A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘refugees

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

leave a comment »

  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} shares a new take on the atmosphere, as a common good.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a photo of Earth taken from a hundred million kilometres away by the OSIRIS-REx probe.
  • The Crux tells the story of how the first exoplanets were found.
  • D-Brief notes that life could be possible on a planet orbiting a supermassive black hole, assuming it could deal with the blueshifting.
  • io9 looks at the latest bold move of Archie Comics.
  • JSTOR Daily explores cleaning stations, where small fish clean larger ones.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the role China seeks to play in a remade international order.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the new upcoming national atlas of Estonia.
  • Marginal Revolution touches on the great ambition of Louis XIV for a global empire.
  • Steve Baker of The Numerati shares photos from his recent trip to Spain.
  • Anya Schiffrin at the NRY Daily explains how American journalist Varian Fry helped her family, and others, escape the Nazis.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the classic movie The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a map looking at the barriers put up by the high-income world to people moving from outside.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers the complex question of how, exactly, the density of a black hole can be measured.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever reviews Gemini Man. Was the high frame rate worth it?
  • Window on Eurasia notes the deep hostility of Tuvins towards a large Russian population in Tuva.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the existential question of self-aware cartoon characters.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Westerlund-1, a massive star cluster with many bright stars in our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a finding that giant planets like Jupiter are less likely to be found around Sun-like stars.
  • D-Brief notes how, in a time of climate change, birds migrated between Canada and the equator.
  • Bruce Dorminey lists five overlooked facts about the Apollo 11 mission.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that the US House of Representatives has approved the creation of a US Space Corps analogous to the Marines.
  • JSTOR Daily considers tactics to cure groupthink.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution, looking at the experience of Hong Kong, observes how closely economic freedoms depend on political freedom and legitimacy.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog explains his rationale for calculating that the Apollo project, in 2019 dollars, cost more than $US 700 billion.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the star R136a1, a star in the 30 Doradus cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud that is the most massive star known to exist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Circassians in Syria find it very difficult to seek refuge in their ancestral lands in the North Caucasus.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks, in occasionally NSFW detail, at the importance of June the 16th for him as a date.

[DM] Some links: immigration, cities, small towns, French Canada, Eurasia, China, Brexit, music

Another links post is up over at Demography Matters!

  • Skepticism about immigration in many traditional receiving countries appeared. Frances Woolley at the Worthwhile Canadian Initiative took issue with the argument of Andray Domise after an EKOS poll, that Canadians would not know much about the nature of migration flows. The Conversation observed how the rise of Vox in Spain means that country’s language on immigration is set to change towards greater skepticism. Elsewhere, the SCMP called on South Korea, facing pronounced population aging and workforce shrinkages, to become more open to immigrants and minorities.
  • Cities facing challenges were a recurring theme. This Irish Examiner article, part of a series, considers how the Republic of Ireland’s second city of Cork can best break free from the dominance of Dublin to develop its own potential. Also on Ireland, the NYR Daily looked at how Brexit and a hardened border will hit the Northern Ireland city of Derry, with its Catholic majority and its location neighbouring the Republic. CityLab reported on black migration patterns in different American cities, noting gains in the South, is fascinating. As for the threat of Donald Trump to send undocumented immigrants to sanctuary cities in the United States has widely noted., at least one observer noted that sending undocumented immigrants to cities where they could connect with fellow diasporids and build secure lives might actually be a good solution.
  • Declining rural settlements featured, too. The Guardian reported from the Castilian town of Sayatón, a disappearing town that has become a symbol of depopulating rural Spain. Global News, similarly, noted that the loss by the small Nova Scotia community of Blacks Harbour of its only grocery store presaged perhaps a future of decline. VICE, meanwhile, reported on the very relevant story about how resettled refugees helped revive the Italian town of Sutera, on the island of Sicily. (The Guardian, to its credit, mentioned how immigration played a role in keeping up numbers in Sayatón, though the second generation did not stay.)
  • The position of Francophone minorities in Canada, meanwhile, also popped up at me.
  • This TVO article about the forces facing the École secondaire Confédération in the southern Ontario city of Welland is a fascinating study of minority dynamics. A brief article touches on efforts in the Franco-Manitoban community of Winnipeg to provide temporary shelter for new Francophone immigrants. CBC reported, meanwhile, that Francophones in New Brunswick continue to face pressure, with their numbers despite overall population growth and with Francophones being much more likely to be bilingual than Anglophones. This last fact is a particularly notable issue inasmuch as New Brunswick’s Francophones constitute the second-largest Francophone community outside of Québec, and have traditionally been more resistant to language shift and assimilation than the more numerous Franco-Ontarians.
  • The Eurasia-focused links blog Window on Eurasia pointed to some issues. It considered if the new Russian policy of handing out passports to residents of the Donbas republics is related to a policy of trying to bolster the population of Russia, whether fictively or actually. (I’m skeptical there will be much change, myself: There has already been quite a lot of emigration from the Donbas republics to various destinations, and I suspect that more would see the sort of wholesale migration of entire families, even communities, that would add to Russian numbers but not necessarily alter population pyramids.) Migration within Russia was also touched upon, whether on in an attempt to explain the sharp drop in the ethnic Russian population of Tuva in the 1990s or in the argument of one Muslim community leader in the northern boomtown of Norilsk that a quarter of that city’s population is of Muslim background.
  • Eurasian concerns also featured. The Russian Demographics Blog observed, correctly, that one reason why Ukrainians are more prone to emigration to Europe and points beyond than Russians is that Ukraine has long been included, in whole or in part, in various European states. As well, Marginal Revolution linked to a paper that examines the positions of Jews in the economies of eastern Europe as a “rural service minority”, and observed the substantial demographic shifts occurring in Kazakhstan since independence, with Kazakh majorities appearing throughout the country.
  • JSTOR Daily considered if, between the drop in fertility that developing China was likely to undergo anyway and the continuing resentments of the Chinese, the one-child policy was worth it. I’m inclined to say no, based not least on the evidence of the rapid fall in East Asian fertility outside of China.
  • What will Britons living in the EU-27 do, faced with Brexit? Bloomberg noted the challenge of British immigrant workers in Luxembourg faced with Brexit, as Politico Europe did their counterparts living in Brussels.
  • Finally, at the Inter Press Service, A.D. Mackenzie wrote about an interesting exhibit at the Musée de l’histoire de l’immigration in Paris on the contributions made by immigrants to popular music in Britain and France from the 1960s to the 1980s.

[ISL] Five #islands links: St. Vincent, Orkneys, Hong Kong, Kiribati, Manus

  • The Inter Press Service reports on efforts to keep the fisheries of St. Vincent active, despite climate change.
  • This Guardian report on the sheer determination of the librarians of the Orkneys to service their community, even in the face of giant waves, is inspiring.
  • I am decidedly impressed by the scope of the Hong Kong plan to build a vast new artificial island. The Guardian reports.
  • This Inter Press Service report about how the stigma of leprosy in Kiribati prevents treatment is sad, and recounts a familiar phenomenon.
  • That Behrouz Boochani was able to write an award-winning book on Whatsapp while imprisoned in the Australian camp on Manus island is an inspiring story that should never have been. CBC’s As It Happens reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Québec City, Fort Lee, Vancouver, Paris and Saint-Denis, Sutera

  • Le Devoir wonders if excessive tourism will make Vieux-Québec unlivable for locals.
  • Sam Sklar at CityLab, native of the New Jersey community of Fort Lee, wonders when it will burst out from the shadow of New York City.
  • The question of how Vancouver in the era of legalization will celebrate 4/20 remains actively contested. The National Post reports.
  • CityLab reports on how the 2024 Paris Olympics may help regenerate Saint-Denis.
  • The story about how resettled refugees helepd revive the Italian town of Sutera, on the island of Sicily, needs to be better-known. VICE reports.

[ISL] Five #PEI links: Biovectra, Syrian refugees, Crapaud vs Kinkora, telehealth, Jed Mackay

  • The nearly forty million dollars of federal government investment promised for PEI biotech firm Biovectra is a substantial investment indeed. The Guardian reports.
  • The Guardian reports the reunification of a family of Syrian refugees on the Island.
  • Peter Rukavina notes and explains the significant differences, cultural and religious, between the neighbouring PEI communities of Crapaud and Kinkora.
  • The western PEI community of Alberton, faced with doctor shortages, has been experimenting with telehealth. The National Post explains.
  • CBC Prince Edward Island reports on Jed Mackay, an Islander currently writing for Marvel’s Daredevil.

[NEWS] Five politics links: Canadian navy, Chemi Lhamo, refugee chocolate, Brexit, Ireland

  • Is the culture of the Canadian navy that much of an obstacle to the retention of personnel? Global News reports.
  • That Chemi Lhamo, a Tibetan-Canadian student who was elected student president of the University of Toronto’s Scarborough campus, has come under attacks coordinated through Chinese social media on account of her heritage is disturbing. CBC reports.
  • A successful Nova Scotia chocolatier founded by Syrian refugees is set to take on new refugee hires. The National Post reports.
  • Pankaj Mishra writing at The New York Times is, perhaps unkind but not wrong, in suggesting that the bad habits of Britain’s imperial elites are finally rebounding on Britain in this mismanaged Brexit.
  • Andrew Gallagher writes at Slugger O’Toole about the impossibility of Ireland ever having good boundaries through any imaginable partition.