A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘religion

[NEWS] Some Monday links

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  • Bloomberg observes Iran’s boycott of the hajj and Iranian hopes for relatively strong economic growth this year, looks at the impact of Middle Eastern economic decline on Thai hospitals, and notes the absence of IKEA from Ukraine.
  • CBC notes retesting has revealed eight Russian athletes who used banned substances at the London Olympics.
  • Foreign Policy looks at the human-caused Sidoarjo mud volcano in Indonesia.
  • MacLean’s notes a push in Montréal for a memorial to Irish immigrants killed by typhus.
  • The National Post notes that Sun Life will stop treating pot users as smokers and start treating them as users of medicine.
  • Open Democracy is critical of Iran’s open-ended military objectives in Syria, given their human toll.
  • Spiegel investigates Russia’s support of the Euroskeptic AfD party.

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto’s black history unearthed in excavation of landmark church”

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John Lorinc reports for the Toronto Star about a fascinating dig on the site of an old African Canadian church, the British Methodist Episcopal church in the middle of Toronto.

It has been called “one of the most important blocks of black history in Toronto,” a place where African Americans, fleeing slavery, found refuge to live, work and worship.

On this tract of land, just north of Osgoode Hall, a handful of African Methodists built a small wood frame church in 1845. It served as the spiritual and political centre of the city’s growing black community, which was asserting its voice in the abolitionist movement and welcoming an influx of families seeking freedom via the Underground Railroad.

Eventually, the congregation outgrew the tiny church and replaced it with a handsome brick temple. But after more than a century, membership dwindled, the congregation moved and the temple was sold off. In the late 1980s, the building was demolished to make way for a parking lot and, until last fall, the church was largely forgotten.

Now, with that same lot being prepared for the development of a new state-of-the-art provincial courthouse, the rich history of Chestnut St.’s British Methodist Episcopal Church has resurfaced, along with that of the 19th-century neighbourhood surrounding it.

Hundreds of thousands of artifacts have been discovered at the 0.65-hectare site — larger than a football field — near University Ave. and Dundas St. Infrastructure Ontario, the government agency overseeing construction, provided the Toronto Star with unique access to the five-month dig, considered one of the most extensive urban archeological projects in North America.

Unearthed ceramics, tools, toys and remnants of clothing are helping to compose a fascinating and largely untold story of the distant origins of Toronto’s diversity.

“Archeology often becomes the voice for the people without history,” says Holly Martelle, the consulting archeologist for the dig.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 23, 2016 at 11:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond considers the floating mountains of Pluto.
  • The Boston Globe‘s Big Picture notes the story of a church that transitioned from an old-style church building to a storefront.
  • blogTO shares a photo of the Gardiner Expressway, closed for construction.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the search for life around red giant stars.
  • Crooked Timber criticizes left-wing Brexit proponents for the contradictions in their politics.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at mountain-building on Io.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas wonders if the kids are all right in an age of ubiquitous technology.
  • The LRB Blog notes Trump’s acceptance by Fox.
  • Otto Pohl shares a list of his articles dealing with the Crimean Tatars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines air pollution and car traffic in Mexico City.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the political popularity of Sufis in Dagestan.
  • Arnold Zwicky celebrates actor Joe Dallesandro.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Bloomberg looks at Argentina’s push for renewable energy, reports on Rosatom’s interest in developing South Africa as an entry into the African nuclear market, writes about China’s opposition to anything remotely like separatism in Hong Kong, and looks at Poland’s demand for an apology for Bill Clinton critical of the new government.
  • Bloomberg View notes the importance of honest statistics in Brazil, and calls for American arms sales to a friendly Vietnam.
  • CBC notes new Conservative support for a transgender rights bill and reports on how Ontario’s climate policy will hit Alberta’s natural gas exports.
  • Gizmodo notes Portugal has just managed to power itself entirely on renewable energy for four days.
  • The Inter Press Service describes the Middle Eastern refugee crisis.
  • The National Post looks at a proposed New York State ban on declawing cats.
  • Open Democracy reports on Norway’s EU status via a left-leaning Norwegian, looks at the life of Daniel Berrigan, and notes the emergent Saudi-Indian alliance.
  • Universe Today describes the circumstellar habitable zones of red giants.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about intermittent fasting as a weight loss method.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the Ukrainian victory in Eurovision.
  • Language Hat notes one Persian monarch’s problems with getting good translators.
  • Language Log looks at Singlish, the Singaporean variant of English.
  • Marginal Revolution compares tax fraud in Sweden and Italy.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on interesting brain scans conducted of someone having a mystic religious experience.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one brutal economic prediction for Russia, projecting sustained decline with only major cities resisting.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at homoerotic photos of men dressed as unicorns.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO notes that the Canadian government has prevented Conrad Black from selling his Forest Hill mansion on account of taxes.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a beautiful 1981 live performance by The Church.
  • Language Log notes the inclusion of Singaporean and Hong Kong English words into the OED.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the four Italian nuns who helped the Vatican map prt of the sky.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the increasing concentration of the Quakers in Kenya, and by extension other Christian denominations in Africa.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the success of solar energy in Mexico.
  • Strange Maps notes the history of Middle Eastern migration into Europe.
  • Torontoist looks at a Kensington Market project displaying graffiti from around the world.
  • Towleroad notes Donald Trump’s refusal to reveal his tax returns.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the role played by Vladimir Zhirinovsky in Russian politics.
  • Zero Geography links to a paper co-authored by the blogger looking at the online representation of Jerusalem.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • blogTO notes a new union for Toronto freelancers.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a Chinese ban on live streams of women eating bananas seductively.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper purporting to provide ways for telescopes to distinguish between exo-Venuses and exo-Earths.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a study modelling the collision between Theia and the proto-Earth that created the moon.
  • Language Log notes Chinese colloquialisms.
  • The LRB Blog reflects on the environmental and political implications of the Fort McMurray fire.
  • Marginal Revolution recommends postponing tourism to some exotic destinations until they build up the needed infrastructure.
  • The NYRB Daily introduces readers to the Weimar-era novel Grand Hotel.
  • I disagree with Peter Watts’ argument that things need to get worse before they get better.
  • North!’s Justin Petrone reflects on his experience of the esoteric in Estonia.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the importance of the Soviet victory in the Second World War as a way of justifying Russian hegemony.
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