A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular literature

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at evidence that Ceres’ Occator Crater, an apparent cryovolcano, may have been recently active.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin wonders what would have happened had Kerensky accepted the German Reichstag’s proposal in 1917.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some fun that employees at a bookstore in France got up to with book covers.
  • Cody Delistraty describes F. Scott Fitzgerald’s utter failure to fit into Hollywood.
  • A Fistful of Euros hosts Alex Harrowell’s blog post taking a look at recent history from a perspective of rising populism.
  • io9 reports on a proposal from the Chinese city of Lanzhou to set up a water pipeline connecting it to Siberia’s Lake Baikal.
  • Imageo notes a recent expedition by Norwegian scientists aiming at examining the winter ice.
  • Strange Maps links to an amazing graphic mapping the lexical distances between Europe’s languages.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is on the verge of a new era of population decline, and shares a perhaps alarming perspective on the growth of Muslim populations in Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] “Indie bookstores angered by Toronto Arts Council grant to IFOA”

NOW Toronto‘s Susan G. Cole notes how independent bookstores in Toronto are upset by a grant of money by the Toronto municipal government to a literary festival.

A grant from the Toronto Arts Council to the International Festival of Authors, bestowed last fall, has outraged programmers for the city’s independent bookstores.

“The decision to fund IFOA feels like a nail in the coffin for indie bookstores and shows the Arts Council’s lack of concern for the financial health of independent booksellers,” says Another Story event organizer Anjula Gogia, representing other indie stores and festivals as well, including Pages Unbound and Glad Day Books.

The IFOA’s new program called Toronto Lit Up has received close to $300,000 over three years and is designed to assist publishers in launching new books by Toronto authors.

IFOA director Geoffrey Taylor explains that a committee – comprised of himself, author Dionne Brand, Quill and Quire’s Allison Jones and Hazel Millar, representing the Literary Press Group – has been formed to allocate the monies and is accepting applications from publishers and authors seeking funds for launches.

The problem, according to Gogia, the former programmer for the now shuttered Toronto Women’s Bookstore, is that indie stores could very well be squeezed out of the launch scene that’s so crucial to their businesses. Books sold at launches represent their bread and butter.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 27, 2017 at 5:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “The fascinating history of Toronto’s oldest bookstore”

blogTO’s Phil Villeneuve shares the story of Toronto’s Glad Day Bookshop, the oldest GLBT library in the world still operating.

Very few book stores in the world have been fought off widespread hate, battled censorship at the Supreme Court, and acted as home base for an entire community of people. Toronto’s Glad Day bookshop has, which is why it’s even more special that it’s not only Toronto’s oldest bookstore, but the world’s oldest LGBT bookstore.

Glad Day took the title after New York’s Oscar Wilde bookstore closed in 2009 because of low sales and high rent. That shop opened in 1967.

Glad Day was opened in 1970 by Jearld Moldenhauer out of his home in the Annex. The residential space also doubled as the office for The Body Politic, a gay and lesbian political paper, which eventually morphed into Xtra and then to the now online-only DailyXtra.com.

After folks moved in and out of the home, Moldenhauer and a group men bought a place in Cabbagetown at 138 Seaton Street and operated the shop out of there.

It was a time when a gay and lesbian bookstore could exist out of someone’s living room and word spread wide enough for the city’s queer population to know exactly where to go — all very much on the down low and in fear of violence.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 21, 2017 at 8:00 pm

[PHOTO] Hotel Nelligan, 106 rue Saint-Paul Ouest

Hotel Nelligan, 106 rue Saint-Paul ouest

Wandering Vieux-Montréal in the emerging evening light, I wandered past Hotel Nelligan, an establishment named after the great poet Émile Nelligan.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 21, 2017 at 12:05 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith wonders why so many stories featuring gay children kicked out of their families feature the children later reuniting with these same people.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly draws from her own experiences growing up in a family marked by abuse to argue that Trump is treating Americans as any abuser treats their dependents.
  • D-Brief notes how the Moon is being bombarded by a wind of oxygen from Earth.
  • Joe. My. God. reported rumours that the Trump administration is set to remove employment protections for LGBT employees of federal contractors.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the firing of the US Attorney General for refusing to defend Trump’s anti-Muslim visa ban.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at how medieval people read maps.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders how the Trump presidency will end up, if he will self-destruct or if he will manage to threaten American democracy.
  • Torontoist interviewed some of the Torontonians protesting the US visa ban outside of the American consulate.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes the Distillery District’s Toronto Light Festival.
  • Border Thinking Laura Agustín looks at migrants and refugees in James Ellroy’s The Black Dahlia.
  • Centauri Dreams suggests that Perry’s expedition to Japan could be taken as a metaphor for first contact.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a report about how brown dwarf EPIC 219388192 b.
  • The LRB Blog notes the use of torture as a technique of intimidation.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at China’s very heavy investment in Laos.
  • The NYRB Daily examines violence and the surprising lack thereof in El Salvador.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw touches on the controversies surrounding Australia Day.
  • Transit Toronto reports the sentencing of some people who attacked TTC officers.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that a Putin running out of resources needs to make a deal.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal for the relatively rapid industrialization of space in a few short years using smart robots with 3d printign technology.
  • To what extent, as Crooked Timber speculates, the Arthurian myth complex science fictional?
  • Dangerous Minds shares a lovely middle-finger-raised candle.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the interactions between atmospheres and rotation for super-Earths and Venus-like worlds.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Wikileaks’ call for Trump’s tax returns.
  • Language Hat shares some words peculiar to Irish English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the words of Trump are meaningless.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cown considers some scenarios where nuclear weapons may end up being used.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog looks at births and deaths in Russia between 2000 and 2015.
  • Savage Minds considers, inspired by the recent Michel Foucault read-in protest to Trump, the relationships between Foucault’s thinking and racism.
  • Window on Eurasia calls for a post-imperial Russian national identity, argues that Trump’s assault on globalization will badly hurt a Russia dependent on foreign trade and investment, and wonders what Putin’s Russia can actually offer Trump’s United States.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell offers a unique strategy for journalists interested at penetrating Trump’s shell: trick them into over-answering.