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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular literature

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthropology.net looks at the genetics of how the Inuit have adapted to cold weather.
  • ‘Nathan Smith’s Apostrophen shares the author’s plans for the coming year.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling shares Margaret Atwood’s commitment to fighting for freedom of expression.
  • Crooked Timber asks its readers for recommendations in Anglophone science fiction.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of the human mesentery.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the protoplanetary disk of LkCa 15 disk.
  • Far Outliers looks at some lobsters imported to Japan from (a) Christmas Island.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Janet Jackson has given birth.
  • Language Hat examines the contrast often made between indigenous and immigrant languages.
  • Language Log looks at the names of the stations of the Haifa subway.
  • Steve Munro notes Bathurst Station’s goodbye to Honest Ed’s.
  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the Dawn probe’s discoveries at Ceres in the past year.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how the permafrost of the Russian far north is melting and endangering entire cities, and contrasts the prosperity of the Estonian city of Narva relative to the decay of adjacent Ivangorod.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith announces some of his plans for the forthcoming year.
  • C.J. Cherryh talks about her experience of early winter in Oklahoma.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a collection of electoral map what-ifs.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the worrying connection between Rogue One and fake news.
  • The NYRB Daily shares Tim Parks’ reflections on Machiavelli’s The Prince.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer reports on the ongoing constitutional crisis in the Congo.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photo of Charlottetown’s Province House.
  • Strange Maps shares Radio Garden, a map of the globe that lets people pick up thousands of radio stations around the world.
  • Transit Toronto notes a new boarding area for GO Transit users at Union Station.
  • Window on Eurasia shares criticism of Russia’s Syria policy that calls it Orwellian.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomy reports on the astounding scientific illiteracy of Trump advisor Anthony Scaramucci.
  • blogTO compiles a list of the best tobagganing hills in Toronto.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at what we can do in the redwood forests.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a gap in the disk of TW Hydrae.
  • Imageo notes that 2016 is the warmest year in the records.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a pride parade protected by police went off in Montenegro.
  • Language Hat shares the story of Lazer Lederhendler, a son of Holocaust survivors in Montréal who became one of the leading translators into English of Québec literature.
  • Language Log looks at the distant origins of Japanese terms for “dog.”
  • Marginal Revolution notes the rising popularity of Vladimir Putin on the American right.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the links between Russia and the “Calexit” movement.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy celebrates Saturnalia.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russia’s use of genetics to disentangle the Tatar peoples and argues that the definition of Russians and Ukrainians as fraternal is dangerous to the latter.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the advanced microelectronics that might last a space probe the two decades it would take to get to Proxima Centauri.
  • Dangerous Minds links to a 1980 filmed concert performance by Queen.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the discovery of potassium in the atmosphere of WASP-17b.
  • Language Hat looks at the Carmina of Optatianus, an interesting piece of Latin literature.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the shameless anti-democratic maneuvering of the Republicans in North Carolina.
  • The LRB Blog reflects on the shamelessness of the perpetrators of the Aleppo massacres.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at what Charles Darwin’s reading habits have to say about the man’s process of research.
  • North!’s Justin Petrone looks at the elves of Estonia.
  • The NYRB Daily praises the new movie Manchester by the Sea.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a recent photo of Phobos.
  • Peter Rukavina argues that the Island’s low PISA scores do not necessarily reflect on what Islanders have learned.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay by someone who combines academic work with library work.
  • Torontoist notes the city’s subsidies to some major water polluters.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the anniversary of some important riots in Kazakhstan.
  • Arnold Zwicky reflects on the penguin-related caption of a photo on Wikipedia that has made the world laugh.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Natha Smith talks about his tradition of the stuffed Christmas stocking.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling talks about the decline of the Pebble wearables.
  • blogTO lists some of the hot new bookstores in Toronto.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about some of her family’s traditions.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at the ancient history of rice cultivation in the Indus Valley Civilization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the willingness of the Oklahoma Cherokee Nation to recognize same-sex marriages.
  • Language Log shares a photo of an unusual multi-script ad from East Asia.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the Russian involvement in the American election and its import.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a book about the transition in China’s financial sector.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on efforts to revive the moribund and very complex Caucasian of Ubykh.

[FORUM] What fictional universes do you like to analyze?

​Thinking about last night’s post on the position of religion in <I>Star Trek</I>, I realized not for the first time that I think way too much about the way that fictional universe plausibly works.

I am quite fine with that. It is a source of interest for me, an intellectual game playing with a setting that plenty of others know and can engage with. It can be fun, so why not go ahead?

That is me. What about you? What fictional universes do you like to try to analyze?

Written by Randy McDonald

December 10, 2016 at 11:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith has a two part review of some of the fiction that he has recently read.
  • blogTO looks at Casa Loma lit up for the holidays.
  • Dangerous Minds notes The London Nobody Knows, a documentary of the grim areas of late Victorian London.
  • Language Hat looks at how 16th century Spanish linguists represented Nahuatl spelling.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the iatrogenic transmission of syphilis via unsterile instruments during the Civil War.
  • The LRB Blog notes the many conflicting contracts signed by the KGB with different television groups at the end of the Cold War.
  • Marginal Revolution notes Rio de Janeiro’s attempts to deal with tourism-targeted crime by compensating victims with a tourist-directed tax.
  • Maximos62 looks at the geological reasons for Indonesia’s volcanism.
  • Progressive Download looks at the all-woman Homeward Bound expedition to Antarctica.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the backstory behind the creation of the village of Crapaud.
  • Spacing Toronto looks at how signs asking people to go slow in children-inhabited zones.
  • Torontoist looks at where Suicide Squad was filmed in Toronto.
  • The Understanding Society Blog looks at the specific experiences which molded the French tradition of sociology.