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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘religion

[PHOTO] Mother Mary in the front garden, Lansdowne Avenue

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Mother Mary in the front garden #toronto #wallaceemerson #lansdowneave #virginmary #statue #garden

This blue-and-white statue of the Virgin Mary standing in the front garden of a home on Lansdowne Avenue, in the heavily Portuguese-Canadian (and even more heavily Roman Catholic) west-end neighbourhood of Wallace Emerson, caught my eye when I was walking down the street on the Saturday before my flight.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 28, 2017 at 6:00 am

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • James Bow considers the idea of Christian privilege.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the oddities of Ross 128.
  • D-Brief shares Matthew Buckley’s proposal that it is possible to make planets out of dark matter.
  • Dead Things reports on the discoveries at Madjedbebe, in northern Australia, suggesting humans arrived 65 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on the idea that advanced civilizations may use sunshades to protect their worlds from overheating. (For terraforming purposes, too.)
  • Language Hat notes the struggles of some Scots in coming up with a rationalized spelling for Scots. What of “hert”?
  • The LRB Blog considers the way in which the unlimited power of Henry VIII will be recapitulated post-Brexit by the UK government.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes the High Park production of King Lear.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the idea that Pluto’s moons, including Charon, might be legacies of a giant impact.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the terrible anti-trans “Civil Rights Uniformity Act.” Americans, please act.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers/u> the perhaps-unique way a sitting American president might be charged with obstruction of justice.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.
  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.
  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the various challenges of being an independent person.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility of a Mars-mass planet in the Kuiper belt.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how the 5Pointz warehouse of NYC, once a graffiti hotspot, has been turned into a condo complex that at best evokes that artistic past.
  • Language Log explores the etymology of “sang”, a descriptor of a Chinese subculture of dispirited youths.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a Border Patrol raid on the No More Deaths encampment in Arizona, a camp that helps save migrant lives in the desert.
  • The Strange Company blogs about the mysterious 1829 disappearance of Judge John Ten Eyck Lansing from New York City.
  • Unicorn Booty describes three gay Muslim immigrants terrified of the implications of President Trump.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers pros and cons to the idea of religious arbitration.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the Qatar crisis is worsening Sunni/Shia tensions among the Muslims of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly photoblogs about her trip to Berlin.
  • Dead Things reports on a recent study that unraveled the evolutionary history of the domestic cat.
  • James Nicoll notes that his niece and nephew will each be performing theatre in Toronto.
  • Language Hat has an interesting link to interviews of coders as if they were translators.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at Chinese video game competitions and Chinese tours to Soviet revolutionary sites.
  • Steve Munro shares photos of the old Kitchener trolleybus.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of the Ramadan drummer of Coney Island.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay arguing that photographed subjects should provide they consent and receive renumeration.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Trans March.
  • Towleroad notes the cancellation of anti-gay convictions of Nazis.
  • Van Waffle shows the stories of the caterpillars in his backyard.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts an essay talking about the difficulties of translating the Book of Genesis.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith points to his blog post about the strengths of the chosen families of queer people, in life and in his fiction.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling revisits the politics behind France’s Minitel network, archaic yet pioneering.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly blogs about meeting her online friends in real life. Frankly, it would never occur to me not to do that.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how Kepler’s exoplanets fall neatly into separate classes, super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.
  • The LRB Blog has a terrible report from Grenfell Tower, surrounded by betrayed survivors and apocalypse.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the inclusion of Canada’s First Nations communities on Google Maps.
  • The NYRB Daily’s Robert Cottrell explores the banalities revealed by Oliver Stone’s interviews of Putin.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis considers the likely gains and challenges associated with missions to the ice giants of Uranus and Neptune.
  • Towleroad notes the new Alan Cumming film After Louie, dealing with a romance between an ACT-UP survivor and a younger man
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Ilya Somin does not find much good coming from Trump’s announced Cuba policy.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the threat posed by Orthodox Christian fundamentalists in Russia.

[NEWS] Seven links, from Tibetan Parkdale and Ontario politics to dangerous Mars and Big Oil’s end

  • The New York Times‘ Michael Wilson tells the sad story of how a woman murdered in Harlem was only identified 47 years later.
  • In NOW Toronto, Gelek Badheytsang writes about the complexities surrounding the visit of the 17th Karmapa to Tibetan-heavy Parkdale.
  • Novak Jankovic writes in MacLean’s that there are real declines in the Toronto real estate market, but not enough to set a trend.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Jackie Hong reports that protecting Bluffer’s Park from the waves of Lake Ontario could also wreck an east-end surfing haunt.
  • The National Post reports on how the Ontario NDP claims, probably correctly, that the Wynne Liberals are stealing their ideas. Good for them, I say.
  • Universe Today’s Matt Williams notes a study reporting that life on Mars’ surface is a much greater risk factor for cancer than previously thought.
  • Seth Miller argues that efficient electric cars will push Big Oil through the trauma of Big Coal in the 2020s.