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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘second world war

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthro{dendum} features an essay examining trauma and resiliency as encountered in ethnographic fieldwork.
  • Architectuul highlights a new project seeking to promote historic churches built in the United Kingdom in the 20th century.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait examines Ahuna Mons, a muddy and icy volcano on Ceres, and looks at the nebula Westerhout 40.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the recent mass release of data from a SETI project, and notes the discovery of two vaguely Earth-like worlds orbiting the very dim Teegarden’s Star, just 12 light-years away.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes that having universities as a safe space for trans people does not infringe upon academic freedom.
  • The Crux looks at the phenomenon of microsleep.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the Milky Way Galaxy was warped a billion years ago by a collision with dark matter-heavy dwarf galaxy Antlia 2, and notes a robotic fish powered by a blood analogue.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that India plans on building its own space station.
  • Earther notes the recording of the song of the endangered North Pacific right whale.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the role of emotional labour in leisure activities.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Japan prepared for the Battle of the Leyte Gulf in 1944.
  • Gizmodo looks at astronomers’ analysis of B14-65666, an ancient galactic collision thirteen billion light-years away, and notes that the European Space Agency has a planned comet interception mission.
  • io9 notes how the plan for Star Trek in the near future is to not only have more Star Trek, but to have many different kinds of Star Trek for different audiences.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the observation of Pete Buttigieg that the US has probably already had a gay president.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the many ways in which the rhetoric of Celtic identity has been used, and notes that the archerfish uses water ejected from its eyes to hunt.
  • Language Hat looks at why Chinese is such a hard language to learn for second-language learners, and looks at the Suso monastery in Spain, which played a key role in the coalescence of the Spanish language.
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of katakana.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the death of deposed Egypt president Mohammed Morsi looks like a slow-motion assassination, and notes collapse of industrial jobs in the Ohio town of Lordstown, as indicative of broader trends.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the death of Mohamed Morsi.
  • The Map Rom Blog shares a new British Antarctic Survey map of Greenland and the European Arctic.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how non-religious people are becoming much more common in the Middle East, and makes the point that the laying of cable for the transatlantic telegraph is noteworthy technologically.
  • Noah Smith at Noahpionion takes the idea of the Middle East going through its own version of the Thirty Years War seriously. What does this imply?
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at a Lebanon balanced somehow on the edge, and looks at the concentration camp system of the United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains what people should expect from LightSail 2, noting that the LightSail 2 has launched.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw points readers to his stories on Australian spy Harry Freame.
  • Rocky Planet explains, in the year of the Apollo 50th anniversary, why the Moon matters.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews, and praises, South African film Kanarie, a gay romp in the apartheid era.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper examining the relationship between childcare and fertility in Belgium, and looks at the nature of statistical data from Turkmenistan.
  • The Strange Maps Blog shares a map highlighting different famous people in the United States.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why different galaxies have different amounts of dark matter, and shares proof that the Apollo moon landings actually did happen.
  • Towleroad notes the new evidence that poppers, in fact, are not addictive.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the parlous state of the Volga River.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes an extended look at the mid-20th century gay poet Frank O’Hara.

[URBAN NOTE] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the possibility that our model for the evolution of galaxies might be partially disproven by Big Data.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly reports how she did her latest article for the New York Times.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the beginning of a search for habitable-zone planets around Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • The Crux looks at how the skull trophies of the ancient Maya help explain civilizational collapse.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting that our humble, seemingly stable Sun can produce superflares.
  • Dead Things reports on the latest informed speculation about the sense of smell of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares the NASA report on its progress towards the Lunar Gateway station.
  • Gizmodo looks at the growing number of China’s beautiful, deadly, blooms of bioluminescent algae.
  • io9 reports that Stjepan Sejic has a new series with DC, exploring the inner life of Harley Quinn.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at an example of a feminist musical, the Chantal Akerman The Eighties.
  • Language Hat links to a review of a dystopian novel by Yoko Tawada, The Emissary, imagining a future Japan where the learning of foreign languages is banned.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that history, and the writing of history, is an actual profession with skills and procedures writers in the field need to know.
  • Liam Shaw writes at the LRB Blog about how people in London, late in the Second World War, coped with the terrifying attacks of V2 rockets.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new book, Wayfinding, about the neuroscience of navigation.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reviews a Robert Zubrin book advocating the colonization of space and finds himself unconvinced.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the ancient comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko explored by the ESA Rosetta probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms provides tips for visitors to the Paraguay capital of Asuncion.
  • Peter Rukavina reports that, on the day the new PEI legislature came in, 105% of Island electricity came from windpower.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel argues that, in searching for life, we should not look for exoplanets very like Earth.
  • Strange Company shares another weekend collection of diverse links.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little shares the views of Margaret Gilbert on social facts.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Kadyrov might dream of a broad Greater Chechnya, achieved at the expense of neighbouring republics.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some superhero identity crises, of Superman and of others.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Larry Claes at Centauri Dreams considers the issues of the alien featuring in the title of the classic The Thing, facing human persecution.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber starts a debate about past blogging and conventional wisdom.
  • The Crux reports on a mass rescue of orphaned flamingo chicks in South Africa.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that asteroids provided perhaps half of the Earth’s current supply of water.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at how the far-right in Germany is appropriating artworks to support its view of history.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China may be hoping to build a base at the Moon’s south pole by 2029.
  • Far Outliers reports on the 1865 collapse of the Confederacy.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers have identified the approximate location of a kilonova that seeded the nascent solar system with heavy elements.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the news from yet another study demonstrating that HIV cannot be transmitted by HIV-undetectable people. U=U.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, via Herb Caen, the Beat Generation became known as Beatniks.
  • Language Hat shares and comments upon a passage from Dostoevsky noting how an obscenity can be stretched out into an entire conversation.
  • Language Log considers a peculiarity of the Beijing dialect.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how statehood has been used to game the American political system.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that countries with greater levels of gender inequality are more likely to produce female chess grandmasters.
  • Justin Petrone at North!, considering the history of writers in Estonia, considers what the mission of the writer should be.
  • The NYR Daily examines the black people once miners in the Kentucky town of Lynch, remembering and sharing their experiences.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers what he has learned from a recent research and writing contract.
  • Jason C. Davis at the Planetary Society Blog reports in greater detail on the crater Hayabusa 2 made in asteroid Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how the Event Horizon Telescope acts like a mirror.
  • Strange Company shares an impressively diverse collection of links.
  • Towleroad talks with writer Tim Murphy about his new novel, Correspondents.
  • Window on Eurasia considers future directions for Ukrainian language policy.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the artistic riches horded by the Nazis in the Bavarian castle of Neuschwanstein.

  • Hornet Stories reports on Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore, two Jewish stepsisters and lovers who resisted the Nazis on the Channel Islands.
  • CBC Montreal recently revisited the homophobic 1989 murder of Joe Rose, a crime that galvanized gay activism in that city.
  • The story of a lesbian subject of a recent Queer Eye episode who now subject of crowdfunding efforts to send her back to college is lovely. NBC News reports.
  • This them article takes a look at the role played by Dan Levy in the creation of Schitt’s Creek as a fictional community where LGBTQ people exist but homophobia is just not an issue. It’s refreshing.
  • This post at Reddit’s daystrominstitute makes the argument that the “evil bisexuals” of the Mirror Universe are easily explained by Terrans living in a civilization where sexuality is a matter and vehicle of domination, not necessarily by homophobia.

[DM] Some news inks: Montréal & Calcutta migration, Chinese languages, former Soviet Union, borders

I’ve a new links post up at Demography Matters.

  • La Presse notes that suburbanization proceeds in Montréal, as migration from the island of Montréal to off-island suburbs grows. This is of perhaps particular note in a Québec where demographics, particularly related to language dynamics, have long been a preoccupation, the island of Montréal being more multilingual than its suburbs.
  • The blog Far Outliers has been posting excerpts from The Epic City: The World on the Streets of Calcutta, a 2018 book by Kushanava Choudhury. One brief excerpt touches upon the diversity of Calcutta’s migrant population.
  • The South China Morning Post has posted some interesting articles about language dynamics. In one, the SCMP suggests that the Cantonese language is falling out of use among young people in Guangzhou, largest Cantonese-speaking city by population. Does this hint at decline in other Chinese languages? Another, noting how Muslim Huiare being pressured to shut down Arabic-medium schools, is more foreboding.
  • Ukrainian demographics blogger pollotenchegg is back with a new map of Soviet census data from 1990, one that shows the very different population dynamics of some parts of the Soviet Union. The contrast between provincial European Russia and southern Central Asia is outstanding.
  • In the area of the former Soviet Union, scholar Otto Pohl has recently examined how people from the different German communities of southeast Europe were, at the end of the Second World War, taken to the Soviet Union as forced labourers. The blog Window on Eurasia, meanwhile, has noted that the number of immigrants to Russia are falling, with Ukrainians diminishing particularly in number while Central Asian numbers remain more resistant to the trend.
  • Finally, JSTOR Daily has observed the extent to which border walls represent, ultimately, a failure of politics.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • D-Brief considers the possibility that human food when eaten by bears, by shortening their hibernation periods, might contribute to their premature aging.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the political power of sports and of music.
  • Far Outliers notes the rising bourgeoisie of Calcutta in the 1990s.
  • Steve Roby at The Fifteenth makes the case for Discovery as worthy of being considered Star Trek, not least because it is doing something new.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing notes how our tendency to track our lives through data can become dystopian.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that Illinois is starting to become home to resident populations of bald eagles.
  • Language Log takes a look at Ubykh.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a Trumpist Canadian border guard.
  • The New APPS Blog notes how helicopter parenting is linked to rising levels of inequality.
  • The NYR Daily considers Jasper Johns.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane considers the rhythms and cycles of life generally and of being a writer specifically.
  • Otto Pohl looks at how people from the different German communities of southeast Europe were, at the end of the Second World War, taken to the Soviet Union as forced labourers.
  • Steve Maynard writes at Spacing, in the aftermath of the death of Jackie Shane, about the erasure and recovery of non-white queer history in Toronto.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains what would happen if someone fell into a blackhole.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the number of immigrants to Russia are falling, with Ukrainians diminishing particularly in number while Central Asian numbers remain more resistant to the trend.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the telling omission of sexual orientation as a protected category re: hate crimes.

[AH] Five alternate history maps from r/imaginarymaps (#alternatehistory)

Reddit’s imaginarymaps forum has a lot of great alternate history maps.

  • This r/imaginarymaps map depicts a Dutch Formosa crica 1900.
  • This creation imagines a joint German-Polish invasion of the Soviet Union.
  • this map imagines a different Cold War, with a largely Communist Germany opposed by a Franco-British Union.
  • This map of an alternate Cold War circa 1960 that actually made it into a history book as our timeline
  • This map shows the remarkably fragmented Central America of Marvel Comics’s famous Earth-616.