A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘potatoes

[NEWS] Twenty news links

  • NOW Toronto looks at the Pickering nuclear plant and its role in providing fuel for space travel.
  • In some places like California, traffic is so bad that airlines actually play a role for high-end commuters. CBC reports.
  • Goldfish released into the wild are a major issue for the environment in Québec, too. CTV News reports.
  • China’s investments in Jamaica have good sides and bad sides. CBC reports.
  • A potato museum in Peru might help solve world hunger. The Guardian reports.
  • Is the Alberta-Saskatchewan alliance going to be a lasting one? Maclean’s considers.
  • Is the fossil fuel industry collapsing? The Tyee makes the case.
  • Should Japan and Europe co-finance a EUrasia trade initiative to rival China’s? Bloomberg argues.
  • Should websites receive protection as historically significant? VICE reports.
  • Food tourism in the Maritimes is a very good idea. Global News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada lobster exports to China thrive as New England gets hit by the trade war. CBC reports.
  • The Bloc Québécois experienced its revival by drawing on the same demographics as the provincial CAQ. Maclean’s reports.
  • Population density is a factor that, in Canada, determines political issues, splitting urban and rural voters. The National Observer observes.
  • US border policies aimed against migration from Mexico have been harming businesses on the border with Canada. The National Post reports.
  • The warming of the ocean is changing the relationship of coastal communities with their seas. The Conversation looks.
  • Archival research in the digital age differs from what occurred in previous eras. The Conversation explains.
  • The Persian-language Wikipedia is an actively contested space. Open Democracy reports.
  • Vox notes how the US labour shortage has been driven partly by workers quitting the labour force, here.
  • Laurie Penny at WIRED has a stirring essay about hope, about the belief in some sort of future.

[ISL] Five #PEI links: Airbnb, Charlottetown Mall, Crapaud, Région Évangéline, seaweed pie

  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes the proportionally extreme impact of Airbnb on the very tight housing market in Charlottetown.
  • The Guardian notes the redevelopment of the Charlottetown Mall will see new stores and several hundred new housing units.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on his successful electronic mapping of every building in the community of Crapaud.
  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes that a move to amalgamate the predominantly Francophone and Acadian west-end Région Évangéline into a single municipality has halted.
  • Atlas Obscura reports on the PEI dish of seaweed pie, made from Irish moss, once in the community of Miminegash and now available at the Canadian Potato Museum in O’Leary.

[ISL] Five #PEI links; Byron Carr, The Guardian, Wellington, potatoes, marijuana

  • The Guardian reports on how Charlottetown police have asked a tipster with information on the murder of Byron Carr to come forward.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on the astounding lack of timely coverage of the Charlottetown mayoral election by the Guardian.
  • Global News reports on how the small town of Wellington, in the Région Evangeline, found itself without a mayor. Have things since changed?
  • CBC PEI reports on how, faced with very difficult conditions for potato harvesting, some lucky farmers have helped their colleagues with their crops.
  • Have the high prices for legal marijuana reported by CBC PEI since come down?

[ISL] Five #PEI links: food, potatoes, heat warning, immigration, affordable housing

  • Bon Appetit has a mostly accurate listing of things to do and places to see and eat on Prince Edward Island.
  • The warm dry summer means that Prince Edward Island faces a serious potato shortage with economic consequences. Global News reports.
  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes that, according to Environment Canada, what counts as a heat warning on the Island might not be such in Toronto. Local conditions matter.
  • A federal government probe has been opened up into immigration practices on the Island, as it is alleged that some immigrants connived with some motel owners to provide fake addresses. The National Post tells the story.
  • The Guardian notes that senior citizens on the Island, with fixed incomes, are hit hard by the shortages of affordable rental housing.

[PHOTO] Potato fields stretching from Point Prim Road down to Long Creek, PEI

This vista, of fields dense with white potato blossoms flowing south to the blue Long Creek and the Northumberland Strait beyond, past farms and isolated houses and Camp Buchan, struck me when I saw it from the car. Happily, my parents were more than willing to stop to let me photograph this.

Potato fields stretching from Point Prim Road down to Long Creek (1) #pei #princeedwardisland #belfast #longcreek #potato #potatoes #fields #northumberlandstrait #pointprimroad #latergram

Potato fields stretching from Point Prim Road down to Long Creek (2) #pei #princeedwardisland #belfast #longcreek #potato #potatoes #fields #northumberlandstrait #pointprimroad #latergram

Potato fields stretching from Point Prim Road down to Long Creek (3) #pei #princeedwardisland #belfast #longcreek #potato #potatoes #blossoms #fields #northumberlandstrait #pointprimroad #latergram

Potato fields stretching from Point Prim Road down to Long Creek (4) #pei #princeedwardisland #belfast #longcreek #potato #potatoes #blossoms #fields #northumberlandstrait #pointprimroad #latergram

Potato fields stretching from Point Prim Road down to Long Creek (5) #pei #princeedwardisland #belfast #longcreek #potato #potatoes #blossoms #fields #northumberlandstrait #pointprimroad #latergram

Potato fields stretching from Point Prim Road down to Long Creek (6) #pei #princeedwardisland #belfast #longcreek #potato #potatoes #blossoms #fields #northumberlandstrait #pointprimroad #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

November 15, 2017 at 8:00 am

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • The Associated Press notes the hostility in many American communities to Muslim cemeteries.
  • Bloomberg explores the revival of watchmaking in East Germany’s Saxony, and touches on the new two-day public work week in Venezuela.
  • Bloomberg View notes Japan’s rising levels of poverty, looks at the politicization of the Brazilian education system, and examines potential consequences of Pakistan-China nuclear collaboration.
  • The CBC reports on the difficulties of the Canada-European Union trade pact, reports on the conviction of an Alberta couple for not taking their meningitis-afflicted child to medical attention until it was too late, and notes that an American-Spanish gay couple was able to retrieve their child from a Thai surrogate mother.
  • MacLean’s examines how Karla Homolka ending up shifting towards French Canada.
  • The National Post‘s Michael den Tandt is critical of the idea of a new Bombardier bailout.
  • Universe Today notes a paper arguing that, with only one example of life, we can say little with assuredness about extraterrestrial life’s frequency.
  • Vice‘s Noisey notes how Prince and Kate Bush ended up collaborating on “Why Should I Love You?”.
  • The Washington Post reports on a study suggesting that root crops like the potato were less suited to supporting complex civilizations than grains.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

  • The Atlantic notes Thailand’s “fake children”, life-sized dolls that are charms.
  • Bloomberg View considers the costs to the United Kingdom of Brexit and the costs and benefits of said to the European Union.
  • Discover looks at the increasingly appreciated place of South Africa in hominid origins.
  • The Inter Press Service examines the closure of Bedouin settlements in Israel.
  • MacLean’s celebrates the Yukon Gold potato’s 50th anniversary.
  • National Geographic looks at the growing number of problems faced by the baboons of Cape Town.
  • The New Yorker considers what might be in the suppressed 28 pages of the 9/11 report.
  • Phys.org maps Neanderthal and Denisovan ancestry worldwide.
  • Reuters notes the discovery of the first monkey fossils in North America.
  • Slate hosts an article complaining about the normalization of Berlin since reunification.
  • The Washington Post mourns the bleaching of nearly all of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

[LINK] “Storm Chips are here as New Brunswick’s Covered Bridge reveals new flavour”

CBC’s report on the mainstreaming of #stormchips in the Maritimes is a delight.

A New Brunswick chip company is cashing in on a social media trend started right here in the Nova Scotia newsroom of the CBC.

Covered Bridge Potato Chips unveiled their latest flavour this week: “Storm chips” aren’t just one flavour but a “flurry of flavours” in one delicious bag.

Here’s how it all began:

On a cold and stormy January day in 2014, Mainstreet host Stephanie Domet mused to newsreader Ryan Pierce that on her list of things to get at the grocery store in advance of the storm were ripple chips and dip.

In fact, those two items constituted the entirety of her list. Pierce admitted his own list was similar and #stormchips became a thing.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 18, 2015 at 8:55 pm

[ISL] “Reward increased to $500,000 in potato tampering investigation in P.E.I.”

The Canadian Press reports on the latest in a criminal investigation on Prince Edward Island.

Prince Edward Island’s potato industry has increased the reward it is offering to $500,000 for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of whomever is responsible for inserting metal objects into potatoes.

The new reward is available until Aug. 15, and tips received from Aug. 16 to Oct. 31 will be eligible for the previous reward amount of $100,000.

The federal government recently announced it will spend $1.5 million to buy metal detection equipment to help find foreign objects in potatoes from the province.

The funding will be used to purchase and install detection equipment, while an extra $500,000 from the province is being used for on-site security assessments and training.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 30, 2015 at 10:39 pm

[LINK] “Climate Change Threatens Quechua and Their Crops in Peru’s Andes”

The Inter Press Service’s Fabiola Ortiz reports on how climate change in the Peruvian Andes is threatening the potato.

In the Parque de la Papa, which is at an altitude of up to 4,500 metres and covers 9,200 hectares, 6,000 indigenous villagers from five communities – Amaru, Chawaytire, Pampallaqta, Paru Paru and Sacaca – are preserving potatoes and biodiversity, along with their spiritual rites and traditional farming techniques.

The Parque de la Papa, a mosaic of fields that hold the greatest diversity of potatoes in the world, 1,460 varieties, was created in 2002 with the support of the Asociación Andes.

This protected area in the Sacred Valley of the Incas is surrounded by lofty peaks known as ‘Apus’ or divine guardians of life, which until recently were snow-capped year-round.

“People are finally waking up to the problem of climate change. They’re starting to think about the future of life, the future of the family. What will the weather be like? Will we have food?” 50-year-old community leader Lino Mamani, one of the ‘papa arariwa’ – potato guardians, in Quechua – told IPS.

He said that whoever is sceptical about climate change can come to the Peruvian Andes to see that it’s real. “Pachamama [mother earth, in Quechua] is nervous about what we are doing to her. All of the crops are moving up the mountains, to higher and higher ground, and they will do so until it’s too high to grow,” he said.

[. . .]

To prevent crop damage, over the last 30 years farmers have increased the altitude at which they plant potatoes by more than 1,000 metres, said Mamani. That information was confirmed by the Asociación Andes and by researchers at the International Potato Centre (CIP), based in Lima.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 30, 2014 at 10:31 pm