A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘religion

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly photoblogs about her trip to Berlin.
  • Dead Things reports on a recent study that unraveled the evolutionary history of the domestic cat.
  • James Nicoll notes that his niece and nephew will each be performing theatre in Toronto.
  • Language Hat has an interesting link to interviews of coders as if they were translators.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at Chinese video game competitions and Chinese tours to Soviet revolutionary sites.
  • Steve Munro shares photos of the old Kitchener trolleybus.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of the Ramadan drummer of Coney Island.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay arguing that photographed subjects should provide they consent and receive renumeration.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Trans March.
  • Towleroad notes the cancellation of anti-gay convictions of Nazis.
  • Van Waffle shows the stories of the caterpillars in his backyard.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts an essay talking about the difficulties of translating the Book of Genesis.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith points to his blog post about the strengths of the chosen families of queer people, in life and in his fiction.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling revisits the politics behind France’s Minitel network, archaic yet pioneering.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly blogs about meeting her online friends in real life. Frankly, it would never occur to me not to do that.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how Kepler’s exoplanets fall neatly into separate classes, super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.
  • The LRB Blog has a terrible report from Grenfell Tower, surrounded by betrayed survivors and apocalypse.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the inclusion of Canada’s First Nations communities on Google Maps.
  • The NYRB Daily’s Robert Cottrell explores the banalities revealed by Oliver Stone’s interviews of Putin.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis considers the likely gains and challenges associated with missions to the ice giants of Uranus and Neptune.
  • Towleroad notes the new Alan Cumming film After Louie, dealing with a romance between an ACT-UP survivor and a younger man
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Ilya Somin does not find much good coming from Trump’s announced Cuba policy.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the threat posed by Orthodox Christian fundamentalists in Russia.

[NEWS] Seven links, from Tibetan Parkdale and Ontario politics to dangerous Mars and Big Oil’s end

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  • The New York Times‘ Michael Wilson tells the sad story of how a woman murdered in Harlem was only identified 47 years later.
  • In NOW Toronto, Gelek Badheytsang writes about the complexities surrounding the visit of the 17th Karmapa to Tibetan-heavy Parkdale.
  • Novak Jankovic writes in MacLean’s that there are real declines in the Toronto real estate market, but not enough to set a trend.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Jackie Hong reports that protecting Bluffer’s Park from the waves of Lake Ontario could also wreck an east-end surfing haunt.
  • The National Post reports on how the Ontario NDP claims, probably correctly, that the Wynne Liberals are stealing their ideas. Good for them, I say.
  • Universe Today’s Matt Williams notes a study reporting that life on Mars’ surface is a much greater risk factor for cancer than previously thought.
  • Seth Miller argues that efficient electric cars will push Big Oil through the trauma of Big Coal in the 2020s.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes the first-ever use of Einsteinian gravitational bending to examine the mass of a star.
  • Language Log announces the start of an investigation into the evolving rhetoric of Donald Trump. Something is up.
  • The LRB Blog reports from Tuareg Agadez in Niger, about rebellions and migrant-smuggling.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders what is the rationale for the extreme cut-off imposed on Qatar.
  • Maximos62 wonders about the impact of Indonesia’s fires on not just wildlife but indigenous peoples.
  • Personal Reflections notes the irrelevance of the United States’ withdrawal from Paris, at least from an Australian position.
  • Savage Minds points to a new anthropology podcast.
  • Window on Eurasia notes anti-immigrant sentiment in Moscow and reports on the use of Russia’s anti-extremism laws against Protestants.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bloomberg looks at the recent surge of Chinese investment in Southeast Asia.
  • Culture.pl looks at why Nietzsche falsely claimed Polish ancestry.
  • Foreign Policy suggests that this is a new age of German prominence in the West.
  • The New Yorker finds Amazon’s new brick-and-mortar bookstores lacking.
  • The Toronto Star shares claims that learning a second language provides mental benefits.
  • Universe Today notes the discovery of potentially habitable super-Earth Gliese 625 b.
  • Vice’s Motherboard notes how the popularization of ayahuasca-driven spirit quests has actually hurt traditional users.
  • Vox notes the latest Russia-Ukraine history fight on Twitter.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes the recent municipal vote clearing the way for the construction of the Downtown Relief Line.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly wonders, in the context of growing inequality and poverty, how workers in the United States can be free.
  • Centauri Dreams examines exoplanet TRAPPIST-1h.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the upset of Taiwanese homophobes with the idea of marriage equality and reports on the possibility of a million people dying on account of Trump cuts to HIV/AIDS programs internationally.
  • Language Log considers the use of the emoji in the Sinosphere.
  • The LRB Blog looks at terrorism and the ways it interacts malignly with the news cycle.
  • The NYRB Daily examines the anonymous “Berlin Painter” of ancient Athens.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer argues that the particular structure of health care locks it into certain plausible paths for reform.
  • Torontoist argues that indigenous writers’ concerns about inclusion need to be addressed.
  • Towleroad looks at how some parents of gay children were pushed out of Shanghai’s “marriage market”.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the relative strengths of Ukraine’s two churches and looks at Russia’s trade with North Korea.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines the post-war economic structures of the United Kingdom in the context of struggles between multilateralists and unilateralists.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Beyond the Beyond notes an image of a wooden model of Babbage’s difference engine.
  • James Bow talks about the soundtrack he has made for his new book.
  • Centauri Dreams considers ways astronomers can detect photosynthesis on exoplanets and shares images of Fomalhaut’s debris disk.
  • Crooked Timber looks at fidget spinners in the context of discrimination against people with disabilities.
  • D-Brief notes that Boyajian’s Star began dimming over the weekend.
  • Far Outliers reports on a 1917 trip by zeppelin to German East Africa.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues that there is good reason to be concerned about health issues for older presidential candidates.
  • The NYRB Daily reports on Hungary’s official war against Central European University.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the origins of modern immigration to Russia in internal Soviet migration.
  • Savage Minds shares an ethnographer’s account of what it is like to look to see her people (the Sherpas of Nepal) described.
  • Strange Maps shares a map speculating as to what the world will look like when it is 4 degrees warmer.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that the US Congress does not have authority over immigration.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia’s population will be concentrated around Moscow, compares Chechnya’s position vis-à-vis Russia to Puerto Rico’s versus the United States, and looks at new Ukrainian legislation against Russian churches and Russian social networks.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how Evelyn Waugh’s writings on the Horn of Africa anticipate the “Friedman unit”, the “a measurement of time defined as how long it will take until things are OK in Iraq”.