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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘space colonies

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross takes a look at the dystopian future we’ve created for ourselves with the help of Big Data.
  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology net notes the discovery of an Ancient Beringian population involved in the peopling of the Americas.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the awesome possibility of life on pulsar planets, i.e. on planets that survived or were made by a supernova.
  • Centauri Dreams suggests that dust, not ET artifacts, may explain the odd light coming from KIC 8462852, aka Boyajian’s Star.
  • Crooked Timber considers the surprisingly mixed emotions of unions regarding the idea of a guaranteed minimum income.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at the diverse non-German soldiers serving in occupied France in the Second World War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers parallels between the mentality of Silicon Valley and totalitarianism.
  • Hornet Stories considers the questionable idea of a “gold star” or “platinum star” gay person. What, exactly, is being celebrated?
  • JSTOR Daily notes the gendered nature of the supermarket of mid-20th century North America.
  • Language Hat celebrates the establishment of Hakka as an official language in Taiwan, as does Language Log.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues that the previous Oregon laws against self-service gas stations helped boost employment for the vulnerable.
  • Lingua Franca considers the concept of “ghosting”, linguistically at otherwise.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining how creativity has clustered in cities in the past.
  • Out There shares the arguments of Charles Miller for infrastructure to support crewed expansion and settlement in space, starting with the Moon.
  • Peter Rukavina talks about his last visit, with his son, to the Sears store in Charlottetown.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that 2018 may be the year we finally take a picture of a black hole, Sagittarius A* in the heart of our galaxy.
  • To what extent is history probabilistic? Understanding Society considers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes controversy in Siberia over Chinese investors who come in and disregard local sensitivities and regulations.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes J0045, once thought to be a star in Andromeda and but recognized as a binary black hole a thousand times further away.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the longevity of the Voyager mission.
  • D-Brief notes that some worms can thrive in a simulacrum of Mars soil.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes an ambitious effort to try to detect a transit of Proxima Centauri b. Did the researchers pick something up?
  • Hornet Stories links to a report suggesting HIV denialism is worryingly common in parts of Russia.
  • Language Log reports on an apparently oddly bilingual Chinese/Vietnamese poster. Where did it come from?
  • The LRB Blog reports on how Tunisian Anouar Brahem fused jazz with Arabic music on his new album Blue Maqems.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a lecture by John Cloud on indigenous contributions to mapmaking in Alaska.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the grim position of Theresa May in Brexit negotiations.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers what would have happened if the Americas had not been populated in 1492. How would imperialism and settlement differ?
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes some of the architectural legacies–houses, for instance–of Basque settlement in the American West.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes three conundrums that neutrinos might be able to solve.
  • Window on Eurasia notes why Russia is hostile, despite its program of merging federal units, to the idea of uniting Tatarstan with Bashkortostan.
  • Using an interwar map of Imperial Airways routes, Alex Harrowell illustrates how the construction of globalized networks can make relatively marginal areas quite central.

[NEWS] Five sci-tech links: Mount Agung, rural Internet, Wacom, space mining school, seeding life

  • Global News considers if the Mount Agung eruption in Bali could, through the injection of dust into the atmosphere, lead to global cooling.
  • VICE examines how rural electric cooperatives in the United States are adding broadband Internet to the list of services they provide.
  • VICE profiles Wacom, the Japanese company with decades of investment in touchscreen technology now finally paying off.
  • Wired notes that the Colorado School of Mines is now offering a program for space miners.
  • Universe Today shares a speculative plan for using self-replicating robots to seed life on potentially suitable exoplanets across the galaxy, focusing on ones with natural oxygen atmospheres.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • James Bow notes, by way of explaining new fiction he is writing, why a Mercury colony makes sense.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the life of Anita Brenner, a Mexican-born American Jewish writer who helped connect the two North American neighbours.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes the cautious approach of the United States towards famine relief in the young Soviet Union in 1922.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares a brief Lewis Mumford quote, talking about how men became mechanical in spirit before they invented complex machines.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the many ways in which the movie Addams Family Values is queer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the idea of what “thoughtfulness” means in relation to Senator Al Franken.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few more fantasy map generators.
  • The NYR Daily considers the thoughtful stamp art of Vincent Sardon.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell recommends Adam Rutherford’s new book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, on genomics and history.
  • Towleroad notes that Demi Levato took trans Virginian politician Danica Roem her to the American Music Awards.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Tatar cleric’s speculation that Russia’s undermining of the Tatar language in education might push Tatars away from Russia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that interbreeding with Neanderthals restored ancient hominin DNA to homo sapiens.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at signs of planetary formation in cometary rings.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a theory that advanced extraterrestrial civilizations could manipulate pulsars as beacons.
  • Hornet Stories explains what “intersex” means.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the perhaps baffling appeal of Florida real estate at a time of climate change.
  • The LRB Blog considers the radical potential of asteroid mining. Could it help free us from resource scarcity? How should we manage it?
  • Marginal Revolution shares an argument that humans, through transporting life, are increasing biodiversity.
  • The NYR Daily argues that China has too many illusions over its “New Silk Road” initiatives.
  • Peter Rukavina examines the changing shades of green used by GO Transit.
  • Drew Rowsome really likes Toronto musical Bat Out of Hell.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how different non-Russian languages are present on the streets of St. Petersburg.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at enormous, explosive Wolf-Rayet stars, and at WR 124 in particular.
  • The Big Picture shares heart-rending photos of Rohingya refugees fleeing Burma.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the potential of near-future robotic asteroid mining.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of vast cave systems on the Moon, potential homes for settlers.
  • Hornet Stories exposes young children to Madonna’s hit songs and videos of the 1980s. She still has it.
  • Inkfish notes that a beluga raised in captivity among dolphins has picked up elements of their speech.
  • Language Hat notes a dubious claim that a stelae containing Luwian hieroglyphic script, from ancient Anatolia, has been translated.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the question of preserving brutalist buildings.
  • The LRB Blog considers how Brexit, intended to enhance British sovereignty and power, will weaken both.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that the moons and planets of the solar system have been added to Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily considers how the Burmese government is carefully creating a case for Rohingya genocide.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer concludes, regretfully, that the market for suborbital travel is just not there.
  • Visiting a shrimp festival in Louisiana, Roads and Kingdoms considers how the fisheries work with the oil industry (or not).
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent abduction in Chechnya of singer Zelimkhan Bakayev, part of the anti-gay pogrom there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that rebuilding Kaliningrad as a Russian military outpost will be expensive.

[NEWS] Four technology links: AIM, Ring of Fire Internet, robotic worms, lunar orbit stations

  • Wired mourns AIM, AOL Instant Messenger. For me as with others, it really was a life-changing technology.
  • The Ring of Fire, a mineral-rich region of northern Ontario set for development, is getting high-speed Internet. The Toronto Star reports.
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  • VICE notes that someone programmed an Arduino robot with a simulation of a worm’s brain. This is very interesting.
  • The Crux considers the potential import of an orbital Moon station for future interplanetary travel.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 7, 2017 at 9:45 pm