A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘social networking

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: D-Day, pot shops, YouTube, Toronto Dance Theatre, Crossways

  • Jamie Bradburn looks at how, 75 years ago, the media of Toronto responded to D-Day.
  • Illegal marijuana shops in Toronto are being literally closed to the public, by the city putting large concrete blocks in their front doorways. blogTO reports.
  • YouTube shutting down its space for creators in Toronto is not good news for aspiring local video stars. blogTO reports.
  • Christopher House, long-time director of the Toronto Dance Theatre, is leaving his position. NOW Toronto reports.
  • Amy Carlberg writes at blogTO about how the Crossways, the giant brutalist apartment towers at Dundas and Bloor, are becoming trendy, with a line of merchandise and the hashtag #crosswayswednesdays on Instagram.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the first time that an exoplanet, HR 8799e, has been directly observed using optical interferometry.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the possibility, demonstrated by the glimpsing of a circumplanetary disc around exoplanet PDS 70b, that we might be seeing a moon system in formation.
  • The Citizen Science Salon looks what observers in Antarctica are contributing to our wealth of scientific knowledge.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to articles looking at the latest findings on the Precambrian Earth.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas writes about his ambivalent response to a Twitter that, by its popularity, undermines the open web.
  • Gizmodo notes that NASA is going to open up the International Space Station to tourists.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how croquet, upon its introduction in the 19th century United States, was seen as scandalous for the way it allowed men and women to mix freely.
  • Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the unaccountable fondness of at least two Maine Republican legislators for the Confederacy.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the economic success of Israel in recent decades is a triumph of neoliberalism.
  • Stephen Ellis at the NYR Daily writes about the gymnastics of Willem de Kooning.
  • Drew Rowsome profiles out comic Brendan D’Souza.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the still strange galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, apparently devoid of dark matter.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever shares his theory about a fixed quantity of flavor in strawberries of different sizes.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a contentious plan for a territorial swap between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul looks at some architecturally innovative pools.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Wolf 359, a star made famous in Star Trek for the Starfleet battle there against the Borg but also a noteworthy red dwarf star in its own right.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how the NASA Deep Space Atomic Clock will play a vital role in interplanetary navigation.
  • The Crux considers the “drunken monkey” thesis, the idea that drinking alcohol might have been an evolutionary asset for early hominids.
  • D-Brief reports on what may be the next step for genetic engineering beyond CRISPR.
  • Bruce Dorminey looks at how artificial intelligence may play a key role in searching for threat asteroids.
  • The Island Review shares some poetry from Roseanne Watt, inspired by the Shetlands and using its dialect.
  • Livia Gershon writes at JSTOR Daily about how YouTube, by promising to make work fun, actually also makes fun work in psychologically problematic ways.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how the relatively small Taiwan has become a financial superpower.
  • Janine di Giovanni at the NYR Daily looks back at the 2000 intervention in Sierra Leone. Why did it work?
  • Jamais Cascio at Open the Future looks back at a 2004 futurological exercise, the rather accurate Participatory Panopticon. What did he anticipate correctly? How? What does it suggest for us now to our world?
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that LightSail 2 will launch before the end of June.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how the discovery of gas between galaxies helps solve a dark matter question.
  • Strange Company shares a broad collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia makes the obvious observation that the West prefers a North Caucasus controlled by Russia to one controlled by Islamists.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at American diner culture, including American Chinese food.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Koreans, Italians, Irish, Albino Carreira, #threetorontos

  • This 2013 Toronto Guardian article explains how the Korean community in Toronto can trace its origins to early 20th century missionaries from Canada.
  • At Spacing, Daniel Panneton writes about the rise of fascism in Italian Toronto and the very different reactions to this ideology’s rise.
  • CBC Toronto reports on the popular new app Irish App-roved, aimed at helping new immigrants from Ireland get oriented in Toronto.
  • Jacob Lorinc at the Toronto Star tells the story of Albino Carreira, a Portuguese-Canadian construction worker disabled by a construction incident in the 1990s who went on to whimsically decorate his Clinton Street home and his bug-covered van.
  • The growing racialization of poverty in Toronto is a huge ongoing concern. The Toronto Star reports.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Matt Thompson at anthro{dendum} writes about the complex, often anthropological, satire in the comics of Charles Addams.
  • Architectuul looks at the photography of Roberto Conte.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes a new computer model suggesting a supernova can be triggered by throwing a white dwarf into close orbit of a black hole.
  • D-Brief notes how ammonia on the surface of Pluto hints at the existence of a subsurface ocean.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how the bombardment of Earth by debris from a nearby supernova might have prompted early hominids to become bipedal.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that NASA has awarded its first contract for its plans in lunar space.
  • Far Outliers notes the reactions, within and without the Soviet Union, to the 1991 Soviet coup attempt.
  • Matt Novak at Gizmodo’s Paleofuture notes how, in 1995, Terry Pratchett predicted the rise of online Nazis.
  • io9 notes the impending physical release this summer of DVDs of the Deep Space Nine documentary What We Left Behind.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests some ways to start gardening in your apartment.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log claims that learning Literary Chinese is a uniquely difficult experience. Thoughts?
  • The NYR Daily features a wide-ranging interview with EU official Michel Barnier focused particularly, but not exclusively, on Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that an Internet vote has produced a majority in favour of naming outer system body 2007 OR10 Gonggang.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the possibility that foreign investors in Mexico might be at risk, at least feel themselves at risk, from the government of AMLO.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress archives spreadsheets.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal looks at magenta spreen, a colourful green that he grows in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how we on Earth are carelessly wasting irreplaceable helium.
  • Window on Eurasia refers to reports claiming that a third of the population of Turkmenistan has fled that Central Asian state. Could this be accurate?

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams reports on how dataset mining of K2 data revealed 18 more Earth-sized planets.
  • Crooked Timber speculates on how Clarence Thomas might rule on abortion given his public rulings.
  • D-Brief observes that some corals in Hawaii appear to thrive in acidic waters. Is there hope yet for coral reefs?
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about how sociology and history overlap, in their subjects and in their methods.
  • Far Outliers examines how the last remnants of Soviet power faded quickly around the world in 1991.
  • Gizmodo looks at how an image of a rare albino panda has just been captured.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how Christian fundamentalists want to make the east of Washington State into a 51st state run by Biblical law.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how trees can minimize algae blooms in nearby water systems.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log takes issue with problematic pop psychology regarding bilingualism in Singapore.
  • Lawyers, Guns, and Money takes issue with trying to minimize court decisions like (for instance) a hypothetical overthrow of Miranda v. Arizona. (Roe v. Wade is what they are concerned with.)
  • The NYR Daily looks at the short storied life of avant-garde filmmaker Barbara Rubin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why we can never learn everything about our universe.
  • Towleroad notes that downloads of the relationship app Hinge have surged after Pete Buttigieg said he met his now-husband there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Ukraine is seeking to have the Kerch Strait separating Crimea from adjacent Russia declared an international body of water.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at what famed gay writer John Rechy is doing these days.

[NEWS] Ten links about politics and culture and the future

  • The Conversation looks at how the past religious homogeneity of Québec influences contemporary secularism.
  • Scott Gilmore at MacLean’s writes, correctly, about how Canadians in different provinces are deeply disconnected from each other.
  • Shannon Proudfoot writes at MacLean’s about how physicist Philippe J. Fournier ended up developing a second career as a predictor of Canadian elections.
  • Are legal battles between different levels of Canadian government the new normal? CBC considers.
  • The Conversation notes that most rural areas in the United States are bound to decline for structural reasons.
  • This Guardian article looks at how a high-profile gang rape in Spain helped drive the growth of the far-right Vox Party via anti-feminism and misogyny.
  • Jezebel looks at the foolish and shortsighted alliance between transphobic feminists and right-wing groups.
  • Buzzfeed shares the story of how former alt-right activist Katie McHugh is trying to rebuild her life, and her plea to her fellows to leave before they get sucked in.
  • Paul Salvatori writes at NOW Toronto about how the algorithms of major social networking platforms suck people into becoming consumers of inflammatory content.
  • Maggie Hennefeld at Open Democracy considers if “clownish outsiders” are going to be the leaders of the democracies of the future.