A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘shopping

[PHOTO] Coffee Time by the towers (and Food Basics), Dupont and Lansdowne

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Coffee Time by the towers (and Food Basics) #toronto #dupontstreet #wallaceemerson #coffeetime #foodbasics #condos #towers

I stopped off at the Coffee Time on the northeast corner of Dupont and Lansdowne this afternoon en route to Big on Bloor Festival, picking up a jumbo coffee and a beef samosa before I veered south onto Lansdowne towards Bloordale. I blogged about this restaurant and its (to my mind) unfairly grim reputation. (My Flickr link is here.) This time, as I approached the restaurant from the east, I saw the Food Basics grocery store lying just to the west, I thought about the controversy around this store and its neighbourhood.

This Food Basics is an anchor store for the Fuse Condos development, on the northwest of Dupont and Lansdowne. This new grocery store opening was welcome by some, who saw no reason this store could not co-exist with the FreshCo in the Galleria Mall just a few minutes east at Dupont and Dufferin. To some, this was a betrayal: Fuse Condos had produced a Metro grocery store, a higher-end grocery store with more selection, and some buyers were quite upset. There was even a petition calling for a Metro.

All this was satirized in The Beaverton, and aptly analyzed in the Toronto Star by Edward Keenan. Keenan pointed out that this behaviour was wildly out of place given the decidedly working-class nature of Wallace Emerson. Food Basics, obviously, got installed regardless.

Still: how long will this neighbourhood, this cluster of west-end neighbourhoods, remain what it has been? I wonder.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.
  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.
  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.

[PHOTO] Three front windows of three West Queen West fashion stores

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Toronto’s West Queen West, along Queen Street West to the west of Bathurst, is home to many small indie fashion stores. Late at night, the front windows of stores like Mericani (630A Queen Street West), WTFash (632 Queen Street West), and The Store on Queen (662 Queen Street West), look almost like art gallery displays.

West Queen West fashion (1) #toronto #queenstreetwest #westqueenwest #queerstreetwest #fashion

West Queen West fashion (2) #toronto #queenstreetwest #westqueenwest #queerstreetwest #fashion

West Queen West fashion (3)  #toronto #queenstreetwest #westqueenwest #queerstreetwest #fashion

Written by Randy McDonald

July 16, 2017 at 7:00 am

[PHOTO] Four photos of the Pride rainbow colours at Loblaws 60 Carlton

After seven years of vacancy, the Maple Leaf Gardens building on Church and Carlton that had once housed the home area of the Toronto Maple Leafs became a Loblaws grocery store in 2011. Because of its size and its storied location, Loblaws 60 Carlton is arguably one of the chain’s flagship stores. Because of its location on Church Street, Carlton Street in fact being one of several possible southern termini of Church and Wellesley, the store’s merchandise is also regularly tricked out in the rainbow colours of Pride when this season comes about.

Loblaws rainbow (1)

Loblaws rainbow (2)

Loblaws rainbow (3)

Loblaws rainbow (4)

Written by Randy McDonald

June 26, 2017 at 2:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Big Picture shares shocking photos of the Portuguese forest fires.
  • blogTO notes that, happily, Seaton Village’s Fiesta Farms is apparently not at risk of being turned into a condo development site.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new starship discussion group in Delft. Shades of the British Interplanetary Society and the Daedalus?
  • D-Brief considers a new theory explaining why different birds’ eggs have different shapes.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas commits himself to a new regimen of blogging about technology and its imports. (There is a Patreon.)
  • Language Hat notes the current Turkish government’s interest in purging Turkish of Western loanwords.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair sums up the evidence for the diffusion of Indo-European languages, and their speakers, into India.
  • The LRB Blog notes the Theresa May government’s inability post-Grenfell to communicate with any sense of emotion.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen wonders if the alt-right more prominent in the Anglophone world because it is more prone to the appeal of the new.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw wonders if Brexit will result in a stronger European Union and a weaker United Kingdom.
  • Seriously Science reports a study suggesting that shiny new headphones are not better than less flashy brands.
  • Torontoist reports on the anti-Muslim hate groups set to march in Toronto Pride.
  • Understanding Society considers the subject of critical realism in sociological analyses.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia’s call to promote Cyrillic across the former Soviet Union has gone badly in Armenia, with its own script.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes that the old HMV store in the Dufferin Mall is now a fidget spinner store. This has gone viral.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her week in Paris.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one paper examining the complex formation of the dense TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Far Outliers reports from early 20th century Albania, about how tribal and language and ethnic identities overlap, and not.
  • Language Log notes efforts to promote Cantonese in the face of Mandarin.
  • The LRB Blog wonders if May’s electoral defeat might lead to the United Kingdom changing its Brexit trajectory.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that cars have more complex computer programming these days than fighter jets.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the counter-cyclical Brazilian fiscal cap still makes no sense.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is edging towards an acknowledgement of its involvement in the Ukrainian war.

[LINK] “Spotify Hits 50 Million Paid Subscribers, Lifting Music Industry”

Bloomberg’s Lucas Shaw notes that although Spotify is not yet profitable, it has managed to accumulate quite a few subscribers. Will this be enough to let it last?

Spotify has surpassed 50 million subscribers, extending its lead over rivals Apple Music, SoundCloud and Google as the world’s largest paid music streaming service.

The service, owned by Stockholm-based Spotify Ltd., has been growing at a breakneck pace. The company said it had 30 million subscribers less than a year ago, and 40 million subscribers in September. Apple Inc., owner of the second-largest paid service, said last month its streaming service has more than 20 million customers.

Adding paying customers will help Spotify pitch investors, who expect the company to file for an initial public offering and are looking for signs the company can convert its growing subscriber base into a sustainable business. Spotify, which is unprofitable, generates almost all of its sales from subscriptions, though the music service also has tens of millions of additional users who listen for free, supported by advertising.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 3, 2017 at 6:45 pm