A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘science

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • Citizen Science Salon links to some ongoing crowdsourced experiments that non-scientists can take part in.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the return of Newt Gingrich to the American political scene.
  • The NYR Daily compares Donald Trump to a 19th century counterpart, Andrew Jackson.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the now rather different cocaine problem of MedellĂ­n, Colombia.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on a paper suggesting potential problems with gravitational observatory LIGO.
  • Towleroad notes a recent sharp drop in new HIV diagnoses in the United Kingdom, thanks to treatment and PrEP.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on projected long-run economic decline in Russia, argues about the potential for instability in Tatarstan, and reports on Belarusianization.
  • Arnold Zwicky describes Silver Age Rainbow Batman and his later pride appearances.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

leave a comment »

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly photoblogs about her trip to Berlin.
  • Dead Things reports on a recent study that unraveled the evolutionary history of the domestic cat.
  • James Nicoll notes that his niece and nephew will each be performing theatre in Toronto.
  • Language Hat has an interesting link to interviews of coders as if they were translators.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at Chinese video game competitions and Chinese tours to Soviet revolutionary sites.
  • Steve Munro shares photos of the old Kitchener trolleybus.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of the Ramadan drummer of Coney Island.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay arguing that photographed subjects should provide they consent and receive renumeration.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Trans March.
  • Towleroad notes the cancellation of anti-gay convictions of Nazis.
  • Van Waffle shows the stories of the caterpillars in his backyard.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts an essay talking about the difficulties of translating the Book of Genesis.

[NEWS] Five links about science, from libraries to smartphone sociology to spaceflight

leave a comment »

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • D-Brief notes the first-ever use of Einsteinian gravitational bending to examine the mass of a star.
  • Language Log announces the start of an investigation into the evolving rhetoric of Donald Trump. Something is up.
  • The LRB Blog reports from Tuareg Agadez in Niger, about rebellions and migrant-smuggling.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders what is the rationale for the extreme cut-off imposed on Qatar.
  • Maximos62 wonders about the impact of Indonesia’s fires on not just wildlife but indigenous peoples.
  • Personal Reflections notes the irrelevance of the United States’ withdrawal from Paris, at least from an Australian position.
  • Savage Minds points to a new anthropology podcast.
  • Window on Eurasia notes anti-immigrant sentiment in Moscow and reports on the use of Russia’s anti-extremism laws against Protestants.

[NEWS] Ten links, from human evolution through cultural diversity to the Toronto Islands

leave a comment »

  • The Atlantic‘s Ed Yong notes the discovery of dated Homo sapiens fossils 300k years old in Morocco. (!)
  • The Atlantic reports on Twitter-driven science that has highlighted the remarkable visual acuity of the spider.
  • The Economist notes that multilingual societies can encounter more difficulties prospering than unilingual ones.
  • Torontoist notes a Thunder Bay park devoted to the idea of First Nations reconciliation.
  • The Inter Press Service reports on how gardens grown under solar tents in Bolivia can improve nutrition in poor highland villages.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Christopher Hume trolls Rob Ford’s supporters over the new, well-designed, Etobicoke Civic Centre.
  • Metro Toronto calculates just how many avocado toasts would go into a mortgage in the GTA.
  • MacLean’s hosts a collection of twenty photos from gritty Niagara Falls, New York.
  • The National Post shows remarkable, heartbreaking photos from the flooded Toronto Islands.
  • Edward Keenan argues that the Toronto Islands’ flooding should help prompt a local discussion on climate change.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • Crooked Timber responds to The Intercept’s release of data regarding Russian interference with American elections.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on how Melanie Gaydos overcame a rare genetic disorder to become a model.
  • Dead Things seems unduly happy that it does seem as if Tyrannosaurus rex had feathers. (I like the idea.)
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on our ability to detect the effects of a planet-shattering Nicoll-Dyson beam.
  • The Frailest Thing considers being a parent in the digital age.
  • Language Hat notes the African writing systems of nsibidi and bamum.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Trump-supporting states are moving to green energy quite quickly.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russian guarantees of traditional rights to the peoples of the Russian North do not take their current identities into account.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at evidence that Ceres’ Occator Crater, an apparent cryovolcano, may have been recently active.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin wonders what would have happened had Kerensky accepted the German Reichstag’s proposal in 1917.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some fun that employees at a bookstore in France got up to with book covers.
  • Cody Delistraty describes F. Scott Fitzgerald’s utter failure to fit into Hollywood.
  • A Fistful of Euros hosts Alex Harrowell’s blog post taking a look at recent history from a perspective of rising populism.
  • io9 reports on a proposal from the Chinese city of Lanzhou to set up a water pipeline connecting it to Siberia’s Lake Baikal.
  • Imageo notes a recent expedition by Norwegian scientists aiming at examining the winter ice.
  • Strange Maps links to an amazing graphic mapping the lexical distances between Europe’s languages.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is on the verge of a new era of population decline, and shares a perhaps alarming perspective on the growth of Muslim populations in Russia.