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[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at how stellar winds from red dwarfs complicate the habitability of planets in their circumstellar habitable zones.
  • The Crux, noting the 75th anniversary of the atomic age, notes some non-nuclear weapons achievements of this era.
  • D-Brief notes the exceptional strength of prehistoric women farmers.
  • Daily JSTOR takes a look at the instantaneity and power–frightening power, even–of celebrity culture in an era where technology gives us access to the intimate details of their lives.
  • Far Outliers notes that Pearl Buck, American author and missionary in China, actually was egalitarian and feminist.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers all those texts created in the past, of importance then and relevant even now, which have been forgotten. How can the canon be restored?
  • Imageo shares photos of the eruption of Mount Agung, in Bali.
  • Language Hat notes the intense interest of Roman Italy in all things Egyptian, including hieroglyphics. Where, exactly, was the like European interest in the cultures it colonized more recently?
  • Language Log tries to find people who can identify the source language of a particular text. It seems Turkic …
  • Lingua France talks about Robert Luis Stevenson and his opinions (and the blogger’s) about the weather of Edinburgh.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes the seriously destabilizing potential of roboticization on human employment. To what extent can improving education systems help?
  • Tariq Ali at the LRB Blog talks about the latest religious-political crisis in Pakistan.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article describing a Vietnamese historian’s search for cartographic proof of his country’s claims in the South China Sea.
  • The NYR Daily considers an interesting question: how, exactly, do you get an actor to act naturally for film? What strategies do filmmakers use?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes a new genetic study hinting at a much greater survival of indigenous populations–women, at least–in Argentina than was previously suspected.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an interesting effort to try to preserve and restore the older districts of Kabul.
  • Seriously Science notes the exploration of the microbial life populating the coffee machine sludge of some inquisitive scientists.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that substantially Russian-populated northern Kazakhstan is at risk of becoming a new Russian target, especially after Nazarbayev goes.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some thoughts on people of colour and the LGBTQ rainbow flag.
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[NEWS] Five links: American gun owners, Japanese inequality, Polish politics, Lexit, #elsagate

  • The small minority of American gun owners who own huge numbers of guns, more than they could seemingly use, is the subject of this study at The Guardian.
  • The Japanese economy may be growing, but so is inequality, Bloomberg reports.
  • This Open Democracy examination of the sharpening political divides in Poland, particularly outside of Warsaw, is gripping. It starts with the self-immolation of Upper Silesian Piotr Szczęsny in his country’s capital.
  • Julian Savarer takes a look at the many problems with “Lexit”, the idea of a left-wing argument for Brexit.
  • James Bridle looks at the complex human and artificial mechanisms behind the production of so much wrong children’s video content. #elsagate is only the tip of it all. Medium hosts the article.

[NEWS] Four notes about new journalisms, media: Torontoist. non-profit journalism, online serials

  • Simon Bredin, editor of the Torontoist that is last survivor of the Gothamist network, calls for more support as the website moves forward.
  • DeSmog Canada’s Emma Gilchrist argues, looking at models around the world, that non-profit journalism can work.
  • David Beers at the National Observer argues that British Columbia has built up a cluster of strong digital journalism outlets.
  • Adam Minter looks at the emergence and success of online serials as a profitable form of fiction in China, over at Bloomberg.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 13, 2017 at 6:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that our first confirmed extrasolar visitor has been named, I/U2017 U1.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the dynamics allowing Enceladus to keep its subsurface water ocean.
  • Crooked Timber reacts to the alarming rift opening up between Saudi Arabia and its Shi’ite neighbours, including Lebanon and Iran.
  • D-Brief notes that the New Horizons team planners are seeking a new name for their next target, (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at some of the greeting cards designed for American Greetings by Robert Crumb.
  • Hornet Stories notes the rise of explicitly homophobic and transphobic ideologues in Paraguay, and its implications for wider South America.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes growing Democratic strength in Washington State.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a New York Times map of the Virginia election for governor.
  • The NYR Daily looks how the brutally quick shutdown of DNAInfo and the Gothamist network reflects the generally parlous state of journalism (among other things).
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the humble momo, a breakfast food in (among other places) Bhutan.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why quark fusion can never be a potent energy source.
  • Understanding Society celebrates its tenth anniversary.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the disinterest of most Russians in personally costly revolutionary actions.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes an extended look at sexual harassment in anthropology, drawing from #metoo.
  • Crooked Timber considers the so-called Amazon-Facebook-Google “trinet” set to take over from the free Internet.
  • Dead Things considers if the Americas could have been populated by early migration down the coast, the “kelp route”.
  • Samuel Hatmaker’s Lego portrait of RuPaul is profiled in Hornet Stories.
  • Language Hat considers an untranslatable poem of Pasternak.
  • Language Log notes how Manafort’s legal team confused “Cyprus” with “cypress”.
  • Robert Farley of Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview of his with the Indian consul-general in Houston on the nature of the latter’s work.
  • Tyler Cowen of Marginal Revolution argues blaming Facebook for electoral manipulation overlooks the responsibility of individual voters.
  • The NYR Daily notes that the Kurds have paid the price for Trump’s dealings with Iran.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the surprisingly living Central Cemetery of Vienna.
  • Drew Rowsome explores the literature of horror writer Robert Sherman.
  • Towleroad notes BPM, the Oscar-contending French film about the AIDS crisis in that country.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the oddness of a pledge by China to fight illegal migration by Chinese into Russia.

[NEWS] Four science and technology links: Internet, Neanderthals, dinosaurs, global warming

  • André Staltz argues the triumvirate of Google, Facebook, and Amazon is ending the free Internet.
  • Sarah Kaplan notes research suggesting Neanderthals were outmatched not by human capabilities so much as by numbers.
  • VICE notes a study looking at exactly how, 65 million years ago, triggered a mass extinction ending the dinosaurs.
  • Heat records for summers around the world are set to be shattered, thanks to global warming.

[NEWS] Four science and technology links: Quayside, Wattpad, disasters, transhumanism

  • We’ve got more data on the impending Google investments in the emergent Toronto neighbourhood of Quayside. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Tencent has just invested $C 40 million in Toronto online fiction startup Wattpad. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Canadian cities are starting to integrate nature into their defense planning against natural disasters. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Tim Adams visits a transhumanist fair in Texas and considers what the future bodes for the modification of humanity. HIs article is in the Observer.