A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘science

[BLOG] Some science links

leave a comment »

  • blogTO looks back on a Toronto heat wave in 1935.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the K2-72 and Kepler-80 systems.
  • D-Brief reports on early signs of global warming in Siberia and looks at how African honeyguide birds work together with human hunters.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the search for habitable planets around red dwarfs, looks at the habitability of planets with eccentric orbits, and notes that warm Jupiters can co-exist with smaller planets nearby.
  • The Dragon’s Tales look at a proposed Europa mission, and notes an astrobiological model of Titan’s atmosphere.
  • Imageo shares Juno’s first view of Jupiter.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports about the Planetary Society’s presence at San Diego Comic-Con.

[NEWS] Some Thursday links

  • Bloomberg notes concern in Northern Ireland’s border towns over Brexit, reports that Morgan may shift its offices from London to Dublin or Frankfurt, and looks at the hostile reaction Donald Trump is likely to receive in Scotland.
  • Bloomberg View looks at the vexed issues of American funding for Israel’s defense industry.
  • The CBC notes the discovery of a transmissible cancer affecting shellfish.
  • MacLean’s takes a sanguine view of millennials in Canada who stay with their parents.
  • The National Post interviews a Muslim woman attacked in London, Ontario, and notes odd institutional issues raised against the Pride parade in Steinbach.
  • The New Republic looks at the impact the collapse of Barnes & Noble would have on American publishing and literature.
  • Open Democracy fears the effect of Brexit on central and eastern Europe.
  • Transitions Online notes the lack of reciprocation for Bulgarian Russophilia.
  • Wired notes that the Brexit referendum is a major inflection point in the European Union’s history.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO notes the spotting of a High Park capybara.
  • Centauri Dreams reflects on the Pluto landscape.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at percolation theory in connection to the Fermi paradox.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the homophobic and useless reactions of one anti-gay group to HIV.

  • Language Hat links to an essay linking language with emotion.
  • The NYRB Daily points to a 13th century anti-Semitic caricature.
  • Towleroad examines George Michael as a gay icon.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy talks from a libertarian perspective about the negative consequences of a Trump administration for freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Ukraine should exit the Minsk process as harmful to its interests.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • Bloomberg notes concern in Asia regarding Brexit, and reports on a Taiwanese call to China to heal from Tiananmen.
  • CBC notes a shocking proposal to assemble a human being using an artificial genome.
  • io9 notes the interest of the Chinese government in setting up a local science fiction award.
  • MacLean’s notes Russian crime gangs are blackmailing gay men.
  • The National Post observes one suggestion that Stonehenge was originally Welsh, and reports on a Wildrose parliamentarian in Alberta who compared a carbon tax to the Ukrainian genocide.
  • Open Democracy examines English identity in the context of Brexit and reports on South America’s Operation Condor.
  • The Toronto Star reports on an African grey parrot that may be a murder witness and notes Trudeau’s statement that preserving indigenous languages is key to preventing youth suicides.

[NEWS] Some Thursday links

  • The BBC notes a study suggesting that the bombardment of the early Moon by comets gave it water.
  • Bloomberg View criticizes red tape in Greece, and notes that the salts of Australia will be drawing solar cell manufacturers to that country.
  • The Guardian notes Jeremy Corbyn’s claims of BBC bias against him.
  • The Inter Press Service examines the vulnerability of young women in Africa to HIV.
  • MacLean’s notes the struggles of a prominent Inuit family, the Tootoos, with alcohol.
  • National Geographic notes an exciting archeological dig into the heart of Roman London and reports on signs of activity on Pluto.
  • New Scientist notes that, among the orcas, evolution is driven by culture, with culturally distinctive groups also being genetically distinctive.
  • The Toronto Star reports that Mossack-Fonseca, the law firm at the heart of the Panama Papers, is shuttering offices.
  • Wired notes Switzerland’s Gotthard tunnel and warns that Flint is not the worst bit of American infrastructure in decay.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes the warning of the Royal Bank of Canada that the city has too many condos.
  • D-Brief notes how patterns of glucose consumption in the brain can distinguish between people capable of consciousness and those otherwise.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the Victorian tradition of post-mortem photographs.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that, apparently, our knowledge of nearby brown dwarfs is limited.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the impact of close encounters with massive passing bodies on the crusts of ice moons.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the criticism of Peter Thiel, funder of attacks against Gawker, by Gawker’s founder as a comic book villain.
  • Language Log notes early efforts to promote a single standard for the Russian language in the Soviet era.
  • The Map Room Blog shares the new map of the London subway system.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog charts the sources of different countries’ immigrant populations.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the popularity of imperialism in Russia.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • Business Insider looks at the sad state of a project to build a Chinese bullet train in Venezuela.
  • Bloomberg notes the profound unconstitutionality of Donald Trump’s suggestion that the US national debt might be renounced, looks at the needs of the Brazilian economy, and suggests Poland’s economic nationalism is viable.
  • CBC reports that Sinéad O’Connor is safe in Chicago.
  • National Geographic shares hidden pictures of the Cultural Revolution.
  • The National Post notes the discovery of what might be the ruins of an old fort at Lunenburg.
  • Open Democracy suggests that Brexit, by separating the City of London from the European Union, could trigger the end of globalization, also taking a look at the popularity of populism.
  • Reuters notes the softening of the terms of a Chinese-Venezuelan loan arrangement.
  • The Washington Post notes the migration of some Ethiopian-Americans to a booming Ethiopia.
  • Wired looks at how natural gas will be used to move beyond the Haber-Bosch process which has created fertilizer for a century.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 544 other followers