A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘russian language

[NEWS] Five language links: English, French, Gaelic, Cantonese, Russian

leave a comment »

Advertisements

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: New York City, Montréal, Hong Kong, Paris, Narva

  • Hornet Stories has a list of some of the key LGBTQ destinations in New York City. This is something for my next trip, I think.
  • Robert Everett-Green writes about the transformation of Montréal’s Viauville, once a model neighbourhood funded by 19th century cookie magnate Charles-Théodore Viau, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • Hong Kong is exceptionally pressed for space for housing, making land for commerce all the more difficult to come by. Bloomberg reports</u/.
  • France is planning to make a suburban wasteland in the northeast of the conurbation of Paris over into a vast forest. CityLab reports.
  • DW reports on how, one hundred years after Estonia first became independent, the country’s Russophones, particularly concentrated in the northeastern city of Narva, are now engaging with (and being engaged by) the wider country.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Crooked Timber links to John Quiggin’s article in the Guardian about how formerly public companies should be renationalized.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Lockheed has just signed a $US 150 million dollar contract to deliver a 60 kilowatt laser weapon to the US navy by 2020.
  • Hornet Stories ranks the different performances at last night’s Grammies, giving Kesha top placing.
  • JSTOR Daily looks back to contemporary coverage of the 1918 flu epidemic. How did people react, how did they cope?
  • Language Hat looks at a multilingual comic by Japan-born artist Ru Kawahata, Stuck in the Middle.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that, rather than hoping for Trump to perform to minimal expectations in the upcoming State of the Union address, it might be more profitable (and enjoyable?) to wait for the inevitable meltdown. What will it be?
  • Marginal Revolution notes a proposal in Rotterdam for police to arrest people wearing expensive clothes and jewellery and, if they cannot explain where they got them, confiscate them. Of course this policy could not be misused.
  • Towleroad notes that drag queens have quit Burkhart’s, a prominent gay bar in Atlanta, in response to that bar’s owner’s racist and alt-right statements on Facebook.
  • Paul Cassell at the Volokh Conspiracy argues Judge Rosemarie Aquilina was entirely correct in allowing all the victims of Nassar to speak at sentencing.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that radical Islamists are increasingly using Russian to communicate, not the traditional languages of Russia’s Muslim populations. Linguistic assimilation does not equal cultural assimilation.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer reports on Kepler-90, now known to have eight planets.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a model suggesting low-mass worlds like Mars do not stay very habitable for long at all around red dwarf stars.
  • Citizen Science Salon notes how Puerto Ricans are monitoring water quality on their own after Hurricane Maria.
  • The Crux notes how climate change played a role in the fall of Rome. We know more about our environment than the Romans did, but we are not much less vulnerable.
  • D-Brief notes a feature film that has just been made about Ötzi, the man who body was famously found frozen in the Tyrolean Alps five thousand years ago.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how a postage stamp featuring an erupting volcano may have kept Nicaragua from hosting an inter-oceanic canal of its own.
  • Hornet Stories reports on some exciting queer musicians.
  • Language Hat links to an online dictionary of French slang from the 19th century.
  • Language Hat has a post dealing with some controversy created on its author’s perspective on “they” as a singular pronoun. (Language changes, that’s all I have to say on that.)
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a pretty wrong-headed take from a right-wing news source on sexuality and dating and flirting. Gack.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the recent Kepler-90 press release shows how Kepler has reached the limit of the exoplanet science it can do. We need to put better technology at work.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi has some interesting non-spoiler thoughts about the direction of The Last Jedi. I must see this, soon.
  • Window on Eurasia features a blithe dismissal by Putin of the idea that there is language or ethnic conflict at work. Tatars just need to learn Russian, apparently, though they can also keep Tatar as an extra.

[NEWS] Four links from the former Soviet Union: Donbas, Crimean Tatars, Russian nationalism, Yandex

  • Open Democracy reports on what appears to be a coup waged in the Luhansk republic by the forces of Donetsk. What is going on in the twin Donbas republics, anyway?
  • Maxim Edwards reports from the Ukrainian border with Crimea, from Crimean Tatars rebuilding their communities in exile (again), over at Open Democracy.
  • Leonid Bershidsky suggests that the Russian ultranationalism promoted by Putin will remain virulent long after the man is gone, over at Bloomberg.
  • VICE reports on the quietly effective censorship that Russian-language search engine Yandex is forced to employ, here.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how evidence of exoplanets can be found in a spectrum of Van Maanen’s Star taken in 1917.
  • blogTO notes that Michelle Obama is coming to visit Toronto.
  • Dangerous Minds notes that someone has scanned in the copies of 1980s periodical The Twilight Zone Magazine.
  • D-Brief notes the tens of thousands of genders of fungus.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper calculating circumstellar habitable zones and orbits for planets of binary stars.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues it is much too late to retroactively add ethical concerns to new technologies.
  • Language Log notes the struggle of many to pronounce the name of the president of Catalonia, Carles Puigdemont.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes an alarming increase in mass shootings in the US over the past decades.
  • The LRB Blog argues that a moral panic over “pop-up brothels” helps no one involved.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports</u. on Zubaida Tariq, the Martha Stewart of Pakistan.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel likes the new Discovery episode. I wonder, though: hasn’t Trek always been a bit science fantasy?
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russian policies which marginalize non-Russian languages in education may produce blowback.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that interbreeding with Neanderthals restored ancient hominin DNA to homo sapiens.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at signs of planetary formation in cometary rings.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a theory that advanced extraterrestrial civilizations could manipulate pulsars as beacons.
  • Hornet Stories explains what “intersex” means.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the perhaps baffling appeal of Florida real estate at a time of climate change.
  • The LRB Blog considers the radical potential of asteroid mining. Could it help free us from resource scarcity? How should we manage it?
  • Marginal Revolution shares an argument that humans, through transporting life, are increasing biodiversity.
  • The NYR Daily argues that China has too many illusions over its “New Silk Road” initiatives.
  • Peter Rukavina examines the changing shades of green used by GO Transit.
  • Drew Rowsome really likes Toronto musical Bat Out of Hell.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how different non-Russian languages are present on the streets of St. Petersburg.