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[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Architectuul looks at the Portuguese architectural cooperative Ateliermob, here.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at how white dwarf WD J091405.30+191412.25 is literally vapourizing a planet in close orbit.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog explains</a< to readers why you really do not want to have to look for parking in New York City.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the slowing of the solar wind far from the Sun.
  • John Holbo at Crooked Timber considers the gap between ideals and actuals in the context of conspiracies and politics.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on how the ESA is trying to solve a problem with the parachutes of the ExoMars probe.
  • Far Outliers reports on what Harry Truman thought about politicians.
  • Gizmodo reports on a new method for identifying potential Earth-like worlds.
  • io9 pays tribute to legendary writer, of Star Trek and much else, D.C. Fontana.
  • The Island Review reports on the football team of the Chagos Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. reports that gay Olympian Gus Kenworthy will compete for the United Kingdom in 2020.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how early English imperialists saw America and empire through the lens of Ireland.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money does not like Pete Buttigieg.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the London Bridge terrorist attack.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map of Prince William Sound, in Alaska, that is already out of date because of global warming.
  • Marginal Revolution questions if Cebu, in the Philippines, is the most typical city in the world.
  • The NYR Daily looks at gun violence among Arab Israelis.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers what needs to be researched next on Mars.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of Sister Gracy, a Salesian nun at work in South Sudan.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting continued population growth expected in much of Europe, and the impact of this growth on the environment.
  • Strange Maps shares a map of fried chicken restaurants in London.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why a 70 solar mass black hole is not unexpected.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever gives</a his further thoughts on the Pixel 4.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, last year, 37 thousand Russians died of HIV/AIDS.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts from a consideration of the 1948 film Kind Hearts and Coronets.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Architectuul visits the studio of Barbas Lopes Arquitectos in Lisbon, here.
  • Bad Astronomer takes a look at a new paper examining the effectiveness of different asteroid detection technologies, including nuclear weapons.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting potentially habitable planets orbiting Alpha Centauri B, smaller of the two stars, could suffer from rapid shifts of their axes.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber argues some polls suggest some American conservatives really would prefer Russia as a model to California.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery, by the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia, of 27 supernova remnants in our galaxy.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about stealth aircraft, here.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting that DNA is but one of very very many potential genetic molecules.
  • Language Hat shares a reevaluation of the Richard Stanyhurst translation of the Aeneid, with its manufactured words. Why mightn’t this have been not mockable but rather creative?
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrated the 50th anniversary of the takeover of Alcatraz Island by Native American activists.
  • Chris Bertram writes at the LRB Blog, after the catastrophe of the Essex van filled with dozens of dead migrants, about the architecture of exclusion that keeps out migrants.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a comment looking at the fentanyl crisis from a new angle.
  • Jenny Uglow writes at the NYR Daily about a Science Museum exhibit highlighting the dynamic joys of science and its progress over the centuries.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes a look at the question of how to prevent the wildfires currently raging in Australia. What could have been done, what should be done?
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on proposals from China for two long-range probe missions to interstellar space, including a Neptune flyby.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the wonderfully innocent Pinocchio currently playing at the Young People’s Theatre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the evidence for the universe, maybe, being closed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Alexandria Patriarchate is the next Orthodox body to recognize the Ukrainian church.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at irregular versus regular, as a queer word too.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul looks at the Porto architectural project Critical Concrete, here.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares the evidence for our galaxy having experienced a phase as a quasar a quarter-million years long some 3.5 million years ago.
  • Author James Bow celebrates the end of his publicity tour for The Night Girl, including a controversy over cover art featuring the CN Tower.
  • Robert Zubrin at Centauri Dreams considers how we could detect energy from artificial singularities used for power and propulsion. (Is this how we find the Romulans?)
  • The Crux considers whether or not the new proposals for more powerful supercolliders in China and Europe are likely to produce new discoveries.
  • D-Brief explains why older generations so often look down on the young: The elders idealize their younger selves too much.
  • Dead Things notes new evidence, in the tracks of trilobites moving in line 480 million years ago, for early life being able to engage in collective behaviour.
  • io9 interviews Kami Garcia about her new YA book featuring venerable DC character Raven, remaking her for new readers.
  • The Island Review interviews David Gange about The Frayed Atlantic Edge, his book account of his kayak trip down the western coasts of Britain and Ireland.
  • JSTOR Daily explains why Martin Luther King Jr. thought so highly of jazz.
  • Eleanor Penny argues at the LRB Blog against taking Malthus, with his pessimism trending towards a murderous misanthropy, as a prophet for our times.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the play American Moor, which touches on the efforts of black actors to engage with Shakespeare.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new film The Flick, an old to old-style movies and theatres.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map depicting Hutterite migrations across early modern Europe.
  • Starts With A Bang shares new speculation that some evidence for dark matter might actually be a mistake in measurement.
  • Strange Maps notes the now mostly submerged continent of Greater Adria.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a suggestion that the deep Russophilia of many ordinary people in Belarus might support union with Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the different meanings of “unaccompanied”.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how a photo of the Large Magellanic Cloud makes him recognize it as an irregular spiral, not a blob.
  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the life of cosmonaut Alexei Leonov.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with one particular claim about the benefits of war and empire.
  • The Crux looks at fatal familial insomnia, a genetic disease that kills through inflicting sleeplessness on its victims.
  • D-Brief looks at suggestions that magnetars are formed by the collisions of stars.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to the fantasy art of Arthur Rackham.
  • Cody Delistraty considers some evidence suggesting that plants have a particular kind of intelligence.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the expansion by Russia of its airbase in Hneymim, Syria.
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about the critical and changing position of libraries as public spaces in our cities.
  • Gizmodo looks at one marvelous way scientists have found to cheat quantum mechanics.
  • Information is Beautiful outlines a sensible proposal to state to cultivate seaweed a as source of food and fuel.
  • io9 notes that, in the exciting new X-Men relaunch, immortal Moira MacTaggart is getting her own solo book.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the now-defunct Thomas Cook travel agency played a role in supporting British imperialism, back in the day.
  • Language Log notes that the Oxford English Dictionary is citing the blog on the use of “their” as a singular.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the grounds for impeaching Donald Trump.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the politics of Mozambique at the country approaches dangerous times.
  • Sean Marshall notes the southern Ontario roads that run to Paris and to London.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a problematic scientific study that tried to use rabbits to study the female human orgasm.
  • Steve Baker at The Numerati looks at a new book on journalism by veteran Peter Copeland.
  • The NYR Daily makes the point that depending on biomass as a green energy solution is foolish.
  • The Planetary Science Blog notes a 1983 letter by then-president Carl Sagan calling for a NASA mission to Saturn and Titan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews photojournalist Eduardo Leal on his home city of Porto, particularly as transformed by tourism.
  • Drew Rowsome notes the book Dreamland, an examination of the early amusement park.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper considering, in broad detail, how the consequence of population aging could be mitigated in the labour market of the European Union.
  • Strange Company reports on a bizarre poltergeist in a British garden shed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the new strength of a civic national identity in Kazakhstan, based on extensive polling.
  • Arnold Zwicky, surely as qualified a linguist as any, examines current verb of the American moment, “depose”.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten city links: Montréal, Lac-Mégantic, Halifax, Calgary, Edmonton …

  • Tracey Lindeman writes at CityLab about how Montréal is trying to keep the redevelopment of the Molson-Coors Brewery site from killing the Centre-Sud.
  • In the Montréal neighbourhood of Park-Extension, evictions–renovictions, even–are on the rise. Global News reports.
  • Lac-Mégantic now has a train depot that bypasses the heart of this traumatized community. CBC Montreal reports.
  • Halifax is now celebrating the Mosaic Festival, celebrating its diversity. Global News reports.
  • Jill Croteau reports for Global News about Club Carousel, an underground club in Calgary that played a vital role in that city’s LGBTQ history.
  • This business plan, aiming to bypass long lineups at the Edmonton outpost of the Jollibee chain, is ingenious. Global News reports.
  • The Iowa town of Pacific Junction, already staggering, may never recover from a recent bout of devastating flooding. VICE reports.
  • Avery Gregurich writes for CityLab about the Illinois town of Atlas, a crossroads seemingly on the verge of disappearing from Google Maps.
  • The proposal for Metropica, a new sort of suburb in Florida, certainly looks interesting. VICE reports.
  • Guardian Cities shares a cartoon looking affectionately at Lisbon.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at the German city of Nordlingen, formed in a crater created by the impact of a binary asteroid with Earth.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the possibility that the farside of the Moon might bear the imprint of an ancient collision with a dwarf planet the size of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that dredging for the expansion of the port of Miami has caused terrible damage to corals there.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the last appearances of David Bowie and Iggy Pop together on stage.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China is on track to launch an ambitious robotic mission to Mars in 2020.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog talks about what sociological research actually is.
  • Gizmodo reports on the discovery of a torus of cool gas circling Sagittarius A* at a distance of a hundredth of a light-year.
  • io9 reports about Angola Janga, an independent graphic novel by Marcelo D’Salete showing how slaves from Africa in Brazil fought for their freedom and independence.
  • The Island Review shares some poems of Matthew Landrum, inspired by the Faroe Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. looks at how creationists are mocking flat-earthers for their lack of scientific knowledge.
  • Language Hat looks at the observations of Mary Beard that full fluency in ancient Latin is rare even for experts, for reasons I think understandable.
  • Melissa Byrnes wrote at Lawyers, Guns and Money about the meaning of 4 June 1989 in the political transitions of China and Poland.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how the New York Times has become much more aware of cutting-edge social justice in recent years.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the memories and relics of the Sugar Land prison complex outside of Houston, Texas, are being preserved.
  • Jason C Davis at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the differences between LightSail 1 and the soon-to-be-launched LightSail 2.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks in detail at the high electricity prices in Argentina.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the problems with electric vehicle promotion on PEI.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at when the universe will have its first black dwarf. (Not in a while.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Belarusians are not as interested in becoming citizens of Russia as an Internet poll suggests.
  • Arnold Zwicky highlights a Pride Month cartoon set in Antarctica featuring the same-sex marriage of two penguins.

[AH] Five #alternatehistory maps from r/imaginarymaps: Germany, Britain, Africa, Japan, Iran

  • r/imaginarymaps imagines a Germany united along religious lines, Protestant areas falling under Prussia and Catholic ones under Austria.
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps imagines a republican Great Britain. When could republicanism have taken off in the British Isles as a whole?
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps shares a map of a former Portuguese colony of Zambezia, a Lusophone nation stretching from the Atlantic at Namibia east through to Mozambique.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map, imagining a Japan (and northeast Asia generally) split into sheres of influence by rival European powers, treaty ports and all, surely describes a worst-case scenario for 19th century Japan. How likely was this?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines an Iran that, following a 9/11-style attack by Lebanese terrorists in Moscow, ends up partitioned between Soviet and US-Arab spheres of influence.