A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘public art

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Doug Ford, Parkdale development, TTC cell, Kaboom Chicken, 7/11

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  • Aaron Hutchins reports on the potential of the upcoming Doug Ford campaign in Toronto to reveal the strength, or not, of populism in Canada.
  • Jesse Winter reports at The Globe and Mail on how the redevelopment of a warehouse at Queen and Dufferin, in Parkdale, is set to displace the artists and creators now based there.
  • Ben Spurr notes that, although the entire TTC now has cell service, only Freedom Mobile–not any of the big three–has signed a contract to let users take advantage of this, over at the Toronto Star.
  • blogTO notes that the decision of restaurant Kaboom Chicken to blame price increases on the minimum wage increase has met with a negative reaction.
  • Narcity notes that some east-end 7/11 stores have shut down suddenly, apparently because of minimum wage increases.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares beautiful images of nebula Sharpless 2-29, brilliant and beautiful from the heart of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how New Horizons is maneuvering for its rendezvous with KBO MU69 on 1 January 2019.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how Indian schools were at once vehicles for the assimilation of American indigenous peoples and also sites for potential resistance.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the vintage Vampirella art of Enrique Torres-Prat.
  • From Tumblr, Explain It Like I’m Not From Lawrence looks at a very unusual tower in the downtown of that Kansas community.
  • Hornet Stories notes that PrEP is becoming available in Brazil, but only for a small subset of potential users.
  • Imageo notes a recent American study observing that the degree of Arctic heating is in at least two millennia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Bermuda has repealed marriage equality. I can’t help but think this will not help the island’s tourism.
  • Language Hat links to a new encyclopedia article examining the origins of the Japanese language. I’m surprised the article suggests there are no verifiable links to Korean, Paekche aside.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has an after-action report on the Alabama senate election. I agree with most of the conclusions–certainly it shows a need to contest every election!
  • Allan Metcalf at Lingua Franca quite likes the term “fake news” for its specific power, claiming it as his word of 2017.
  • The NYR Daily reflects on an exhibition of the powerful works of Modigliani.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on some infrared images taken by Juno of Jupiter and volcanic Io.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares 21 pieces of advice for people interested in visiting Iran as tourists.
  • Towleroad’s list of the Top 10 albums of 2017 is worth paying attention to.
  • If this Window on Eurasia report is correct and HIV seroprevalence in Russia is twice the proportion officially claimed, 1.5% of the population …

[PHOTO] Looking up from the Market Level at The Three Watchmen

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777 Bay Street, a thirty-story tower attached to the main building of College Park in 1984, may be architecturally unadventurous. Its atrium does serve as a wonderful display area for Haida artist Robert Davidson‘s The Three Watchmen, the glass and mirrors of the atrium interior contrasting nicely with the carved wood.

Looking up from the Market Level #toronto #collegepark #777bay #atrium #mirror #glass #totempole #architecture #design

Written by Randy McDonald

December 14, 2017 at 11:30 am

[NEWS] Five links about ethnic conflict: language in Canada, wilderness, Catalonia, Czechs on Tibet

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  • CBC notes that major First Nations languages in Canada like Cree and Ojibwe may soon be supported by translators in the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa.
  • Julian Brave NoiseCat at VICE argues against an imagining of wilderness that imagines territories without indigenous peoples. Such too readily can enable abuse of the natural world.
  • Bloomberg notes how the Spanish authorities in Catalonia have overriden local governments and populations by transferring dispute art objects to a different Spanish region. This won’t end well.
  • Transitions Online notes how traditionally strong Czech support for Tibet and Tibetan exiles has been fading in recent years, with China becoming a bigger player.
  • Paul Wells at MacLean’s takes a look at what might be the latest round of the language debate in Montréal. How important are greetings? (I think, for the record, they might be more important than Wells argues.)

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait answers the question of why asteroids tend to explode high in atmosphere.
  • Centauri Dreams carries Keith Cooper’s suggestion that METI activists should wait until the first generation of detailed exoplanet investigations give an idea as to what is out there before they begin transmitting.
  • The Crux notes how indigenous peoples in Guyana use drones to defend their land claims.
  • JSTOR Daily summarizes an article on the sexually radical and politically progressive Kansas freethinkers, subject even to death threats.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the question of who benefits from automotion in early 21st century society.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in the Second World War, American missionaries also became interrogators thanks to their knowledge.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas, linking to an article on #elsagate, notes how many video creators were making content not for human audiences but rather to please YouTube algorithms.
  • Language Log deals with one manifestation of the controversy over the use of “they” as a gender-neutral first-person singular pronoun.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terribly suspicious denial of anti-Semitism from Roy Moore’s wife. Alabamans, vote against this man.
  • The LRB Blog shares Gill Partington’s examination of some modern art exhibits dealing with the mechanics of reading.
  • Russell Darnley of maximos62 examines how Human Rights Day, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed on 10 December 1948, is not the only important date in international human rights history.
  • The NYR Daily notes how Donald Trump’s actions have only worsened the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from a visit to England.
  • Spacing shares an article by Sean Ruthen examining the dynamic difference of the different cities of Italy, based on the author’s recent trip there.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how young massive black hole J1342+0928 poses a challenge.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the main demographic challenges for the Baltic States these days are not so much ethnic conflicts but rather population aging and emigration.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at timeless similarities between classics of homoerotic art and modern-day gay photography. NSFW, obviously.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthropology net reports on the unveiling of Little Foot, a 3.6 million year old australopithecus skeleton.
  • The Big Picture unveiled remarkable photos of the ongoing wildfires in southern California.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a suggestion of Jim Benford suggesting we are not transmitting loudly enough to be picked up across interstellar distances.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of genes which appear to have some relationship to sexual orientation variation among human men.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how DNA evidence can lead to false convictions.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some links about extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that an opposite-sex couple in Australia who promised to divorce on the advent of marriage equality have opted not to. Surprise, surprise.

  • The Map Room Blog shares some maps examining the possibility of an electoral upset in the Alabama Senate race.
  • Marginal Revolution points out the extent to which Chicago was a huge boomtown in the 19th century.
  • The NYR Daily shares the proletarian art–literally–of Chaïm Soutine.
  • Out There takes a look at how our ill treatment of gorillas bodes ill for our treatment of hypothetical less advanced aliens.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Moscow, without restrictions on urban migration, is starting to develop ethnic neighbourhoods. (I think this natural, and fundamentally a good thing, unlike the source.)
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a report of a 1971 jam session of John Lennon with Frank Zappa.

[URBAN NOTE] Four city links: Kingston, New York City, Los Angeles, Beijing

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  • Kingston is currently in the process of planning for two tall high-rises to be built in what seems to be near the heart of the downtown. Global News reports.
  • The question of how New York City will deal with the extended shutdown of the L Train seems, from this account, to have scarcely been answered. VICE reports.
  • The defenses of Los Angeles’ Getty Museum against wildfires are impressive, though I certainly still fear for the art inside. New York reports.
  • The displacement of poor people, often rural migrants, from their Beijing neighbourhoods is a sad story. The Guardian reports.