A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘science

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers, in the context of ‘Oumuamua, the import of shads and axis ratios. What does it suggest about the processes by which planetary systems form?
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a report suggesting that Russia is not at all likely to legalize bitcoins.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at Article 63, the German constitutional article that governs the selection of the Chancellor.
  • The Frailest Thing quotes a passage from Jacques Ellul about the adaptation of humans to a mechanized world.
  • Hornet Stories notes that out actor Russell Tovey is set to play the (also out) Ray in the Arrowverse, an anti-Nazi superhero from an alternate Earth.
  • Language Hat tells the story of Lin Shu, an early 20th century translator of European fiction into Chinese whose works were remarkably influential.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is amused by the story of a young university student who has used basic knowledge of Foucault to play with his family’s household rules.
  • The LRB Blog notes the very awkward, and potentially fatal, position of the Rohingya, caught between Burma and Bangladesh.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a talk recently given on fake maps, on maps used to lie and misrepresent and propagandize.
  • The NYR Daily meditates on the precocity and the homoeroticism inherent in the Hart Crane poem “The Bridge.”
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we can see, so far, only a surprisingly small fraction of the observable universe. (So far.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy celebrates the many defeats of Trump as he fights against sanctuary cities as a victory for federalism and against executive power.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a poll suggesting that, after 2014, while Crimeans may feel less Ukrainian they do not necessarily feel more Russian.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look, linguistically, at an Ian Frazier phrase: “That is aliens for you.”
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[NEWS] Four science links: neutrinos and Antarctica, ‘Oumuamua, Ceres and Pluto, panspermia

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  • This feature explaining how neutrino telescopes in Antarctica are being used to study the Earth’s core is fascinating. The Globe and Mail has it.
  • Universe Today shares “Project Lyra”, a proposal for an unmanned probe to interstellar asteroid ‘Oumuamua.
  • Dwarf planets Ceres and Pluto, Nora Redd suggests at Discover, may have much more in common than we might think. Is Ceres a KBO transported into the warm asteroid belt?
  • Universe Today reports on one paper that takes a look at some mechanisms behind galactic panspermia.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 24, 2017 at 4:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • James Bow shares a deeply personal memory about a streetcar stop by Queens Quay where his life was recently transformed.
  • D-Brief notes that antimatter is one byproduct of lightning. (Really.)
  • Daily JSTOR counsels against buying into the scam of “authenticity.”
  • Language Hat shares a 2005 essay by Patricia Palmer, talking about how the spread of English was intimately linked with imperialism, first in Ireland then overseas.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money is strongly against Black Friday.
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump’s hardline policies are not going to help bring about change in Cuba.
  • Out There talks about how we are able to be pretty sure that interstellar asteorid ‘Oumuamua is not an extraterrestrial artifact.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to imagine, economically, what an American Ontario would be like.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about some good local beer enjoyed in Chiapas.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares a list of ten scientific phenomena we should be thankful for, if we want to exist.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his Christmas bell flowering maple.

[NEWS] Five links on science, culture: blue whales, Hedy Lamarr, telecom, infrastructure, misogyny

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  • Apparently 80% of blue whales are left-handed. National Geographic reports.
  • The FCC has just stopped support for a program that subsidizes vital telecommunications for, among other groups, Native Americans. VICE reports.
  • Between political challenges and problems with construction, major infrastructure projects are failing to meet their goals at a noteworthy rate. National Geographic reports.
  • VICE recounts the story of Hedy Lamarr, noteworthy actor and brilliant scientist, from the perspective of a documentary noting how misogyny kept her from employing her talents to the fullest.
  • This Claire Dederer article in The Paris Review, talking about the works of monstrous men can (or should?) be salvaged from the legacies of their creators, is tremendously important.

[NEWS] Five assorted links: turkey, Mojave phone booth, LGBT apology, Anne Murray, Morrissey

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  • National Geographic takes a look at the natural history of the surprisingly stunning turkey, dispersed across North America and with an underrated beauty.
  • Urban Ghosts Media tells the strange story of a working phone booth stranded in the Mojave Desert, and the tissue of myths and culture that grew up around it.
  • CBC notes that Justin Trudeau is set to issue an official apology to the LGBTQ people purged from government service by past generations’ homophobia.
  • Anne Murray just made a massive donation of archival material from her long life and career to the University of Toronto’s library system. Respect.
  • Morrissey’s statements for sexual abusers and against multiculturalism and etnic minorities are almost more upsetting for the fact that they were so freely offered. However good the man’s music is, should we music fans still support it, and him?

[NEWS] Three notes about genetics and history and the future: Georgia, Beothuk, Amish

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  • Archeological work has revealed evidence of vineyards in the Republic of Georgia dating back eight thousand years. National Geographic reports.
  • This extended article looks at the ways in which modern genetics are revealing the ancient history of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, using the Beothuk as an example. The Guardian has it.
  • Joe O’Connor describes how an obscure mutation among the Amish governing blood clotting may offer guides for people interested in extending human longevity, over at the National Post.

[NEWS] Four links on Antarctica: ancient Godwanaland forests, mantle plume, American infrastructure

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  • Elaina Zachos reports on the discovery of a remarkable intact petrified forest in Antarctica more than a quarter-billion years old, legacy of ancient Godwanaland, over at National Geographic.
  • D-Brief reports on the remarkable adaptations of the forests of Godwanaland, now Antarctica, to six months without light.
  • Universe Today reports that a hitherto unsupected plume from the mantle underneath Antarctica may be partially responsible for the ready melting of that continent’s ice sheets.
  • Justin Gillis and Jonathan Corum report on how the infrastructure of the American presence in Antarctica, including McMurdo station, is in desperate need for investment to compensate for decades of neglect, over at the New York Times.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 18, 2017 at 10:30 pm