A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘sexuality

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul takes a look at “infrastructural scars”, at geopolitically-inspired constructions like border fences and fortifications.
  • Centauri Dreams notes what we can learn from 99942 Apophis during its 2029 close approach to Earth, just tens of thousands of kilometres away.
  • D-Brief reports on the reactions of space artists to the photograph of the black hole at the heart of M87.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the first recording of Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Germany has begun work on drafting laws to cover space mining.
  • Gizmodo reports on what scientists have learned from the imaging of a very recent impact of an asteroid on the near side of the Moon.
  • io9 makes the case that Star Trek: Discovery should try to tackle climate change.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Verizon is seeking a buyer for Tumblr. (Wouldn’t it be funny if it was bought, as other reports suggest might be possible, by Pornhub?)
  • JSTOR Daily reports on a 1910 examination of medical schools that, among other things, shut down all but two African-American medical schools with lasting consequences for African-American health.
  • Language Log asks why “Beijing” is commonly pronounced as “Beizhing”.
  • Simon Balto asks at Lawyers, Guns and Money why the murder of Justine Ruszczyk by a Minneapolis policeman is treated more seriously than other police killings, just because she was white and the cop was black. All victims deserve the same attention.
  • Russell Darnley at Maximos62 shares a video of the frieze of the Parthenon.
  • The NYR Daily responds to the 1979 television adaptation of the Primo Levi novel Christ Stopped at Eboli, an examination of (among other things) the problems of development.
  • Peter Rukavina is entirely right about the practical uselessness of QR codes.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society points readers towards the study of organizations, concentrating on Charles Perrow.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the argument of one Russian commentator that Russia should offer to extend citizenship en masse not only to Ukrainians but to Belarusians, the better to undermine independent Belarus.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of some of his flourishing flowers, as his home of Palo Alto enters a California summer.

[NEWS] Five #Indigenous links: land ownership, astronomy, Pueblo, transgender, MakadeMigize

  • JSTOR Daily looks at the myth that land ownership was not present in pre-Columbian Indigenous cultures in the Americas.
  • CBC takes a look at Indigenous traditions of astronomy.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how white female reformers of the early 20th century US tried to repress the sacred dances of the Pueblo peoples, and why.
  • CBC had a great feature about how Cree doctor James Makokis uses Indigenous perspectives to treat his trans clientele.
  • This report about MakadeMigize Clothing, a company created by a Manitoba family whose clothes are inspired by Indigenous languages. Global News covers the issue.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: loonie, Alberta, Jess Guilbeaux, Grindr and Blued, The Matrix

  • CBC reports on the controversies surrounding the creation of a loonie one-dollar coin celebrating the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality.
  • Daily Xtra reports on the consequences of the election of Jason Kenney and the rise of the UCP to power in Alberta for LGBTQ people.
  • This VICE interview with Queer Eye subject Jess Guilbeaux on her experiences being black and lesbian in Kansas is inspiring.
  • This Radiichina article, noting American concerns over Chinese ownership of Grindr, looks on China’s similar and arguably more successful app Blued.
  • This fascinating Vox article by Emily Sandalwood looks at how the Wachowskis represented the trans experience in the Matrix trilogy.

[NEWS] Five culture links: AO3, dating apps, mainstream Islamophobia, Notre Dame, Buttigieg

  • That Archive Of Our Own has won a Hugo nomination is surprising, but deserved, news. Motherboard reports.
  • CityLab notes that people interested in opposite-sex dating, when they make use of apps, look for people near them geographically.
  • NOW Toronto looks at the extent to which anti-Muslim sentiment has made it into mainstream journalistic discourse in Canada.
  • Adam Rogers writes movingly at Wired about the extent to which Notre Dame, for all of its age, is also constantly changing.
  • Vox suggests that Pete Buttigieg, with his rhetoric full of hope, is trying to mobilize the same coalition of voters that saw Obama elected.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: sex work, front doors, Eglinton East, TTC, past subways

  • Helen Armstrong at NOW Toronto writes against the crude repression, well short of constructive regulation, facing sex workers in Toronto.
  • Donovan Vincent at the Toronto Star notes the Toronto controversy around the idea of having houses with two front doors, including one for a basement unit. Why must that unit’s residents be hidden?
  • blogTO notes the utter absence of the Eglinton East LRT in the new Toronto transit plan.
  • Steve Munro considers the poor state of planning, and funding, for Line 1 of the subway.
  • Toronto Life goes back more than a century to take a look at the many discarded plans for subways. Is it comfort, at least, that the lack of good planning is a trait apparently inherent to Torontonians?

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkable imaging of the atmosphere of HR 8799 e.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about books that, once picked up, turned out to be as good as promised.
  • The Crux considers obsidian, known in the Game of Thrones world as dragonglass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that NASA is considering a proposal for a floating Venus probe that would be recharged by microwaves from orbit.</li.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a report that Russia has developed a new satellite to work with a new anti-satellite weapons system.
  • Far Outliers notes what U.S. Grant learned from the Mexican-American War, as a strategist and as a politician.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing suggests, drawing from the image of M87*, that we have had a world disenchanted by the digital technology used to produce the image.
  • JSTOR Daily shares what critical theory has to say about the binge-watching of television.
  • Language Hat notes the Cherokee-language inscriptions on the wall of Manitou Cave.
  • Language Log considers when the first conversing automaton was built.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at a corner of 1970s feminism forgotten despite its innovative ideas.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the idea of restricting some new migrants to particular regions of the United States.
  • The NYR Daily explores the important new work by Igiaba Scego, Beyond Babylon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers a surprisingly complex question: What is an electron?
  • Window on Eurasia explains why the cost of a professional military means Russia will not abandon the draft.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores “johnson” as a euphemism for penis.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes a push by astronomers to enlist help for giving trans-Neptunian object 2007-OR10 a name.
  • Centauri Dreams reflects on M87*, the supermassive black hole at the heart of M87 recently imaged, with its implications for galactic habitability.
  • Crooked Timber is right to note that Kirstjen Nielsen, architect of the cruel border policies of Trump, should not be allowed to resume a normal professional life.
  • The Crux looks at the Event Horizon Telescope Project that imaged M87*.
  • D-Brief notes that one-quarter of Japanese in their 20s and 30s have remained virgins, and explains why this might be the case.
  • Far Outliers notes the process of the writing of U.S. Grant’s acclaimed memoirs.
  • Mark Graham highlights a BBC documentary, one he contributed to, asking if artificial intelligence will kill global development.
  • Gizmodo explains why the image of black hole M87* does not look exactly like the fictional one from the scientifically-grounded Interstellar.
  • Hornet Stories explains the joys of Hawai’i in fall.
  • io9 notes that the new Deep Space Nine anniversary documentary is scheduled for a one-day theatrical release. (Will it be in Toronto?)
  • JSTOR Daily makes the point that mass enfranchisement is the best way to ensure security for all.
  • Language Hat looks at the kitabs, the books written in Afrikaans using its original Arabic script kept by Cape Malays.
  • Language Log notes, with examples, some of the uses of the words “black” and “evil” in contemporary China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that having a non-octogenarian president is a good idea.
  • Marginal Revolution shares the thoughts of Samir Varma on the new technologies–better computers, faster travel, artificial life–that may change the world in the near future.
  • The NYR Daily explores the subversive fairy tales of 19th century Frenchman Édouard Laboulaye.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the sad crash of the Beresheet probe on the surface of the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome engages with the body of work of out horror writer John Saul.
  • Peter Rukavina maps out where Islanders will be voting, and the distances they will travel, in this month’s election.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel engages with the possibility that we might be alone. What next? (Myself, I think the idea of humanity as an elder race is fascinating.)
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the sort of humour that involves ambiguous adverbs.