2017/09/the-hawks-make-their-case-to-fight-north-korea.html

Drew Rowsome notes an amusing-sounding mystery, Undercover, playing at the Tarragon. http://drewrowsome.blogspot.ca/2017/09/undercover-case-of-comic-mystery.html

Towleroad links to fascinating ethnographic work of LGBT members of American street gangs. How do they do it? http://www.towleroad.com/2017/09/gay-gang/

[URBAN NOTE] Four blogTO links: Niagara Falls, Kensington Market, 450 Pape, Toronto Book Garden

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  • Having visited Friday, I liked the blogTO report on the early days of Toronto’s love affair with Niagara Falls.
  • blogTO shares photos of Kensington Market in the raw 1970s.
  • The exterior of 450 Pape Avenue was used for the movie It, and the place is seeing Stephen King pilgrims already.
  • The Toronto Book Garden, a lovely mini-park at Harbourfront keyed to literary Toronto, opened yesterday.