A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘religion

[NEWS] Four science and technology links: LIGO, Neanderthal genes, Kazuo Ishiguro, AI gods

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  • I bet that, as numerous reports have indicated, LIGO picked up a neutron star collision, with EM traces. D-Brief reports.
  • Neanderthal genes seem to have had a big influence on modern human health. I would be surprised not to have some. National Geographic describes.
  • Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go may evoke crises of bioethics, but I’m not sure it relates to genetic engineering. VICE reports.
  • These apocalyptic visions of technophiles who want to create an artificial intelligence to become god are notable. The Guardian takes a look.
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[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Metropolitan Community Church, Jeff Rock, PFLAG China, Indian lit, Satanism

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  • Hornet Stories looks at the long history of the explicitly LGBTQ-friendly Metropolitan Community Church.
  • Jeff Rock will be the new pastor of Toronto’s Metropolitan Community Church congregation, after Brent Hawkes. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Quartz reports on a PFLAG China cruise, featuring queer people and their parents.
  • Little India reports on the emerging field of gay literature in India, prose and poetry, fiction and non-fiction.
  • The Satanic Temple of Seattle is commissioning anti-gay bakers to bake them pro-Satanism cakes. Religious freedom, right? Bustle tells the story.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: street art, journalism, police, Cheri DiNovo, transit at Dundas West

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  • CBC notes that the Yonge and Dundas street artist scene is closing down under city regulations, including permits.
  • Emily Mathieu talks about how she conducts her journalism with some of Toronto’s most marginalized as subjects.
  • The Globe and Mail notes the local controversy over having police officers permanently stationed in schools.
  • The idea that police who actively undermine the Special Investigations Unit should be seriously punished seems obvious.
  • Veteran NDP politican and LGBTQ rights advocate Cheri DiNovo is leaving politics to become a minister in church.
  • Finally, the Dundas West TTC station will be connected to the GO Transit hub less than 300 metres away!

[URBAN NOTE] Four notes about changing cities in Canada: Hamilton, Edmonton, Cornwall, Antigonish

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  • Hamilton’s Christ Church is striving for continued viability, in part through selling off vacant land for condos. Global News reports.
  • Edmonton’s Accidental Beach, a byproduct of construction berms on the North Saskatchewan River, has gone viral. Global News reports.
  • Meagan Campbell of MacLean’s looks at how the refugee crisis did, and did not, effect the garlic festival of border city Cornwall.
  • The successful integration of a Syrian refugee family of chocolatiers in the Nova Scotia town of Antigonish is nice. The Toronto Star carries the story.

[NEWS] Four links about problematic history: swastika, Cornwallis River, castle restoration, humans

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  • MacLean’s argues that, in Canada and arguably the West generally, it is much too soon to rehabilitate the swastika.
  • Global News reports on a proposal to rename Nova Scotia’s Cornwallis River.
  • This effort to engage in a minimalist, non-misleading restoration of a Spanish castle is controversial.
  • The argument that human history goes back millions of years, and encompass a huger area than thought, is compelling.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the science behind Cassini.
  • Crooked Timber’s Henry Farrell is breaking from Harvard’s Kennedy Centre over its revocation of an invitation to Chelsea Manning.
  • The Crux points to the ways in which the legacy of Cassini will still be active.
  • D-Brief notes that some tool-using macaques of Thailand are overfishing their environment.
  • Hornet Stories notes the eulogy given by Hillary Clinton at the funeral of Edie Windsor.
  • Inkfish notes one way to define separate bird species: ask the birds what they think. (Literally.)
  • The LRB Blog notes the recent passing of Margot Hielscher, veteran German star and one-time crush of Goebbels.
  • The NYR Daily notes the chilling effects on discourse in India of a string of murders of Indian journalists and writers.
  • At the Planetary Science Blog, Emily Lakdawalla bids farewell to the noble Cassini probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a breakfast in Bangladesh complicated by child marriage.
  • Towleroad notes an Australian church cancelled an opposite-sex couple’s wedding because the bride supports equality.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the marmots of, among other places, cosmopolitan and multilingual Swiss canton of Graub√ľnden.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes how the media made a simulation of a third planet at Gliese 832 a discovery of a new Earth-like world.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on a consideration of why schoolchildren are labelled troublemakers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that 51 Eridani b has been discovered to be a cloudy world, and how.
  • Far Outliers notes how the decline of Temasek (the future Singapore) was followed by the rise of Melaka.
  • Hornet Stories tells of an Orthodox Christian priest in Australia, who, at the funeral of a lesbian, called for gays to be shot.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Catalonia’s parliament approved a referendum on secession.
  • The LRB Blog considers the import of Monte Testaccio, a man-made hill of rubble and waste dating from Roman times.
  • The NYR Daily considers the engaging and engaged pop art of Grayson Perry.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a lazy afternoon spent drinking New Zealand beer in a Moscow pub.
  • Towleroad notes an upcoming revealing documentary about Grace Jones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Donbas wars, mercenaries are becoming a major, potentially destabilizing force.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the conflict between quantitative data and qualitative stories in politics.