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Posts Tagged ‘religion

[BLOG] Some politics links

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  • Kieran Healy notes the role of social media in undermining the Turkish coup.
  • Joe. My. God. notes US Army Secretary Eric Fanning’s ride as Grand Marshal in the San Diego pride parade.
  • The LRB Blog notes the aftermath of the Orange Order’s fires in Northern Ireland.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at what might be a veto in Scotland and Northern Ireland on Brexit, and notes the continuing economic fallout.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at how ISIS thrives on chaos.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer reflects on the Turkish coup and notes Trump’s odd Russophilia.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers if it is ever justifiable to overthrow a democratic government.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at instability in the Donbas, suggests Turkey is distracting people from Russia, looks at low levels of Russophone assimilation in Estonia, considers ideological struggles in Belarus, and looks at immigration restrictionism in Russia versus Central Asia.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Astronomy Now notes a white dwarf star that is consuming what looks to be limestone debris from one of its planets. Is this a sign of marine life?
  • Bloomberg notes Rolls-Royce’s opposition to Brexit, notes how international sanctions are hurting Hezbollah, looks at China’s massive spending on infrastructure, notes how Donald Trump has barred the Washington Post from covering his campaign, reports that Sydney and Melbourne have applied extra fees for foreig home-buyers, and notes how a China-funded push to expand sugar production in Ethiopia has hit snags.
  • Bloomberg View looks at the extent to which Germany does not dominate the European Union.
  • CBC notes how anti-gay bigotry is connected to the Orlando shooting, and reports on Peter Mackay’s regrets that Canada did not buy new fighter jets.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that the world’s nuclear arsenal has become smaller but is undergoing modernization.
  • MacLean’s considers barriers to interprovincial trade in Canada and reports on the outrage of a juror on the Stanford sex assault case at the light sentence imposed by the judge.
  • National Geographic looks at the mangrove swamp of Iran’s Qeshm Island.
  • Open Democracy takes issue with the idea that the intervention in Libya was a success, notes reasons for Scotland’s relative liking of the European Union, and looks at the Iranian events of June 1981.
  • Universe Today notes that mammals were flourishing even before the dinosaurs departed.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Bloomberg notes growth in Nigeria’s telecommunications industry and looks about Huawei’s plans to compete with Apple.
  • Bloomberg View looks at India’s advantages over China and considers narrow European definitions of religious liberty.
  • CBC reports that a Japanese boy abandoned in the forests of the north by his parents has been found, and describes plans to restore Kingston’s prison farm.
  • CNBC notes economic desperation among oil-exporting states like Venezuela and Angola.
  • The Inter Press Service looks at the exclusion of LGBT communities from HIV reduction efforts and considers Sri Lankan efforts at food security.
  • The National Post reports on Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s enlistment as conductor of the Metropolitan Opera.
  • Open Democracy considers prospects for a coup in Saudi Arabia.
  • The Toronto Star notes the durability of Kathleen Wynne.
  • Universe Today looks at Tutankhamen’s blade of meteoritic iron.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg notes the rise of populism in Mexico, looks at how Europe is losing its reputation as a renewable energy leader, looks at political protest in Zimbabwe, and looks at changing habits of Saudi oil ministers.
  • Bloomberg View notes the politicization of the Israeli army, looks at an effort to smuggle Korean pop culture into North Korea, and considers strategies to encourage Japanese to have more children.
  • The Globe and Mail considers the risky strategy of marijuana growers, who hope to get the government to back down as they do their thing before legalization.
  • MacLean’s notes that the outcry over the shooting of the gorilla in the Cleveland zoo is misconceived, and reports on Kamal al-Solaylee’s book about being brown.
  • NOW Toronto notes that one argument raised against letting permanent residents vote in Toronto is that Donald Trump allegedly has an apartment here. (Wrong, on multiple grounds.)
  • Open Democracy looks at how British authoritarianism is restrained by the European Union.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • Bloomberg observes Iran’s boycott of the hajj and Iranian hopes for relatively strong economic growth this year, looks at the impact of Middle Eastern economic decline on Thai hospitals, and notes the absence of IKEA from Ukraine.
  • CBC notes retesting has revealed eight Russian athletes who used banned substances at the London Olympics.
  • Foreign Policy looks at the human-caused Sidoarjo mud volcano in Indonesia.
  • MacLean’s notes a push in Montréal for a memorial to Irish immigrants killed by typhus.
  • The National Post notes that Sun Life will stop treating pot users as smokers and start treating them as users of medicine.
  • Open Democracy is critical of Iran’s open-ended military objectives in Syria, given their human toll.
  • Spiegel investigates Russia’s support of the Euroskeptic AfD party.

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto’s black history unearthed in excavation of landmark church”

John Lorinc reports for the Toronto Star about a fascinating dig on the site of an old African Canadian church, the British Methodist Episcopal church in the middle of Toronto.

It has been called “one of the most important blocks of black history in Toronto,” a place where African Americans, fleeing slavery, found refuge to live, work and worship.

On this tract of land, just north of Osgoode Hall, a handful of African Methodists built a small wood frame church in 1845. It served as the spiritual and political centre of the city’s growing black community, which was asserting its voice in the abolitionist movement and welcoming an influx of families seeking freedom via the Underground Railroad.

Eventually, the congregation outgrew the tiny church and replaced it with a handsome brick temple. But after more than a century, membership dwindled, the congregation moved and the temple was sold off. In the late 1980s, the building was demolished to make way for a parking lot and, until last fall, the church was largely forgotten.

Now, with that same lot being prepared for the development of a new state-of-the-art provincial courthouse, the rich history of Chestnut St.’s British Methodist Episcopal Church has resurfaced, along with that of the 19th-century neighbourhood surrounding it.

Hundreds of thousands of artifacts have been discovered at the 0.65-hectare site — larger than a football field — near University Ave. and Dundas St. Infrastructure Ontario, the government agency overseeing construction, provided the Toronto Star with unique access to the five-month dig, considered one of the most extensive urban archeological projects in North America.

Unearthed ceramics, tools, toys and remnants of clothing are helping to compose a fascinating and largely untold story of the distant origins of Toronto’s diversity.

“Archeology often becomes the voice for the people without history,” says Holly Martelle, the consulting archeologist for the dig.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 23, 2016 at 11:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Beyond the Beyond considers the floating mountains of Pluto.
  • The Boston Globe‘s Big Picture notes the story of a church that transitioned from an old-style church building to a storefront.
  • blogTO shares a photo of the Gardiner Expressway, closed for construction.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the search for life around red giant stars.
  • Crooked Timber criticizes left-wing Brexit proponents for the contradictions in their politics.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at mountain-building on Io.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas wonders if the kids are all right in an age of ubiquitous technology.
  • The LRB Blog notes Trump’s acceptance by Fox.
  • Otto Pohl shares a list of his articles dealing with the Crimean Tatars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines air pollution and car traffic in Mexico City.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the political popularity of Sufis in Dagestan.
  • Arnold Zwicky celebrates actor Joe Dallesandro.
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