A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘siberia

[PHOTO] Three photos of two meteorites at the AMNH (@amnh)

leave a comment »

Ahnighito, a fragment of the massive Cape York meteorite that itself masses 31 tons, is immense. The fact that the museum was able to transfer this fragment from its Greenland home to here is itself an achievement. The displayed fragment of the similar Sikhote-Alin meteorite, which impacted the Russian Maritime Territory in 1947 is smaller, but the fact of these fragments’ existence–shards of solid iron bodies sheared into pieces by the force of impact–is humbling. The universe is so vast.

Me and Ahnighito #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #ahnighito #ahnighitometerorite #meteorite #iron #amnh #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram #greenland

Ahnighito #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #amnh #ahnighito #ahnighitometeorite #greenland #meteorite #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram

Fragment of Sikhote-Alin #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #amnh #sikhotealin #meteorite #iron #siberia #russianfareast #primorye #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram

Advertisements

[ISL] Five islands notes: Caribbean and Jamaica migration, Diomedes, Indonesia, Finland

leave a comment »

  • Lyman Stone, at In A State of Migration, takes a look at the slow population growth in even the well-off Caribbean, thanks to substantial emigration.
  • At Jamaica Observer, Edward Seaga summarizes the history of Jamaican emigration–economically necessary–and worries about the impact of Trump.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Big Diomede and Little Diomede, two islands in the Bering Strait that not only have different sovereigns (the US and Russia) but different dates, too.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at how the indigenous population of Siberut, an Indonesian island west of Sumatra, are dealing with the effects of deforestation and cultural disruption.
  • Global News reports on an entrepreneur who wants to make an island in Finland into a women-only resort.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope writes about why he reads so little science fiction these days. (Too little plausible world-building and exploration of our world, he argues.)
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait enthuses about the Falcon Heavy launch yesterday, while Lawyers, Guns and Money is much less impressed with the Falcon Heavy launch, calling it representative of the new global plutocracy.
  • The Buzz shares some of the favourite books of 2017 of staff members at the Toronto Public Library.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the recent study providing tantalizing data hinting at the potential environments of the TRAPPIST-1 planets.
  • Cody Delistraty links to an essay of his analyzing the grand strategy of Macron for France, and for Europe.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on how one man’s nostalgia for the 1990s led him to create a video rental store.
  • Gizmodo reports on how scientists made, under conditions of exceptional heat and pressure, a new kind of ice that may exist in the cores of Uranus and Neptune.
  • Hornet Stories takes pointed issue with an astonishingly tone-deaf essay that demonstrates the existence of racism in the leather community.
  • JSTOR Daily links to papers suggesting that referenda are not necessarily good for democracy.
  • Language Hat looks at the surprisingly profound roots of singing in nonsense, in different cultures and over the age of the individual.
  • The LRB Blog reports from a visit paid by one of its writers to the US embassy in London so disdained by Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that there has been a consistent slowing of gains to life expectancy in rich countries since 1950, hinting perhaps at a maximum lifespan (for now?).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the ozone hole has stopped repairing itself, quite possibly because of global warming.
  • Towleroad reports on a sort of brunch-based passing of the torch from the old five castmembers of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy to the new five.
  • Window on Eurasia shares what seems to be a fair take on the history of Jews in Siberia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

leave a comment »

  • Kambiz at Anthropology.net notes evidence that Neanderthals in Italy used fire to shape digging sticks 170 thousand years ago.
  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross reminds online commentators to be careful and reasonable in their speculations online, if only because these last forever.
  • D-Brief notes a new study of the TRAPPIST-1 system suggesting that its outermost planets, in the circumstellar habitable zone, are so low density that they must have abundant volatiles. Water is the most likely candidate.
  • Hornet Stories introduces readers to the impressive photography of New York City’s Peter Hujar.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox meditates on the issues of friendship in the contemporary world.
  • Joe. My. God. shares representative Tammy Duckworth’s mockery of the authoritarian Donald Trump, aka “Cadet Bone Spurs”.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the continuing importance of the films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that someone has made cute maps of seven solar system worlds for children.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an article looking at how some of the schoolgirls abducted in Nigeria by Boko Haram are doing.
  • The NYR Daily engages with “Soul of a Nation”, a touring exhibit of African-American art in the era of Black Power.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports from the scene of the impending Falcon Heavy launch, sharing photos.
  • Towleroad notes a South African church that not only beats its queer parishoners but fines them, too.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests</u. Western sanctions could hinder the Russian development of its Arctic presence.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross takes a look at the dystopian future we’ve created for ourselves with the help of Big Data.
  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology net notes the discovery of an Ancient Beringian population involved in the peopling of the Americas.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the awesome possibility of life on pulsar planets, i.e. on planets that survived or were made by a supernova.
  • Centauri Dreams suggests that dust, not ET artifacts, may explain the odd light coming from KIC 8462852, aka Boyajian’s Star.
  • Crooked Timber considers the surprisingly mixed emotions of unions regarding the idea of a guaranteed minimum income.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at the diverse non-German soldiers serving in occupied France in the Second World War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers parallels between the mentality of Silicon Valley and totalitarianism.
  • Hornet Stories considers the questionable idea of a “gold star” or “platinum star” gay person. What, exactly, is being celebrated?
  • JSTOR Daily notes the gendered nature of the supermarket of mid-20th century North America.
  • Language Hat celebrates the establishment of Hakka as an official language in Taiwan, as does Language Log.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues that the previous Oregon laws against self-service gas stations helped boost employment for the vulnerable.
  • Lingua Franca considers the concept of “ghosting”, linguistically at otherwise.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining how creativity has clustered in cities in the past.
  • Out There shares the arguments of Charles Miller for infrastructure to support crewed expansion and settlement in space, starting with the Moon.
  • Peter Rukavina talks about his last visit, with his son, to the Sears store in Charlottetown.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that 2018 may be the year we finally take a picture of a black hole, Sagittarius A* in the heart of our galaxy.
  • To what extent is history probabilistic? Understanding Society considers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes controversy in Siberia over Chinese investors who come in and disregard local sensitivities and regulations.

[CAT] Three cat links: Siberian cats, declaring in Canada, Cat People

  • Bored Panda shares photos of the gorgeous Siberian cats that populate a farm deep in Russian Asia, here.
  • Will Saskatchewan be the next Canadian province, after Nova Scotia, to ban the declawing of cats? Global News reports.
  • This New York Times profile of Julius Motal, a photographer doing a documentary on cat culture, really catches my interest.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 16, 2017 at 11:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days recently spent in Washington D.C. I would like to go there myself, I think, and for more than a quick bus transfer in the night.
  • Crooked Timber considers what the upper classes of the United States are getting from the new tax cuts.
  • Daily JSTOR considers the ethics of having the art of Banksy displayed in the occupied West Bank. Is it ethical?
  • Far Outliers notes the impact of missionary organizations on the US Peace Corps.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas notes that the “we” used in talk about technology does not include everyone, that it is a selective “we.”
  • Imageo shares satellite imagery of the Arctic suggesting this winter in North America will be a harsh one.
  • Language Hat links to an article noting the dialect of English that refugees on the Greek island of Lesbos have developed.
  • The LRB Blog shares a report of a visit to the Estonian National Museum, and a reflection on the mythology of nationhood.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper claiming legalized abortion, not birth control, played the leading role in the emancipation of American women.
  • The NYR Daily notes the cult of personality surrounding Obama.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders what happened to the Afro-Argentines, numerous until the 19th century.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a reading of the classic gay Canadian play Fortune and Men’s Eyes, scheduled for the 11th at Buddies in Bad Times.
  • Window on Eurasia links to a scholarly examination of the Soviet annexation of once-independent Tannu Tuva, back in 1944.