A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘science

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO notes the spotting of a High Park capybara.
  • Centauri Dreams reflects on the Pluto landscape.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at percolation theory in connection to the Fermi paradox.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the homophobic and useless reactions of one anti-gay group to HIV.

  • Language Hat links to an essay linking language with emotion.
  • The NYRB Daily points to a 13th century anti-Semitic caricature.
  • Towleroad examines George Michael as a gay icon.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy talks from a libertarian perspective about the negative consequences of a Trump administration for freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Ukraine should exit the Minsk process as harmful to its interests.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • Bloomberg notes concern in Asia regarding Brexit, and reports on a Taiwanese call to China to heal from Tiananmen.
  • CBC notes a shocking proposal to assemble a human being using an artificial genome.
  • io9 notes the interest of the Chinese government in setting up a local science fiction award.
  • MacLean’s notes Russian crime gangs are blackmailing gay men.
  • The National Post observes one suggestion that Stonehenge was originally Welsh, and reports on a Wildrose parliamentarian in Alberta who compared a carbon tax to the Ukrainian genocide.
  • Open Democracy examines English identity in the context of Brexit and reports on South America’s Operation Condor.
  • The Toronto Star reports on an African grey parrot that may be a murder witness and notes Trudeau’s statement that preserving indigenous languages is key to preventing youth suicides.

[NEWS] Some Thursday links

  • The BBC notes a study suggesting that the bombardment of the early Moon by comets gave it water.
  • Bloomberg View criticizes red tape in Greece, and notes that the salts of Australia will be drawing solar cell manufacturers to that country.
  • The Guardian notes Jeremy Corbyn’s claims of BBC bias against him.
  • The Inter Press Service examines the vulnerability of young women in Africa to HIV.
  • MacLean’s notes the struggles of a prominent Inuit family, the Tootoos, with alcohol.
  • National Geographic notes an exciting archeological dig into the heart of Roman London and reports on signs of activity on Pluto.
  • New Scientist notes that, among the orcas, evolution is driven by culture, with culturally distinctive groups also being genetically distinctive.
  • The Toronto Star reports that Mossack-Fonseca, the law firm at the heart of the Panama Papers, is shuttering offices.
  • Wired notes Switzerland’s Gotthard tunnel and warns that Flint is not the worst bit of American infrastructure in decay.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes the warning of the Royal Bank of Canada that the city has too many condos.
  • D-Brief notes how patterns of glucose consumption in the brain can distinguish between people capable of consciousness and those otherwise.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the Victorian tradition of post-mortem photographs.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that, apparently, our knowledge of nearby brown dwarfs is limited.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the impact of close encounters with massive passing bodies on the crusts of ice moons.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the criticism of Peter Thiel, funder of attacks against Gawker, by Gawker’s founder as a comic book villain.
  • Language Log notes early efforts to promote a single standard for the Russian language in the Soviet era.
  • The Map Room Blog shares the new map of the London subway system.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog charts the sources of different countries’ immigrant populations.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the popularity of imperialism in Russia.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • Business Insider looks at the sad state of a project to build a Chinese bullet train in Venezuela.
  • Bloomberg notes the profound unconstitutionality of Donald Trump’s suggestion that the US national debt might be renounced, looks at the needs of the Brazilian economy, and suggests Poland’s economic nationalism is viable.
  • CBC reports that Sinéad O’Connor is safe in Chicago.
  • National Geographic shares hidden pictures of the Cultural Revolution.
  • The National Post notes the discovery of what might be the ruins of an old fort at Lunenburg.
  • Open Democracy suggests that Brexit, by separating the City of London from the European Union, could trigger the end of globalization, also taking a look at the popularity of populism.
  • Reuters notes the softening of the terms of a Chinese-Venezuelan loan arrangement.
  • The Washington Post notes the migration of some Ethiopian-Americans to a booming Ethiopia.
  • Wired looks at how natural gas will be used to move beyond the Haber-Bosch process which has created fertilizer for a century.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • Bloomberg notes Canadian-born Bank of England governor Mark Carney’s criticism of Brexit, looks at the continuing exodus of Somalis from their homeland, and looks at an unusual crisis with the creditors of Turkey’s central bank.
  • CBC looks at the human cost of the one-child policy in China, reports on Maxine Bernier’s decision to run for the Conservative Party leadership, notes that many cell phones have their FM radio chips turned off, and looks at the undue criticism of Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau for wanting help.
  • The Globe and Mail notes the lack of interest among Canadians in radically changing Canadian content rules.
  • MacLean’s looks at Québec’s careful policy on the sharing economy and shares Kathryn Borel’s interview with Anne Kingston.
  • National Geographic writes about the intelligence of birds.
  • The National Post notes a Washington State mall’s decision to accept Canadian dollars on par on holiday weekends.
  • Universe Today reports on a Japanese 3-D map of galaxies stretching billions of light years that confirms Einstein’s theory of relativity.
  • The Verge notes the compelling postmodernist fictions written by Google’s AI.
  • Wired reports about the genesis of Eurekalert.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about intermittent fasting as a weight loss method.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the Ukrainian victory in Eurovision.
  • Language Hat notes one Persian monarch’s problems with getting good translators.
  • Language Log looks at Singlish, the Singaporean variant of English.
  • Marginal Revolution compares tax fraud in Sweden and Italy.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on interesting brain scans conducted of someone having a mystic religious experience.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one brutal economic prediction for Russia, projecting sustained decline with only major cities resisting.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at homoerotic photos of men dressed as unicorns.