A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘sexuality

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams shares a cool design for a mid-21st century Triton landing mission.
  • Crooked Timber argues American conservative intellectuals have descended to hackwork.
  • D-Brief notes the surprisingly important role that eyebrows may have played in human evolution.
  • Dead Things notes how a hominid fossil discovery in the Arabian desert suggests human migration to Africa occurred almost 90 thousand years ago, longer than previously believed.
  • Hornet Stories notes that biphobia in the LGBTQ community is one factor discouraging bisexuals from coming out.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox gives a favourable review to Wendell Berry’s latest, The Art of Loading Brush.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the connections between Roman civilization and poisoning as a means for murder.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the early 20th century American practice of redlining, denying minorities access to good housing, still marks the maps of American cities.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the 1948 assassination of reformer Gaitan in Bogota changed Colombia and Latin America, touching the lives of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Fidel Castro.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that Spacing has launched a new contest, encouraging creators of inventive maps of Canadian cities to do their work.
  • The NYR Daily notes a new exhibit of Victorian art that explores its various mirrored influences, backwards and forwards.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Jason Davis explores TESS, the next generation of planet-hunting astronomy satellite from NASA.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares photos of planetary formation around sun-like star TW Hydrae.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that a combination of urbanization, Russian government policy, and the influence of pop culture is killing off minority languages in Russia.
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[NEWS] Five LGBT links: Village killings of the 1970s, Grindr, Fire Island, Steve Rogers’ Brooklyn

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  • This long-form CBC article on a string of unsolved murders of gay men in the late 1970s is compelling, frightening reading.
  • Daily Xtra recently shared a Body Politic article from the 1970s by the late great Robin Hardy on the mysterious killings of gay men at the time. (Visibility, as Hardy suggests, can save lives.)
  • The suggestion that excessive dependency on Grindr and similar apps is not helping queer men form rewarding relationships does not sound inherently implausible to me. Vox has it.
  • Hornet Stories shares a guide to Fire Island, here.
  • Things With Wings looks at the history of New York City and Brooklyn and finds out that the neighbourhood where Steven Rogers lived in the 1930s and 1940s, Brooklyn Heights, was actually a mecca of out queer people and communities.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait suggests that strange markings in the upper atmosphere of Venus might well be evidence of life in that relatively Earth-like environment.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly raves over Babylon Berlin.
  • Centauri Dreams considers, fifty years after its publication, Clarke’s 2001.
  • Crooked Timber considers Kevin Williamson in the context of conservative intellectual representation more generally.
  • D-Brief considers “digisexuality”, the fusion of the digital world with sexuality. (I think we’re quite some way off, myself.)
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers evidence suggesting that the agricultural revolution in ancient Anatolia was achieved without population replacement from the Fertile Crescent.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the flight of Apollo 6, a flight that helped iron out problem with the Saturn V.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas is not impressed by the idea of the trolley problem, as something that allows for the displacement of responsibility.
  • Gizmodo explains why the faces of Neanderthals were so different from the faces of modern humans.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if volcano-driven climate change helped the rise of Christianity.
  • Language Log considers, after Spinoza, the idea that vowels are the souls of consonants.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money engages in a bit of speculation: What would have happened had Clinton won? (Ideological gridlock, perhaps.)
  • Lovesick Cyborg explores how the advent of the cheap USB memory stick allowed North Koreans to start to enjoy K-Pop.
  • Russell Darnley considers the transformation of the forests of Indonesia’s Riau forest from closed canopy forest to plantations.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some praise of inset maps.
  • Neuroskeptic considers how ketamine may work as an anti-depressant.
  • The NYR Daily considers student of death, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross.
  • Justin Petrone of north! shares an anecdote from the Long Island coastal community of Greenport.
  • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw considers the iconic Benjamin Wolfe painting The Death of General Wolfe.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Casey Dreier notes cost overruns for the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • pollotenchegg maps recent trends in natural increase and decrease in Ukraine.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about a special Hverabrauð in Iceland, baked in hot springs.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares his own proposal for a new Drake Equation, revised to take account of recent discoveries.
  • Vintage Space considers how the American government would have responded if John Glenn had died in the course of his 1962 voyage into space.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the belief among many Russians that had Beria, not Khrushchev, succeeded Stalin, the Soviet Union might have been more successful.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new research suggesting that all modern Australian Aborigine languages descend from a single ancestor more than ten thousands years ago.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the search for one’s spiritual home.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the planned ESA ARIEL mission, intended to study exoplanet formation and atmospheres.
  • Crooked Timber considers the prospects for the university in the United Kingdom, post-strike.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting the worlds of TRAPPIST-1 might be too wet, too water-rich, to sustain life.
  • Cody Delistraty shares an interview with Nancy Jo Sales on everything from childhood to Facebook.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of human footprints on the seafloor off of British Columbia, predating the Ice Age.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that ocean worlds in the “ice cap zone” could manage to support life
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the observations to date of near-Jovian analogue world Epsilon Indi Ab.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes ambitious plans by one private space development company to set up a functioning cislunar economy.
  • Hornet Stories notes the upcoming re-release of Garbage’s second album, Version 2.0.
  • In A State of Migration’s Lyman Stone takes a look at the regional origins of German immigrants to the US in the mid-19th century.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Grindr shares private user data with third parties that, among other things, would allow them to determine the HIV status of different individuals.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the struggle for equal civil rights in Alaska, as indigenous people fought for equality.
  • The NYR Daily reports on an interesting exhibit of post-Second World War modern art from Germany.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: monogamy study, The Ritz, Toronto police, safe dating, Inkollo

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  • A viral study claiming young gay men overwhelmingly prefer monogamy turns out to have used very poor data-gathering techniques. Slate reports.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at The Ritz, a 1977 mainstream film that made use of gay culture and bathhouses. How does it read nowadays?
  • The Toronto Police Service has made an application to Pride Toronto to walk, as a contingent, in this year’s parade. This year may not be the best year for that. CBC reports.
  • This safe date app designed for queer men of colour by a Toronto group is timely. It’s just sad that it’s needed. NOW Toronto reports.
  • Hornet Stories links to the online art, at Instagram, of gay comics artist Inkollo.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal for unmanned probe missions to future incoming extrasolar asteroids like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux considers, in the context of recent (perhaps surprising) context, how scientists will one day record dreams.
  • Hornet Stories shares the report on a poll of younger gay people about the idea of monogamous relations versus open ones, suggesting there are signs a strong preference for monogamy isn’t well thought out.
  • Imageo notes that global warming, by leading to the breakup of icecaps, will worsen the sea ice hazard to maritime shipping.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how social workers are called to support serious social reform.
  • Language Hat notes a monument to the Cyrillic alphabet erected in Antarctica by Bulgarians.
  • In the era of Trump, Lingua Franca takes a look at the origin of the phrase “useful idiots”.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent article observing the decline of German cuisine in the United States. Who, or what, will save it?
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla talks about the latest exciting discoveries from Titan, including the odd distribution of nitrogen in its atmosphere and surface.
  • Towleroad notes how the discomfort of Ben Carson with transgender people leads him to consider the needs of homeless transgender people as secondary to this discomfort.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Cossacks in Russia are close to gaining recognition as a separate people.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests–jokes?–that intellectual history from 1900 can be explained substantially in terms of the uncritical adoption of a nomad science, starting from race science and continuing to today with Harry Potter.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a post reporting on a PhD student’s thesis, studying features of Chicano English.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani looks at the classical Mayan trade in pets, dogs and cats particularly.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage cheesecake ads for video and arcade games from 1980s Japan.
  • Dead Things considers an examination of the thesis that the fabulous horns of some dinosaurs were used as sexual signals.
  • Hornet Stories nominates some queer people to get stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
  • JSTOR Daily tells the story of Bobbi Gibb, the woman who in 1966 crashed the Boston Marathon.
  • Language Hattells of Toty Samed, an Angolan musician who writes songs not in the now-dominant Portuguese but in his ancestral Kimbundu.
  • Steven Attewell at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the ways in which the metaphor of mutants has been used by Marvel Comics to explore themes of racism and marginalization.
  • At the LRB Blog, Matthew Porges notes how European Union opposition to the annexation of Western Sahara by Morocco is counterbalanced by the need to keep Morocco as a partner.
  • r/mapporn shared a beautiful map of the Great Lakes, Nayanno-Nibiimaang Gichigamiin or “The Five Freshwater Seas”, from the Ojibwe perspective.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Christian Tate’s transit-style map of Middle Earth.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an essay arguing against the United States’ dropping the penny and the nickel, on the grounds that these expensive coins are loss-leaders for currency generally.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at early 20th century Russian philosopher Ivan Ilyan, a man whose influence is visible in the Putin era.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the eye-catching male photography of Ekaterina Zakharova.
  • David Post’s analysis at the Volokh Conspiracy of the contract between Stormy Daniels and Donald Trump is a must-read.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian government has failed to cultivate soft power, or wider influence, in the West.