A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘public art

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Antipope Charlie Stross takes a look at the parlous state of the world, and imagines what if the US and UK went differently.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Sirius, including white dwarf Sirius B.
  • Centauri Dreams considers Cassini’s final function, as a probe of Saturn’s atmosphere.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that diamonds rain deep in Neptune (and Uranus).
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on a NASA scientist’s argument that we need new interstellar probes, not unlike Voyager 1.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the way a course syllabus is like a Van Halen contract rider.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the palimpsests of St. Catherine’s Monastery, deep in the Sinai.
  • Language Log looks at the etymology, and the history, of chow mein.
  • The LRB Blog recounts a visit to Mount Rushmore in the era of Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at the question of why Mexico isn’t enjoying higher rates of economic growth.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers the extent to which politics these days is just sound and fury, meaning nothing.
  • Mark Simpson links to an essay of his explaining why we should be glad the Smiths broke up in 1987.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle considers the import, to him and the environment, of a spring near his cottage.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the abundance of black holes in our galaxy, more than one hundred million.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that smoking marijuana might–might–have sexual benefits.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument that ethnic Russians in Russia share issue in common with whites in America, and reports on an argument made by one man that ethnic Russians in republics need not learn local languages.

[PHOTO] Colour in St. James Town

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Colour in St. James Town

Written by Randy McDonald

August 9, 2017 at 7:00 am

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Ken Pagan to real estate to Leslie Street Spit to Blockobana

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  • This U>long-form CBC article looking at Ken Pagan, the man who became infamous through his beer can toss, has insight.
  • I like Christopher Hume’s article describing changes of zoning around apartment highrises, to allow shops.
  • John Lorinc’s suggestion that taxes collected from foreign buyers be put towards social housing is provocative.
  • Robert Zunke is the man, sometime construction worker, assembling shrines on the Leslie Street spit.
  • Torontoist describes Blockobana, the queer black space at this year’s Toronto Caribbean Festival.

[NEWS] Five culture links, from the ambivalent Internet, to ancient Chinese text, to LGBTQ history

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  • I liked this Vice article on a study of the prevalence of ambivalence on the Internet. How will we learn to care?
  • Global News reports that the National Museum of Chinese Writing is willing to pay people who can decipher oracle bones three thousand years old.
  • CBC reports on an organization of LGBTQ farmers in Québec, Fierté Agricole.
  • Alex Needham writes at The Guardian about the life and work of Touko Laaksonen, “Tom of Finland.”
  • VICE’s take on Cecilia Aldonrondo’s documentary about the life of her dead gay uncle is touching.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Bakhtinian Caribana to climate and environment to Leslie Spit

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  • Spacing hosts Cheryl Thompson’s article examining Toronto’s Caribbean festival as a Bakhtinian organized chaos.
  • VICE examines how social housing in Canada will be hard-hit by climate change, including rising temperatures.
  • Torontoist shares a sponsored guide to attractions in the Ontario Greenbelt.
  • Laura Howells at the Toronto Star notes that if garlic mustard has to be an invasive plant in the forests of Ontario, at least it helps that it is a tasty invader.
  • Julien Gignac reports on the mystery of who the artist building shrines at Leslie Spit actually is.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from strange disappearances to the Toronto Islands to odd suburbs

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  • James Dubro highlights at Torontoist the disappearing queer men of Toronto. Is a serial killer at work?
  • At the Toronto Star, Paul Hunter reports on how the Toronto Islands have been reopened starting today.
  • John Lorinc’s investigation of high-rise safety in Toronto is alarming, and ends here and here.
  • Scott Wheeler looks at the controversial mounted cow sculpture of Cathedraltown, in Markham.
  • Victoria Gibson reports on the $150 million a year spent by the federal government at Pickering on property never used to build an airport.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin considers imaginable ways to get carbon dioxide in the atmosphere down to 350 ppm by 2100.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the tenuous nature of the upper-middle class in America. How is downwards mobility to be avoided, even here?
  • Imageo shows the growth of a sunspot larger than the Earth.
  • Language Hat shares the story of how Manchu script came to be.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the working poor need protection from arbitrary and always-changing work schedules.
  • The LRB Blog notes the geopolitical scramble at the Horn of Africa, starting with bases in Djibouti.
  • The NYR Daily engages with an intriguing exhibition about the relationship between Henry James and paintings, and painting.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw engages with the classic 1937 Australian film, Lovers and Luggers.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money notes that one benefit of the trend towards greater informality in fashion is that time has been freed up, especially for women.
  • Peter Rukavina writes about his new Instagram account, hosting his various sketches.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the continuing problems with Germany’s adoption laws for same-sex couples.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how the Polish president saved the independence of Poland’s courts with his veto.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia is trying to mobilize the ethnic Russians of Lithuania, finally.