A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘south africa

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthro{dendum} features an essay examining trauma and resiliency as encountered in ethnographic fieldwork.
  • Architectuul highlights a new project seeking to promote historic churches built in the United Kingdom in the 20th century.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait examines Ahuna Mons, a muddy and icy volcano on Ceres, and looks at the nebula Westerhout 40.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the recent mass release of data from a SETI project, and notes the discovery of two vaguely Earth-like worlds orbiting the very dim Teegarden’s Star, just 12 light-years away.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes that having universities as a safe space for trans people does not infringe upon academic freedom.
  • The Crux looks at the phenomenon of microsleep.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the Milky Way Galaxy was warped a billion years ago by a collision with dark matter-heavy dwarf galaxy Antlia 2, and notes a robotic fish powered by a blood analogue.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that India plans on building its own space station.
  • Earther notes the recording of the song of the endangered North Pacific right whale.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the role of emotional labour in leisure activities.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Japan prepared for the Battle of the Leyte Gulf in 1944.
  • Gizmodo looks at astronomers’ analysis of B14-65666, an ancient galactic collision thirteen billion light-years away, and notes that the European Space Agency has a planned comet interception mission.
  • io9 notes how the plan for Star Trek in the near future is to not only have more Star Trek, but to have many different kinds of Star Trek for different audiences.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the observation of Pete Buttigieg that the US has probably already had a gay president.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the many ways in which the rhetoric of Celtic identity has been used, and notes that the archerfish uses water ejected from its eyes to hunt.
  • Language Hat looks at why Chinese is such a hard language to learn for second-language learners, and looks at the Suso monastery in Spain, which played a key role in the coalescence of the Spanish language.
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of katakana.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the death of deposed Egypt president Mohammed Morsi looks like a slow-motion assassination, and notes collapse of industrial jobs in the Ohio town of Lordstown, as indicative of broader trends.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the death of Mohamed Morsi.
  • The Map Rom Blog shares a new British Antarctic Survey map of Greenland and the European Arctic.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how non-religious people are becoming much more common in the Middle East, and makes the point that the laying of cable for the transatlantic telegraph is noteworthy technologically.
  • Noah Smith at Noahpionion takes the idea of the Middle East going through its own version of the Thirty Years War seriously. What does this imply?
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at a Lebanon balanced somehow on the edge, and looks at the concentration camp system of the United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains what people should expect from LightSail 2, noting that the LightSail 2 has launched.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw points readers to his stories on Australian spy Harry Freame.
  • Rocky Planet explains, in the year of the Apollo 50th anniversary, why the Moon matters.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews, and praises, South African film Kanarie, a gay romp in the apartheid era.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper examining the relationship between childcare and fertility in Belgium, and looks at the nature of statistical data from Turkmenistan.
  • The Strange Maps Blog shares a map highlighting different famous people in the United States.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why different galaxies have different amounts of dark matter, and shares proof that the Apollo moon landings actually did happen.
  • Towleroad notes the new evidence that poppers, in fact, are not addictive.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the parlous state of the Volga River.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes an extended look at the mid-20th century gay poet Frank O’Hara.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Larry Claes at Centauri Dreams considers the issues of the alien featuring in the title of the classic The Thing, facing human persecution.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber starts a debate about past blogging and conventional wisdom.
  • The Crux reports on a mass rescue of orphaned flamingo chicks in South Africa.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that asteroids provided perhaps half of the Earth’s current supply of water.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at how the far-right in Germany is appropriating artworks to support its view of history.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China may be hoping to build a base at the Moon’s south pole by 2029.
  • Far Outliers reports on the 1865 collapse of the Confederacy.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers have identified the approximate location of a kilonova that seeded the nascent solar system with heavy elements.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the news from yet another study demonstrating that HIV cannot be transmitted by HIV-undetectable people. U=U.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, via Herb Caen, the Beat Generation became known as Beatniks.
  • Language Hat shares and comments upon a passage from Dostoevsky noting how an obscenity can be stretched out into an entire conversation.
  • Language Log considers a peculiarity of the Beijing dialect.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how statehood has been used to game the American political system.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that countries with greater levels of gender inequality are more likely to produce female chess grandmasters.
  • Justin Petrone at North!, considering the history of writers in Estonia, considers what the mission of the writer should be.
  • The NYR Daily examines the black people once miners in the Kentucky town of Lynch, remembering and sharing their experiences.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers what he has learned from a recent research and writing contract.
  • Jason C. Davis at the Planetary Society Blog reports in greater detail on the crater Hayabusa 2 made in asteroid Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how the Event Horizon Telescope acts like a mirror.
  • Strange Company shares an impressively diverse collection of links.
  • Towleroad talks with writer Tim Murphy about his new novel, Correspondents.
  • Window on Eurasia considers future directions for Ukrainian language policy.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the artistic riches horded by the Nazis in the Bavarian castle of Neuschwanstein.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the possible discovery of Proxima Centauri c.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a second circumbinary planet in the Kepler-47 system.
  • Far Outliers notes the Union reaction to the civil war battle of Shiloh.
  • Mark Graham shares a link to an article abstract examining the impact of call centres on social upgrading in South Africa.
  • io9 notes plans for closer integration between the movie and television properties of the MCU.
  • JSTOR Daily explains how Florida got its name.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the similarities between the Notre Dame fire and the destruction of the National Museum of Brazil last year.
  • The LRB Blog notes the appeal of Gothic architecture.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that, in the United States, negative effects of the China Shock had concluded a decade ago.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Trump’s agitprop.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews actor Nathaniel Bacon on the occasion of his appearance in a new Sky Gilbert show.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a map of light pollution on PEI.
  • Starts With A Bang shares a plan for reducing light pollution in a n urbanizing world.
  • Window on Eurasia complains of a creeping annexation of Belarus by Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven city links: Montréal, Camden, Derry, Rome, Cape Town, Hong Kong, Dhaka & Calcutta

  • La Presse notes that the Bixi bike-sharing service in Montréal is celebrating its 11th anniversary.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how better policing cut into crime in Camden, New Jersey.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Brexit and a hardened border will hit the Northern Ireland city of Derry.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the gang that goes around Rome at night making illegal repairs to crumbling infrastructure.
  • CityLab reports on how Cape Town is coping, one year after it nearly ran out of water.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares tips for travellers visiting Hong Kong.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the families made refugees by Partition who tried to swap homes in Dhaka and Calcutta.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes a push by astronomers to enlist help for giving trans-Neptunian object 2007-OR10 a name.
  • Centauri Dreams reflects on M87*, the supermassive black hole at the heart of M87 recently imaged, with its implications for galactic habitability.
  • Crooked Timber is right to note that Kirstjen Nielsen, architect of the cruel border policies of Trump, should not be allowed to resume a normal professional life.
  • The Crux looks at the Event Horizon Telescope Project that imaged M87*.
  • D-Brief notes that one-quarter of Japanese in their 20s and 30s have remained virgins, and explains why this might be the case.
  • Far Outliers notes the process of the writing of U.S. Grant’s acclaimed memoirs.
  • Mark Graham highlights a BBC documentary, one he contributed to, asking if artificial intelligence will kill global development.
  • Gizmodo explains why the image of black hole M87* does not look exactly like the fictional one from the scientifically-grounded Interstellar.
  • Hornet Stories explains the joys of Hawai’i in fall.
  • io9 notes that the new Deep Space Nine anniversary documentary is scheduled for a one-day theatrical release. (Will it be in Toronto?)
  • JSTOR Daily makes the point that mass enfranchisement is the best way to ensure security for all.
  • Language Hat looks at the kitabs, the books written in Afrikaans using its original Arabic script kept by Cape Malays.
  • Language Log notes, with examples, some of the uses of the words “black” and “evil” in contemporary China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that having a non-octogenarian president is a good idea.
  • Marginal Revolution shares the thoughts of Samir Varma on the new technologies–better computers, faster travel, artificial life–that may change the world in the near future.
  • The NYR Daily explores the subversive fairy tales of 19th century Frenchman Édouard Laboulaye.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the sad crash of the Beresheet probe on the surface of the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome engages with the body of work of out horror writer John Saul.
  • Peter Rukavina maps out where Islanders will be voting, and the distances they will travel, in this month’s election.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel engages with the possibility that we might be alone. What next? (Myself, I think the idea of humanity as an elder race is fascinating.)
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the sort of humour that involves ambiguous adverbs.

[AH] Five alternate history maps from r/imaginarymaps (#alternatehistory)

  • r/imaginarymaps has a map imagining that, in the 1520s, the Kalmar Union successfully established outposts on Newfoundland. What would have happened next?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines that establishment, by the late 17th century, of a collection of Japanese settler states on the Pacific coast of North America.
  • This map, tying into a scenario elsewhere, imagines a southern Africa largely colonized by the mid-18th century by an Iberian empire.
  • What would a Britain successfully conquered by Napoleon look like? This map offers one idea.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a fictional city of a half-million people, Ramsay, at the location of St. Catharines in Niagara.

[AH] Five r/imaginarymaps maps: Panama, Greece, South Africa, US, Europe

  • This map at r/imaginarymaps imagines what might have been had the unlikely Scottish colonial project in Panama, the Darien Scheme, had succeeded.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines an Islamic Greece.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a revisionist Afrikaner state in eastern South Africa.
  • What organized crime networks might have sprung up in an independent Confederacy? This r/imaginarymaps post considers.
  • The organization of a Europe unified under Napoleonic hegemony in 1820 is laid out in this r/imaginarymaps map.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 19, 2019 at 11:00 pm