A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘popular music

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.
  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of “The Ballad of the Green Berets”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence’s introduction into our civilization to be managed.
  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.
  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.
  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.
  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada’s space future by the Space Advisory Board.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes the latest on fast radio burst FRB 121102.
  • D-Brief makes a good case for the human diet to expand to include insects. I’d like to try an insect burger myself.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some wonderful photos of Joy Division’s Ian Curtis.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting up to 1% of stars could capture, at least temporarily, rogue planets.
  • Hornet Stories–the new name for Unicorn Booty–notes the latest shake-up in German-language LGBTQ media.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a thoughtful essay by Christa Blackmon, drawing from her experiences as a survivor of Hurricane Andrew. How do you best take care of child survivors?
  • The Map Room Blog links to a fascinating-sounding book, Alastair Bonnett’s new Beyond the Map.
  • The NYR Daily reviews a documentary about the Venerable W, a Buddhist monk in Burma who has led anti-Muslim violence.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the way forward for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the search for Texas barbecue in Mexico City.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte, loneliest galaxy in the Local Group.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the recent detailed view of the star Antares, and notes Antares’ mysteries.
  • False Steps’ Paul Drye notes Project Adam, a Sputnik-era proposal for a manned American suborbital flight.
  • Far Outliers recounts a 1945 encounter between an American general and the Sultan of Sulu, impoverished by the war.
  • Language Log notes the Sino-Indian propaganda video war over their border dispute in the Himalayas.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the messy process of the demobilization of FARC in Colombia.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how Virginia has managed to become a multicultural success story.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the photos of India taken by Cartier-Bresson.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders how, despite the drug war, Mexico City continues to feel (even be) so peaceful. Can it last?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel goes through the many reasons why it makes no sense to fear first contact with aliens.
  • Strange Company tells of Bunkie Dodge, pool-playing cat of early 20th century New England.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that the new Taylor Swift song is inspired by Right Said Fred’s “I’m So Sexy.”
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument that an essentially post-colonial Russophone cultural community cannot coexist with a Russian empire.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Antipope Charlie Stross takes a look at the parlous state of the world, and imagines what if the US and UK went differently.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Sirius, including white dwarf Sirius B.
  • Centauri Dreams considers Cassini’s final function, as a probe of Saturn’s atmosphere.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that diamonds rain deep in Neptune (and Uranus).
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on a NASA scientist’s argument that we need new interstellar probes, not unlike Voyager 1.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the way a course syllabus is like a Van Halen contract rider.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the palimpsests of St. Catherine’s Monastery, deep in the Sinai.
  • Language Log looks at the etymology, and the history, of chow mein.
  • The LRB Blog recounts a visit to Mount Rushmore in the era of Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at the question of why Mexico isn’t enjoying higher rates of economic growth.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers the extent to which politics these days is just sound and fury, meaning nothing.
  • Mark Simpson links to an essay of his explaining why we should be glad the Smiths broke up in 1987.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle considers the import, to him and the environment, of a spring near his cottage.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the abundance of black holes in our galaxy, more than one hundred million.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that smoking marijuana might–might–have sexual benefits.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument that ethnic Russians in Russia share issue in common with whites in America, and reports on an argument made by one man that ethnic Russians in republics need not learn local languages.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Dangerous Minds points readers to Cindy Sherman’s Instagram account. (“_cindysherman_”, if you are interested.)
  • Language Hat takes note of a rare early 20th century Judaeo-Urdu manuscript.
  • Language Log lists some of the many, many words and phrases banned from Internet usage in China.
  • The argument made at Lawyers, Guns and Money about Trump’s many cognitive defects is frightening. How can he be president?
  • The LRB Blog notes that many traditional Labour voters, contra fears, are in fact willing to vote for non-ethnocratic policies.
  • The NYR Daily describes a book of photos with companion essays by Teju Cole that I like.
  • Of course, as Roads and Kingdom notes, there is such a thing as pho craft beer in Vietnam.
  • Peter Rukavina notes</a. the genetic history of mice in New York City and the beavers of Prince Edward Island.
  • Towleroad notes a love duet between Kele Okereke and Olly Alexander.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy seems unconvinced by the charges against Kronos programmer Marcus Hutchins.