A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘science

[NEWS] Seven science and tech links: GW170814, birds and dinosaurs, asteroid belts, oceans, energy

leave a comment »

  • GW170814, detected by VIRGO and LIGO, marks the collision of two black holes, 31 and 25 solar masses, 1.8 billion light-years away. Ars Technica reports.
  • The American Museum of Natural History in New York has a new exhibition linking birds and dinosaurs. National Geographic notes.
  • This new asteroid belt model suggesting it began empty, then filled from the inner and outer system, is interesting. Universe Today goes into more detail.
  • New studies are suggesting that the oceans are starting to warm up. The Guardian reports.
  • Offshore wind farms are apparently serving as platforms for flourishing marine ecologies, starting with mussels. Technology Review examines preliminary findings here.
  • Hydroelectric development in the highlands of Georgia is disrupting already fragile human communities there. Open Democracy reports.
  • Australian scientists may have found the genes causing the small wings of emus. Could they get bigger wings now? The Herald-Sun describes the finding and its import.
Advertisements

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross bets that barring catastrophe, the US under Trump will dispatch crewed circumlunar flights.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the evolution of birds, through speculation on how the beak formed.
  • Language Log looks at the ways Trump is represented, and mocked, in the languages of East Asia.
  • Noting the death toll in a Mexico City sweatshop, Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that sweatshops are dangerous places to work.
  • The NYR Daily notes the many structural issues likely to prevent foreign-imposed fixes in Afghanistan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from a seemingly unlikely date festival held in the depths of the Saudi desert.
  • Rocky Planet reports that Mount Agung, a volcano in Indonesia, is at risk of imminent eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a new stage adaptation in Toronto of the Hitchcock classic, North by Northwest.
  • Strange Company reports on how the Lonergans disappeared in 1998 in a dive off the Great Barrier Reef. What happened to them?
  • Towleroad notes how Chelsea Manning was just banned from entering Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia claims that the Russian language is disappearing from Armenia.
  • Arnold Zwicky maps the usage of “faggot” as an obscenity in the United States.

[NEWS] Four science links: Neanderthals, oceans and computers, Brazil rainforest, water on Vesta

leave a comment »

  • Neanderthals, like contemporary humans, had the sort of prolonged childhoods which lend themselves to intelligence. National Geographic reports.
  • The cool chill water of oceans is starting to be used to cool data centres. VICE reports.
  • Brazil is set to embark on a substantial process to restore Amazonian rainforest. VICE reports.
  • The Dawn probe found evidence of subsurface ice on rocky asteroid-belt protoplanet Vesta. Universe Today reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.

[NEWS] Five science and technology links: Darjeeling tea, Fitbits, cannabis, PrEP, Planet Nine

leave a comment »

  • Climate change is making the famous tea of Darjeeling much more difficult to come by. VICE reports.
  • Wired notes Fitbits are useful tracking devices for scientists engaged in studies, too. (I always wear mine.)
  • I entirely approve of this new Niagara College program. Why not legalize and professionalize cannabis agriculture?
  • This VICE interview with bringing the Truvada needed for inexpensive PrEP across the border into Canada is of note.
  • A new study suggests that Planet Nine, if it exists, was likely not captured by the young sun but formed here. Universe Today reports.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.
  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of “The Ballad of the Green Berets”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the science behind Cassini.
  • Crooked Timber’s Henry Farrell is breaking from Harvard’s Kennedy Centre over its revocation of an invitation to Chelsea Manning.
  • The Crux points to the ways in which the legacy of Cassini will still be active.
  • D-Brief notes that some tool-using macaques of Thailand are overfishing their environment.
  • Hornet Stories notes the eulogy given by Hillary Clinton at the funeral of Edie Windsor.
  • Inkfish notes one way to define separate bird species: ask the birds what they think. (Literally.)
  • The LRB Blog notes the recent passing of Margot Hielscher, veteran German star and one-time crush of Goebbels.
  • The NYR Daily notes the chilling effects on discourse in India of a string of murders of Indian journalists and writers.
  • At the Planetary Science Blog, Emily Lakdawalla bids farewell to the noble Cassini probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a breakfast in Bangladesh complicated by child marriage.
  • Towleroad notes an Australian church cancelled an opposite-sex couple’s wedding because the bride supports equality.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the marmots of, among other places, cosmopolitan and multilingual Swiss canton of Graub√ľnden.