A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘siberia

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • D-Brief notes that global climate change seems already to have altered the flow of the ocean current system including the Gulf Stream.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the dialect, and cultural forms, of American loggers.
  • Taika Waititi, director of (among other movies) Thor: Ragnarok, has created controversy by talking about racism in his native New Zealand. (Good for him, I’d say.) Lawyers, Guns and Money reports.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at a strange public apology by a Chinese company, and what this says about Chinese politics.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shared this map depicting the many ephemeral states that appeared in the former Russian Empire after the October Revolution.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that there are very good reasons to believe in dark matter and dark energy, that these concepts are not just a latter-day version of the aether.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the many ways in which the Siberian republic of Tuva is a political anomaly in Russia.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley uses data from the National Graduates Survey to take a look at student regret in Canadian universities. To what extent does it exist? What disciplines is it concentrated in?
Advertisements

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Montréal, Wayne, Sydney, Istanbul, Irkutsk

leave a comment »

  • Controversy continues over the construction of a commuter rail link in Montréal’s West Island. Global News reports.
  • The New Jersey town of Wayne is going to have to adjust to an economy without Toys R Us, based there. Bloomberg reports.
  • Property prices have fallen in Sydney for the seventh month in a row, those prices outside Sydney are rising. Bloomberg reports.
  • Plans to construct a new shipping canal through the Bosphorus, at Istanbul, may have negative effects for the strait and the city. National Geographic reports.
  • The Guardian takes a look at the Siberian city of Irkutsk, a metropolis that apparently can lay claim to a long tradition of cultural and other dissent, here.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

leave a comment »

  • Anthropology.net shares in the debunking of the Toba catastrophe theory.
  • Architectuul features Mirena Dunu’s exploration of the architecture of the Black Sea coastal resorts of Romania, built under Communism.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of sleep hygiene and of being well-rested.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the filaments of Orion, indicators of starbirth.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how solar sails and the Falcon Heavy can be used to expedite the exploration of the solar system.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of debris marking the massive flood that most recently refilled the Mediterranean on the seafloor near Malta.
  • Lucy Ferriss at Lingua Franca uses a recent sickbed experience in Paris to explore the genesis of Bemelmans’ Madeline.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money noted recently the 15th anniversary of the American invasion of Iraq, trigger of a world-historical catastrophe.
  • The LRB Blog hosts Sara Roy’s defense of UNRWA and of the definition of the Palestinians under its case as refugees.
  • The NYR Daily notes how the regnant conservative government in Israel has been limiting funding to cultural creators who dissent from the nationalist line.
  • Roads and Kingdoms uses seven food dishes to explore the history of Malta.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, even though dark matter is likely present in our solar system, we have not detected signs of it.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the field of machine learning, and notes the ways in which its basic epistemology might be flawed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the dropping of the ethnonym “Mongol” from the title of the former Buryat-Mongol autonomous republic sixty years ago still makes some Buryats unhappy.

[PHOTO] Three photos of two meteorites at the AMNH (@amnh)

Ahnighito, a fragment of the massive Cape York meteorite that itself masses 31 tons, is immense. The fact that the museum was able to transfer this fragment from its Greenland home to here is itself an achievement. The displayed fragment of the similar Sikhote-Alin meteorite, which impacted the Russian Maritime Territory in 1947 is smaller, but the fact of these fragments’ existence–shards of solid iron bodies sheared into pieces by the force of impact–is humbling. The universe is so vast.

Me and Ahnighito #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #ahnighito #ahnighitometerorite #meteorite #iron #amnh #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram #greenland

Ahnighito #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #amnh #ahnighito #ahnighitometeorite #greenland #meteorite #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram

Fragment of Sikhote-Alin #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #amnh #sikhotealin #meteorite #iron #siberia #russianfareast #primorye #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram

[ISL] Five islands notes: Caribbean and Jamaica migration, Diomedes, Indonesia, Finland

  • Lyman Stone, at In A State of Migration, takes a look at the slow population growth in even the well-off Caribbean, thanks to substantial emigration.
  • At Jamaica Observer, Edward Seaga summarizes the history of Jamaican emigration–economically necessary–and worries about the impact of Trump.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Big Diomede and Little Diomede, two islands in the Bering Strait that not only have different sovereigns (the US and Russia) but different dates, too.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at how the indigenous population of Siberut, an Indonesian island west of Sumatra, are dealing with the effects of deforestation and cultural disruption.
  • Global News reports on an entrepreneur who wants to make an island in Finland into a women-only resort.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope writes about why he reads so little science fiction these days. (Too little plausible world-building and exploration of our world, he argues.)
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait enthuses about the Falcon Heavy launch yesterday, while Lawyers, Guns and Money is much less impressed with the Falcon Heavy launch, calling it representative of the new global plutocracy.
  • The Buzz shares some of the favourite books of 2017 of staff members at the Toronto Public Library.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the recent study providing tantalizing data hinting at the potential environments of the TRAPPIST-1 planets.
  • Cody Delistraty links to an essay of his analyzing the grand strategy of Macron for France, and for Europe.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on how one man’s nostalgia for the 1990s led him to create a video rental store.
  • Gizmodo reports on how scientists made, under conditions of exceptional heat and pressure, a new kind of ice that may exist in the cores of Uranus and Neptune.
  • Hornet Stories takes pointed issue with an astonishingly tone-deaf essay that demonstrates the existence of racism in the leather community.
  • JSTOR Daily links to papers suggesting that referenda are not necessarily good for democracy.
  • Language Hat looks at the surprisingly profound roots of singing in nonsense, in different cultures and over the age of the individual.
  • The LRB Blog reports from a visit paid by one of its writers to the US embassy in London so disdained by Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that there has been a consistent slowing of gains to life expectancy in rich countries since 1950, hinting perhaps at a maximum lifespan (for now?).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the ozone hole has stopped repairing itself, quite possibly because of global warming.
  • Towleroad reports on a sort of brunch-based passing of the torch from the old five castmembers of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy to the new five.
  • Window on Eurasia shares what seems to be a fair take on the history of Jews in Siberia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Kambiz at Anthropology.net notes evidence that Neanderthals in Italy used fire to shape digging sticks 170 thousand years ago.
  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross reminds online commentators to be careful and reasonable in their speculations online, if only because these last forever.
  • D-Brief notes a new study of the TRAPPIST-1 system suggesting that its outermost planets, in the circumstellar habitable zone, are so low density that they must have abundant volatiles. Water is the most likely candidate.
  • Hornet Stories introduces readers to the impressive photography of New York City’s Peter Hujar.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox meditates on the issues of friendship in the contemporary world.
  • Joe. My. God. shares representative Tammy Duckworth’s mockery of the authoritarian Donald Trump, aka “Cadet Bone Spurs”.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the continuing importance of the films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that someone has made cute maps of seven solar system worlds for children.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an article looking at how some of the schoolgirls abducted in Nigeria by Boko Haram are doing.
  • The NYR Daily engages with “Soul of a Nation”, a touring exhibit of African-American art in the era of Black Power.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports from the scene of the impending Falcon Heavy launch, sharing photos.
  • Towleroad notes a South African church that not only beats its queer parishoners but fines them, too.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests</u. Western sanctions could hinder the Russian development of its Arctic presence.