A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘Science

[CAT] Five #caturday links: Newfoundland, Australia, tracking, body language, bodies

  • The rescue of cats from the Newfoundland outport of Little Bay Islands, now abandoned, was a success. Global News reports.
  • Cats in Australia may be in a position to ravage vulnerable survivors of the wildfires. Wired reports.
  • The Purrsong Pendant is a new fitness tracker for cats. CNET reports.
  • Humans do need to be able to read the body language of cats, and not only to figure out when they are in pain. CP24 reports.
  • Is anyone surprised cats might eat human corpses? Newsweek reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 18, 2020 at 9:15 pm

[BLOG] Five Starts With A Bang links (@startswithabang)

  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the question of Betelgeuse going supernova, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how black holes might, or might not, spit matter back out, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes a report suggesting the local excess of positrons is product not of dark matter but of nearby pulsar Geminga, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel lists some of the most distant astronomical objects so far charted in our universe, here.
  • The question of whether or not a god did create the universe, Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang suggests, remains open.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 30, 2019 at 8:41 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that Betelgeuse is very likely not on the verge of a supernova, here.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the mapping of asteroid Bennu.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber reposted, after the election, a 2013 essay looking at the changes in British society from the 1970s on.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about the Precambrian Earth, here.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about fear in the context of natural disasters, here.
  • Far Outliers reports on the problems of privateers versus regular naval units.
  • Gizmodo looks at galaxy MAMBO-9, which formed a billion years after the Big Bang.
  • io9 writes about the alternate history space race show For All Mankind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the posters used in Ghana in the 1980s to help promote Hollywood movies.
  • Language Hat links to a new book that examines obscenity and gender in 1920s Britain.
  • Language Log looks at the terms used for the national language in Xinjiang.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with Jeff Jacoby’s lack of sympathy towards people who suffer from growing inequality.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that urbanists should have an appreciation for Robert Moses.
  • Sean Marshall writes, with photos, about his experiences riding a new Bolton bus.
  • Caryl Philips at the NYR Daily writes about Rachmanism, a term wrongly applied to the idea of avaricious landlords like Peter Rachman, an immigrant who was a victim of the Profumo scandal.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking at the experience of aging among people without families.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the empty space in an atom can never be removed.
  • Strange Maps shares a festive map of London, a reindeer, biked by a cyclist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Mongolia twice tried to become a Soviet republic.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers different birds with names starting with x.

[BLOG] Five Starts With A Bang links (@startswithabang)

  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how the images of galaxies grow with the universe, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how we can know the age of the universe, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains what an octonion is and what it might show about the universe, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains the surprise created by a detailed map of neutron star J0030+0451, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel suggests the mysterious near-supernova that Eta Carinae barely survived in the 19th century was actually a stellar collision, here.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 19, 2019 at 10:45 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Ten JSTOR Daily links (@jstor_daily)

  • JSTOR Daily considers whether koalas are actually going extinct, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the life and accomplishments of Alexander Von Humboldt, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how a move to California doomed the Oneida Community, here.
  • JSTOR Daily considers how the genetically diverse wild relatives of current crops could help our agriculture, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the devastating flood of Florence in 1966, here.
  • JSTOR Daily points out there is no template for emotional intelligence, here.
  • JSTOR Daily explores some remarkable lumpy pearls, here.
  • JSTOR Daily notes an 1870 scare over the future of men, here.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the staging of war scenes for the 1945 documentary The Battle of San Pietro, here.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the bioethics of growing human brains in a petri dish, here.

[CAT] Seven #caturday links: Lil Bub, Pallas cats, Smudge, adoptions, expressions

  • This Wired obituary for Lil Bub, arguing that the time for the Internet to be a place fo whimsy is over, does make me sad.
  • Norwegian forest cats look amazing! The Dockyards has photos.
  • The Pallas cats newly in the Calgary Zoo are, rightfully, becoming big hits. Cottage Life has more.
  • Ottawa cat Smudge, already a meme hit, has become a celebrity. CBC Ottawa has more.
  • Unsurprisingly, cats bond with their owners in the same sort of way as dogs and even human infants. More here.
  • Happily, record numbers of cats are being adopted from shelters, given new homes. Global News reports.
  • Some few people are apparently good are deciphering the expressions of cats, 15% of the total in one study sample. VICE reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 7, 2019 at 5:00 pm

[NEWS] Six cetacean links

  • Apparently upwards of 95% of dolphins are right-handed. Global News reports.
  • A dead sperm whale has been found in Scotland, choked on a hundred kilograms of plastic waste. CBC reports.
  • Tracking the heart rate of a blue whale is something that we can do. CBC reports.
  • Nearly a hundred cetaceans held in a Russian facility seem to be doing well after being released to their ocean home. CBC reports.
  • The policies of Elizabeth Warren could, if she was elected, impact the seafood industry of Atlantic Canada. (As, I think, they should.) CBC reports.
  • Whale populations can, if we treat them well, help save the climate from catastrophe. VICE makes the case.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 4, 2019 at 11:59 pm