A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘science

[NEWS] Four science links, from water on the frontier to climate change to Tau Ceti exoplanets

leave a comment »

  • At Wired, Matt Simon explores the remarkably wrong-headed theory of the 19th century US that “rain follows the plough.”
  • These National Geographic photos of the unexplored lakes in Angola that feed the Okavango are remarkable.
  • Rachel Brown examines billy burr, the Colorado hermit whose collection of decades of climate data is invaluable.
  • Universe Today notes a new study confirming the existence of Tau Ceti e and f, potentially habitable rocky exoplanets just 12 light years away.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 9, 2017 at 10:59 pm

[NEWS] Five science links: Uganda coffee, the cetenophore, the Rapanui, Proxima b, Przybylski’s star

leave a comment »

  • National Geographic reports on how, unchecked, global warming may wreck the coffee industry of Uganda.
  • Aeon notes the nervous system of the ctenophore, product of a separate evolutionary process from our own.
  • Phys.org describes a recent study suggesting Easter Island was not wrecked by ecocide. (The Rapanui were devastated by others, I would add.)
  • Even with an active magnetic field, an Earth-like atmosphere of Proxima Centauri b might be eroded away by flares. Universe Today reports on the climate model making this prediction.
  • Does bizarre Przybylski’s star, HD 101065, contain exotic superheavy elements in its atmosphere? New Scientist wonders.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

leave a comment »

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly re-introduces herself to her readers.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares one man’s theory about how extraterrestrials could use exoplanet sightings to build up a galactic communications network.
  • Far Outliers shares some unusual Japanese words, starting with “amepotu” for American potato.
  • Language Hat takes</a. note of an effort to preserve the Kiowa language.
  • Did the spokeswoman of the NRA threaten to “fisk” the New York Times or threaten something else? Language Log reports.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that, compared to San Francisco, Toronto does not have much of a public kink scene.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the quantum reasons behind the explosion produced by sodium metal and water.
  • Understanding Society takes rightful issue with The Guardian’s shoddy coverage of Dearborn, Michigan, and that city’s Muslims and/or Arabs.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Canada is, at last, starting to take in queer refugees from Chechnya.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the embarrassing support for Jean-Luc Mélenchon for Venezuela. Was opposing the US all he wanted?

[NEWS] Four links on Canada, from economics to language to poverty to greenhouses

leave a comment »

  • Bloomberg reports on how Canada-Mexico relations will be tested by NAFTA and Trump.
  • Canada, the 2016 Census reported, is marked by noteworthy linguistic diversity (Tagalog does particularly well.)
  • Vice notes how Galen Weston’s opposition to the minimum wage increase for workers at Loblaws is not in his self-interest.
  • Vice’s Motherboard looks at how greenhouse agriculture in Nunavut could help drastically reduce food insecurity in that territory.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

leave a comment »

  • The Citizen Science Blog notes an effort to undertake a census of the monarch butterfly this week.
  • Crooked Timber’s Eric Rauchway riffs on Nolan’s Dunkirk as a meditation on the end of empire.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that, though a good idea science-wise, interstellar probes are not coming anytime soon.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog shares 13 lessons to be taken from 13 Reasons Why.
  • Language Hat investigates the deeper etymology of “Lozi”, a people of Zambia.
  • Victor Mair of Language Log takes a critical look at the difficulty of learning Chinese characters.
  • Turning to the taxi industry, Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the extent to which the gig economy undermines immigrant and minority participation in established industries.
  • The LRB Blog wonders what Brexiteers could possibly have, rightly, against the European Court of Justice. Law matters …
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is disconcerted by the extent to which some people believe falsehoods about crime and race in the US.
  • Transit Toronto notes last night’s Underground Freedom Train Ride. I’m sad I missed this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Belarus’ concern over the import of upcoming joint military exercises with Russia, here and here.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • Charley Ross reports on an unexpected personal involvement in the disappearance of Kori Gossett. Did an informant know?
  • Citizen Science Salon reports, in the time of #sharkweek, on the sevengill sharks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article on the Chinese base in Sudan.
  • Inkfish has a fascinating article describing how New Zealand’s giant black swans went extinct, and were replaced.
  • Language Hat notes two obscure words of Senegalese French, “laptot” and “signare”. What do they mean? Go see.
  • Language Log argues that the influx of English loanwords in Chinese is remarkable. Does it signal future changes in language?
  • Lawyers, Guns Money notes how Los Angeles and southern California were, during the American Civil War, a stronghold of secessionist sentiment, and runs down some of the problems of Mexico, including the militarization of crime.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on what books by which authors tend to get stolen from British bookstores.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that Donald Trump is not likely to be able to substantially reshape NAFTA.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the recent protests in Poland against changes to the Supreme Court.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the structure of the cities of medieval Europe, which apparently were dynamic and flexible.
  • Unicorn Booty shares some classic gay board games.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is going to try to wage a repeat of the Winter War on Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes a look at how surfing has been commodified.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the stellar occultation that has revealed information about MU69, the next New Horizons target.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin takes issue with Mélenchon’s take on anti-Semitism and the French role in the Holocaust.
  • D-Brief notes that we really are not good at detecting faked photos.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage photos of strippers from the 1960s.
  • Michael Sacasas of The Frailest Things looks, again, at the technologically enchanted world.
  • Language Log takes issue with the dismissive treatment of “… in a woodpile.” The expression is poison.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the dual position of the camel among the Sahrawi, as wild and tame at once.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the problems of neuroscience, statistically.
  • The NYR Daily considers the hacking of the American vote. Who did it? Who gained?
  • Science Sushi notes that climate change threats African wild dogs’ survival.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Armenian argument that Russia lacks the soft power that the Soviet Union once enjoyed.