A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘public art

[PHOTO] Rainbow stripes of Pride, Eaton Centre

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Rainbow stripes of Pride #toronto #eatoncentre #rainbow #publicart #pride #lgbtq

Written by Randy McDonald

June 21, 2019 at 6:00 am

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: HTO Beach, street art, transit, Draper Street, real estate

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  • Toronto’s HTO Park, a fake beach on the waterfront of Queens Quay, has been flooded out by Lake Ontario, too. blogTO reports.
  • This open-air street art museum around Dundas West is an ingenious idea. blogTO reports.
  • David Hains at Spacing explains how the TTC plans for major sports events, like the recent Raptors series.
  • One house in Corso Italia has just gone on the real estate market for the first time since 1919. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The row of vintage homes on Draper Street and its recently passed keeper are memorialized nicely here. The Toronto Star reports.

[VIDEO] Four clips of the Light Parade, Nuit Rose (#nuitroseto)

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I attended the Church and Wellesley components of the Nuit Rose LGBTQ art festival last night. I have plenty of photos, images needing processing when I have time later this week. For now, please enjoy these short video clips I took of the Light Parade at different stages along its route, the first two on Alexander Street, the next at Church and Wellesley, and the last at Barbara Hall Park.

[NEWS] Twelve LGBTQ links (#lgbtq, #queer)

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  • Daily Xtra looks at 50 years of fighting for LGBTQ rights in Canada, here.
  • Them links to a variety of classic documentaries about LGBTQ life before Stonewall, here.
  • Atlas Obscura explains why lesbians and potluck dinners are so closely associated with each other, here.
  • Them looks at the controversies surrounding the construction of monuments to LGBTQ heroes of the past, here.
  • VICE explains how venerable magazine Out was nearly ended by poor management, here.
  • Wired looks at queer history in TV movies, here.
  • Connor Garel at NOW Toronto writes, inspired by Paris Is Burning and the drag scene, about the importance of maintaining queer spaces, here.
  • Enzo DiMatteo writes at NOW Toronto about the long history of homophobia of Doug Ford, here.
  • Claire Provost writes at Open Democracy about the frighteningly well-coordinated global campaign by groups on the right against LGBTQ superheroes, here.
  • Michael Waters at Daily Xtra explains the key role of young users of social media in keeping even obscure corners of LGBTQ history alive, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Artscape, PoP Shoppe, Funhouse,

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  • Tanya Mok at blogTO looks at Artscape Weston Common.
  • Jamie Bradburn looks at the heyday of the PoP Shoppe, a late 1970s chain specializing in different kids of soda drinks.
  • Toronto Life reports on the Funhouse experience created inside an old Buddhist temple off Queen Street West.
  • blogTO notes that, at least so far as absolute numbers are concerned, Toronto is the fastest-growing city in the United States and Canada.
  • Toronto Life reports on a home in the Annex that was sold a decade and a half ago at three hundred thousand and just now went for 1.5 million.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the first time that an exoplanet, HR 8799e, has been directly observed using optical interferometry.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the possibility, demonstrated by the glimpsing of a circumplanetary disc around exoplanet PDS 70b, that we might be seeing a moon system in formation.
  • The Citizen Science Salon looks what observers in Antarctica are contributing to our wealth of scientific knowledge.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to articles looking at the latest findings on the Precambrian Earth.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas writes about his ambivalent response to a Twitter that, by its popularity, undermines the open web.
  • Gizmodo notes that NASA is going to open up the International Space Station to tourists.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how croquet, upon its introduction in the 19th century United States, was seen as scandalous for the way it allowed men and women to mix freely.
  • Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the unaccountable fondness of at least two Maine Republican legislators for the Confederacy.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the economic success of Israel in recent decades is a triumph of neoliberalism.
  • Stephen Ellis at the NYR Daily writes about the gymnastics of Willem de Kooning.
  • Drew Rowsome profiles out comic Brendan D’Souza.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the still strange galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, apparently devoid of dark matter.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever shares his theory about a fixed quantity of flavor in strawberries of different sizes.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a contentious plan for a territorial swap between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Koreans, Italians, Irish, Albino Carreira, #threetorontos

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  • This 2013 Toronto Guardian article explains how the Korean community in Toronto can trace its origins to early 20th century missionaries from Canada.
  • At Spacing, Daniel Panneton writes about the rise of fascism in Italian Toronto and the very different reactions to this ideology’s rise.
  • CBC Toronto reports on the popular new app Irish App-roved, aimed at helping new immigrants from Ireland get oriented in Toronto.
  • Jacob Lorinc at the Toronto Star tells the story of Albino Carreira, a Portuguese-Canadian construction worker disabled by a construction incident in the 1990s who went on to whimsically decorate his Clinton Street home and his bug-covered van.
  • The growing racialization of poverty in Toronto is a huge ongoing concern. The Toronto Star reports.