A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘restaurants

[PHOTO] Coffee Time, Dupont and Lansdowne

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Coffee Time, Dupont and Lansdowne #toronto #wallaceemerson #dupontstreet #lansdowneave #coffeetime

The Coffee Time restaurant located at 1005 Lansdowne Avenue, on the northeastern corner of Lansdowne and Dupont, has long had a bit of a scary reputation. The restaurant’s lone reviewer at Yelp rates it only one star, noting that the crowd hanging out here, in a traditionally poor neighbourhood close to apartment towers once linked to crime including drugs and prositution, is “interesting.”

The transformation of the neighbourhood into one populated by tall condos and relatively affordable rentals is ongoing. Will this Coffee Time survive, or will its legacy be reduced to passing mentions in archived discussion threads about a neigbourhood transformed beyond recognition, like here and here? And what will become of the crowd?

Written by Randy McDonald

July 20, 2017 at 7:30 am

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Lego TTC to private nude beaches to University Avenue

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  • Global News reports on Jackson’s Burger, driven from Yonge Street by high rent.
  • blogTO shares this man’s collection of TTC vehicles done in Lego. It is truly impressive.
  • Steve Munro reports on the cost of renovating the Bloor-Danforth subway.
  • The Toronto Star reports on the private nudist swimming resorts in the GTA. There are no legal public nude beaches without Hanlan’s.
  • The Globe and Mail‘s Dave Leblanc reports on the embattled traffic islands of University Avenue.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Centauri Dreams looks at the potentially deadly effect of the stellar flares of red dwarfs on potentially habitable exoplanets.
  • Charley Ross notes the strange 1957 disappearance of William ad Margaret Patterson from their Texas home.
  • D-Brief notes the evidence for a second planet at Proxima Centauri, a super-Earth Proxima C with a 215 day orbit.
  • Tom Yulsman of ImaGeo shares shares photos of the active Sun.
  • The argument made by Scott Lemieux of Lawyers, Guns and Money that Americans were learning to love Obamacare and Republicans wanted to take it away before they got used to it … well.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that, and why, restaurant servers in Maine wanted their minimum wage lowered. (Tips.)
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of Na De Fo, a rare Korean restaurant in Mexico City.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Macron might try to “California-ize” France, and whether he could pull this off.
  • Unicorn Booty notes studies noting bisexuals have a lower quality of life than gays, and wonders why. (Stigma is an issue.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes that global warming, by leading to permafrost melt, is literally undermining the infrastructure of Russia.

[NEWS] Five links, from Iceland’s skyr to Glasgow’s Tim Hortons to surfing and wine to space probes

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  • Roads and Kingdoms shares Dave Hazzan’s reflections on the yougurt-type (but non-yogurt) Icelandic foodstuff skyr.
  • VICE reports on the scene from Glasgow after the launch of the city Tim Horton’s in Scotland.
  • Bloomberg features Javiera Quiroga’s take on the migration of Chilean vintners south ahead of climate change.
  • VICE notes that climate change will wreck the favourite coastline locations of surfers.
  • Dave Rothery describes at The Conversation how protecting against space probes’ environmental contamination challenges exploration.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links, from streetcar costs to food trucks to sidewalks to Lake Ontario

  • Steve Munro looks at the complex issue of pricing the Queen streetcar. What are its competitors, for starters?
  • Laura Howells reports in the Toronto Star on how Toronto is starting to become packed with food trucks.
  • Alina Bykova reports how Queen West businesses are complaining of, in a novelty, protracted sidewalk construction.
  • Kenny Sharpe and Eric Atkins report in The Globe and Mail on the ongoing accelerated release of Lake Ontario water down the St. Lawrence. How is it going, I wonder?

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto is getting an Anishinaabe restaurant”

Natalia Manzocco writes for NOW Toronto about how Bloor Street West is going to soon host a First Nations restaurant.

When Tacos el Asador vacated their perpetually-packed corner unit on Bloor for roomier digs across the street earlier this year, it turns out they were making space for a cuisine that’s hugely underrepresented in Toronto: First Nations eats. The new tenant at 607 Bloor West is NishDish, a cafe focused on Anishinaabe recipes, as well as products from First Nations and Metis producers.

At the helm of the new cafe is Anishinaabe chef Johl Whiteduck Ringuette, who’s been catering under the NishDish banner for some time, offering dishes like wild duck and hominy corn soups, venison stew, buffalo chili, baked bannock and wild rice. Ringuette promises the “marketeria” will include “Indigenous sourced coffee, quick meals, or check out a vast selection of goods and food products sourced from First Nations, Inuit and Metis people.”

Written by Randy McDonald

February 27, 2017 at 6:00 pm

[CAT] Twelve photos from the TOT Cat Café, 298 College Street

Thursday, when I was walking west along College, I passed by TOT Cat Café (298 College Street, Toronto’s only cat café. I had long been curious about the place, following the different fundraising efforts aiming to set up a cat café in Toronto starting a couple of years ago and then hearing last spring about the scandal when the Toronto Humane Society stopped supplying this cafe with cats for adoption (CBC, Toronto Star, Reddit). The sign outside showed that the cafe was still in operation, and promised. I needed some coffee and could enjoy something sweet, so why not go inside?

Art for sale

The cafe is organized as a sort of double enclosure, the cafe space surrounding the inner double-doored chamber open to the street where the cats reside.

Looking in//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

After I finished my enjoyable coffee and cheesecake, and being briefed on the rules, I passed inside. There were thirteen cats, I was told, most hiding in the carpeted cubby holes at the far end, but some spilling into bowls and on top of ladders in plain view. The cats–apparently sourced by Scarborough Bluffs Cat Relief, part of the effort to retrieve cats and other pets dumped at the Scarborough Bluffs–were available for adoption at a cost of $C 150 per cat. Posters listing the cats’ names, ages, and availability were on the west wall, but the other people there were not paying close attention to those. They were looking at the cats.

Asleep

Looking

Catcave

Resting

Top of the ladder

Ensconced

Curled

Catbowl

Looking out

As far as I could tell, the cats seemed to be in good shape. The staff was clear in laying out the rules–no feeding, no poking, and so on–and the people in the cat enclosure with me obeyed these. The cats, for their parts, seemed both healthy and relaxed, comfortable enough with their environment to sleep and contented with being gazed at from afar. I left not feeling as if I had exploited the cats in an situation unsuited for them–the whole institution seemed to be working out.

Me and cat cafe #toronto #me #selfie #totthecatcafe #collegestreet #harbordvillage #kensingtonmarket

Written by Randy McDonald

February 25, 2017 at 11:00 am