A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘rail

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: street art, journalism, police, Cheri DiNovo, transit at Dundas West

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  • CBC notes that the Yonge and Dundas street artist scene is closing down under city regulations, including permits.
  • Emily Mathieu talks about how she conducts her journalism with some of Toronto’s most marginalized as subjects.
  • The Globe and Mail notes the local controversy over having police officers permanently stationed in schools.
  • The idea that police who actively undermine the Special Investigations Unit should be seriously punished seems obvious.
  • Veteran NDP politican and LGBTQ rights advocate Cheri DiNovo is leaving politics to become a minister in church.
  • Finally, the Dundas West TTC station will be connected to the GO Transit hub less than 300 metres away!
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[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: East Chinatown, Leslieville and east, Kirby GO, TTC, Eden Smith

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  • blogTO argues East Chinatown, at Broadview and Gerrard, is an up-and-coming neighbourhood.
  • East-end Toronto, from Leslieville to points east, definitely is up-and-coming. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • It looks like the Kirby GO Station was approved for political reasons, not because of actual local need. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Steve Munro notes that, on the 23rd, the TTC Overhead Shop will have an open house explaining the streetcars’ pantograph.
  • In July, Torontoist looked at Toronto architect Eden Smith, connected to the Arts and Crafts Movement in Canada.

[URBAN NOTE] Three notes about the future of mass transit and infrastructure in Toronto

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  • blogTO notes an exciting open house on the 28th of October for three of the new University Line subway stations.
  • Alex Bozikovic praises the architectural innovation behind the new stations on the Eglinton Crosstown line.
  • Christopher Hume’s argument (from August) that Toronto will, despite itself, have to invest in its future works.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • blogTO lists some interesting things to do and see in Toronto’s American neighbour, Buffalo.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly strongly defends contemporary journalism as essential for understanding the world.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money rightly takes issue with the claim identity politics hinders the US left. Remember New Deal coalitions?
  • Marginal Revolution notes just how expensive it is to run Harvard.
  • Otto Pohl notes the upcoming 76th anniversary of the Soviet deportation of the Volga Germans.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer reports on the remarkably fluent code-switching between English and French of some Washington D.C. subway riders.
  • Strange Maps notes rival food and fabric maps of India and Pakistan.
  • Tricia Wood at Torontoist argues that, for environmental and economic reasons, Ontario needs high-speed rail.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Tatarstan has done a poor job of defending its sovereignty from the Russian government.

[URBAN NOTE] Two mass transit links, from awkwardly rising London to Robert Moses in New York City

  • In The New York Times, Michael Kimmelman reports on the Crossrail mass transit line in London. It sounds promising, even in the era of Brexit.
  • Emily Nonko at Curbed argues that the underfunding of mass transit in NYC by Robert Moses is the cause of the current crisis.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 31, 2017 at 11:59 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Stepgate to Emanuel Jaques to mass transit

    Torontoist’s feature on how Stepgate went viral internationally is a mustread.

  • The National Post covers a disturbing report about claiming a police officer maimed a teenager. If the Toronto police have been actively trying to cover up criminal assault by one of their members …
  • Global News notes that Metrolinx has opted to remove Bombardier for consideration in operating GO Transit.
  • A high-speed ferry link between Toronto and Niagara–St. Catherine’s–is imaginable. Economically viable? The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Simon Lewsen describes in The Globe and Mail how the 1977 murder of Emanuel Jaques led, eventually, to the transformation of Yonge Street.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.
  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.
  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.