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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘russian language

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Abell 30, a star that has been reborn in the long process of dying.
  • Centauri Dreams uses the impending launch of LightSail 2 to discuss solar sails in science fiction.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber, as part of a series of the fragility of globalization, considers if migration flows can be reversed. (He concludes it unlikely.)
  • The Crux considers if the record rain in the Midwest (Ontario, too, I would add) is a consequence of climate change.
  • D-Brief notes that the failure of people around the world to eat enough fruits and vegetables may be responsible for millions of premature dead.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to gender-bending Italian music superstar Renato Zero.
  • Dead Things notes how genetic examinations have revealed the antiquity of many grapevines still used for wine.
  • Gizmodo notes that the ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa may contain simple salt.
  • io9 tries to determine the nature of the many twisted timelines of the X-Men movie universe of Fox.
  • JSTOR Daily observes that the Stonewall Riots were hardly the beginning of the gay rights movement in the US.
  • Language Log looks at the mixed scripts on a bookstore sign in Beijing.
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money argues that Jeremy Corbyn has a very strong hold on his loyal followers, perhaps even to the point of irrationality.
  • Marginal Revolution observes that people who create public genetic profiles for themselves also undo privacy for their entire biological family.
  • Sean Marshall at Marshall’s Musings shares a photo of a very high-numbered street address, 986039 Oxford-Perth Road in Punkeydoodle’s Corners.
  • The NYR Daily examines the origins of the wealth of Lehman Brothers in the exploitation of slavery.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a panorama-style photo of the Apollo 11 Little West Crater on the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that classic documentary Paris Is Burning has gotten a makeover and is now playing at TIFF.
  • Peter Rukavina, writing from a trip to Halifax, notes the convenience of the Eduroam procedures allowing users of one Maritime university computer network to log onto another member university’s network.
  • Dylan Reid at Spacing considers how municipal self-government might be best embedded in the constitution of Canada.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle pays tribute to the wildflower Speedwell, a name he remembers from Watership Down.
  • Strange Maps shares a crowdsourced map depicting which areas of Europe are best (and worst) for hitchhikers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the distribution of native speakers of Russian, with Israel emerging as more Russophone than some post-Soviet states.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul profiles the construction of the Modern Berlin Temple built to a design by Mies van der Rohe in 1968.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the beauty of galaxy M61.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that Mars sustained rivers on its surface at a surprising late date.
  • Gizmodo notes a theory that the oddly shaped ring moons of Saturn might be product of a collision.
  • Hornet Stories suggests/u> that recent raids on gay bars in New Orleans might be driven by internecine politics within the LGBTQ community.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a court in the Cayman Islands has recently legalized same-sex marriage there.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the origins of the Chipko activists of 1960s and 1970s India, whose tree-hugging helped save forests there.
  • Language Log notes the story of Beau Jessep, who got rich off of a business creating English names for Chinese children.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money, looking at the introduction of public healthcare in Saskatchewan and wider Canada, notes the great institutional differences that do not make that a close model for public healthcare in the US now.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining the close relationship over time between population growth and economic and technological change.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews documentary filmmaker Nadir Bouhmouch about a Amazigh community’s resistance to an intrusive mine on their territory.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes, correctly, that one reason why Ukrainians are more prone to emigration to Europe and points beyond than Russians is that Ukraine has long been included, in whole or in part, in European states.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we still do not know why antimatter does not dominate in our universe.
  • Understanding Society features a guest post from Indian sociologist V.K. Ramachandran talking about two visits four decades apart to one of his subjects.
  • Vintage Space makes a compelling case for people not to be afraid of nuclear rockets in space, like the vintage never-deployed NERVA.
  • Window on Eurasia takes issue with the bilingual radio programs aired in Russian republics, which subtly undermine local non-Russian languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts with lilacs, which include hybrids tolerant of the California climate, and goes on to explore lavender in all of its glories, queer and otherwise.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers what would be needed, and what would be the use, of a SETI search of Earth’s co-orbitals.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber considers the idea of nature potentially having legal rights in the context of corporations, likewise, actually having such.
  • D-Brief reports that the Mars 2020 probe will bring with it a mini-probe built around a helicopter.
  • io9 notes that writer Jonathan Hickman will be coming back to Marvel to write two new X-Men books this summer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a Trump supporter recently arrested for a Mafia slaying had earlier tried to conduct citizen’s arrests of prominent Democrats.
  • Language Hat takes a look at obscenities in Russian that do not quite make it over to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reacts to the massive anti-Brexit protests in the United Kingdom this past weekend.
  • Marginal Revolution discusses just how bad a Brexit is likely to be, or not.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why LIGO and like instruments have not detected gravitational wave sources within our galaxy. (Briefly, they aren’t good enough yet to pick up faint sources.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that not much new has come from the release of the Mueller investigation summary.
  • Arnold Zwicky builds from a report of a new LGBTQ consumer advocate from Florida, Nik Harris.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes new evidence that the Pathfinder probe landed, on Mars, on the shores of an ancient sea.
  • The Crux reports on tholins, the organic chemicals that are possible predecessors to life, now found in abundance throughout the outer Solar System.
  • D-Brief reports on the hard work that has demonstrated some meteorites which recently fell in Turkey trace their origins to Vesta.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog explores sociologist Eric Klinenberg’s concept of social infrastructure, the public spaces we use.
  • Far Outliers reports on a Honolulu bus announcement in Yapese, a Micronesian language spoken by immigrants in Hawai’i.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the import of the autobiography of Catherine the Great.
  • Language Hat reports, with skepticism, on the idea of “f” and “v” as sounds being products of the post-Neolithic technological revolution.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen is critical of the idea of limiting the number of children one has in a time of climate change.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reflects on death, close at hand and in New Zealand.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious disappearance, somewhere in Anatolia, of American cyclist Frank Lenz in 1892, and its wider consequences.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel identifies five types of cosmic events capable of triggering mass extinctions on Earth.
  • Towleroad reports on the frustration of many J.K. Rowling fans with the author’s continuing identification of queer histories for characters that are never made explicit in books or movies.
  • Window on Eurasia has a skeptical report about a Russian government plan to recruit Russophones in neighbouring countries as immigrants.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores themes of shipwrecks and of being shipwrecked.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at planetary nebulas, beautiful byproducts of the ends of stars.
  • Centauri Dreams shares an essay by Mark Millis looking at how NASA evaluates proposed new propulsion methods.
  • Bruce Dorminey takes a look at some interesting facts about the development of the Boeing 747.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing considers the ways in which deepfakes, allowing for alternate personalities online, evoke the Bunburying of Oscar Wilde.
  • Gizmodo notes that neutron star collisions might well reveal mysterious quark matter, if only they occurred within sight of us.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the sensuous nature of the Jane Austen novel Persuasion.
  • Language Log considers a potential case for Sinitic origins in the Balto-Slavic word for “iron”.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the weakness of the centre as a major pull for American voters.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper concluding that Chinese workers are not being exploited by the manufacturing companies that may employ them.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how the curvature of space-time under gravity can be measured.
  • Window on Eurasia considers two Kazakhstan observers who argue the country should switch from Kazakh-Russian bilingualism to Kazakh-English bilingualism.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers, after the Gay & Lesbian Review, the representation of different communities in the LGBT+ acronym, the utility of simple symbols, like “&” or “+”.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a lovely photo of the Earth peeking out from behind the far side of the Moon.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly shares lovely photos of delicate ice and water taken on a winter’s walk.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the study by Chinese astronomers who, looking at the distribution of Cepheids, figured out that our galaxy’s disk is an S-shaped warp.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that melting of the Greenland ice sheet will disrupt the Gulf Stream.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing takes issue with the uncritical idealization of the present, as opposed to the critical examination of whatever time period we are engaging with.
  • Gizmodo notes that an intensive series of brain scans is coming closer to highlighting the areas of the human brain responsible for consciousness.
  • Mark Graham links to new work of his, done in collaboration, looking at ways to make the sharing economy work more fairly in low- and middle-income countries.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the mystic Catholicism of the African kingdom of Kongo may have gone on to inspire slave-led revolutions in 18th century North America and Haiti.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at an exhibition examining the ambitious architecture of Yugoslavia.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a cartographer’s argument about the continuing importance of paper maps.
  • Marginal Revolution shares one commenter’s perception of causes or the real estate boom in New Zealand.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the role of the mysterious silent neurons in the human brain.
  • At NYR Daily, Guadeloupe writer Maryse Condé talks about her career as a writer and the challenges of identity for her native island.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of ten dishes reflecting the history of the city of Lisbon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel takes a look at the promise of likely mini-Neptune Barnard’s Star b as a target for observation, perhaps even life.
  • Window on Eurasia shares the perfectly plausible argument that, just as the shift of the Irish to the English language did not end Irish identity and nationalism, so might a shift to Russian among Tatars not end Tatar identity.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • D-Brief suggests that, in an era of climate change, waves of simultaneous wildfires may be the new normal in California.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some news items looking at the history of the Precambrian Earth and of ancient life.
  • The Island Review shares some Greenland-themed poems by Elżbieta Wójcik-Leese.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the introduced Callery pear tree has become invasive in North America.
  • Language Log considers language as a self-regulating system.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes his new magpie friend. What name should he have?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the democracy of Mexico is in such poor shape that, even now, the democracies of Poland and Hungary despite far-right subversion are better off.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the 1993 novel The Night of the Moonbow by Thomas Tryon.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the falling fertility rates in Syria, and takes issue with one statistical claim.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that gravitational waves are affected by gravity, and looks at what this implies for physics.
  • Towleroad reports that Sarah Silverman has rethought her use of the word “gay” in her comedy routines.
  • Vintage Space notes the evidence confirming that many–most, even–Apollo astronauts had tattoos.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the boundaries of the “Russian world” continue to contract, with the status of the Russian language receding in the education and the media and the public life of neighbouring countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers which part of Europe Switzerland lies in. Is it central European, or western European?