A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘space travel

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • Anthrodendum’s Alex Golub talks about anthropologists of the 20th century who resisted fascism.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a study suggesting the TRAPPIST-1 system might be substantially older than our own solar system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers tidal locking as a factor relevant to Earth-like planetary environments.
  • The Crux shows efforts to help the piping plover in its home on the dunes of the Great Lakes coast of Pennsylvania.
  • Dead Things considers the evidence for the presence of modern humans in Sumatra 73 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the case for placing a lunar base not on the poles, but rather in the material-rich nearside highlands.
  • Far Outliers shares some evocative placenames from Japan, like Togakushi (‘door-hiding’) from ninja training spaces.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptionally stylistically uneven Spanish translation of the Harry Potter series.
  • Language Log thinks, among other things, modern technologies make language learning easier than ever before.
  • The LRB Blog notes how claims to trace modern Greece directly to the Mycenaean era are used to justify ultranationalism.
  • Marginal Revolution considers which countries are surrounded by enemies. (India rates poorly by this metric.)
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker considers how Confederate statues are products of recycling, like so much in our lives.
  • The NYR Daily considers the unique importance of Thomas Jefferson, a man at once statesman and slaver.
  • The Planetary Society Blog celebrated the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 2 Sunday.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, for a country fighting a drug war, Mexico spends astonishingly little on its police force.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at classic John Wayne Western, The Train Robbers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the critical role of NASA’s Planetary Protection Officer.
  • Strange Company notes the many legends surrounding the early 19th century US’ Theodosia Burr.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts Ilya Somin’ argument against world government, as something limiting of freedom. Thoughts?
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Ukrainians are turning from Russia, becoming more foreign to their one-time partner.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the pleasures of the unmediated life, experienced in her recent vacation.
  • This celebration at Centauri Dreams of the forty years of science from the Voyager missions is heart-warming.
  • White racism in power is touched upon at Lawyers, Guns and Money.
  • Noel Maurer notes that the Philippines, where indiscriminate violence is state policy, no longer counts as a true democracy. Duturte as Marcos?
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map depicting the frequency with which young adults live with parents across Europe. Northwestern Europe stands out.
  • Understanding Society looks at an early critique of positivism in sociology.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Belarus’ preparation for the Zapad 2017 military exercises with Russia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

leave a comment »

  • The Citizen Science Blog notes an effort to undertake a census of the monarch butterfly this week.
  • Crooked Timber’s Eric Rauchway riffs on Nolan’s Dunkirk as a meditation on the end of empire.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that, though a good idea science-wise, interstellar probes are not coming anytime soon.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog shares 13 lessons to be taken from 13 Reasons Why.
  • Language Hat investigates the deeper etymology of “Lozi”, a people of Zambia.
  • Victor Mair of Language Log takes a critical look at the difficulty of learning Chinese characters.
  • Turning to the taxi industry, Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the extent to which the gig economy undermines immigrant and minority participation in established industries.
  • The LRB Blog wonders what Brexiteers could possibly have, rightly, against the European Court of Justice. Law matters …
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is disconcerted by the extent to which some people believe falsehoods about crime and race in the US.
  • Transit Toronto notes last night’s Underground Freedom Train Ride. I’m sad I missed this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Belarus’ concern over the import of upcoming joint military exercises with Russia, here and here.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

leave a comment »

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of Jupiter and its moons taken from the Earth.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the life lessons she has taken from her recent extended trip in Europe.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the testing, by a European team, of the InflateSail intended to remove debris from Earth orbit.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at the historically messy interactions between democratic governance and economic policy.
  • Dangerous Minds notes that Trump is making use of LGBT people as pawns. I wish the conclusion was less frighteningly convincing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper on a recent search for exomoons, including the possible detection of Kepler 1625b I.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers what it means for a parent to look at their child in an era of technologically mediated vision.
  • In Medias Res’ Russell Arben Fox notes, from his personal experience, how Donald Trump just does not get scouting.
  • Language Log shares a report of how a Chinese man with synesthesia sees written language.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Isaiah Berlin predicted the Saudi-American alliance back in 1945.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent decline in regional income convergence in the United States. Causes?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the politics that went into costly subway design changes in Mexico City. (Line 12 does look nice.)
  • Strange Company notes the romance of the grave of the Mysterious Stranger in Alexandria, Virginia. Who was she?
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Jinks Monsoon will be voicing a Steven Universe character and is out as non-gendered.
  • Window on Eurasia notes growing controversy in Kyrgyzstan over a switch in Kyrgyz alphabets from Cyrillic to Latin.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the challenges and the prospects of laser SETI.
  • Citizen Science Salon reports on a couple who have done their best to keep their bee numbers up.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Milo’s book, contrary to Milo’s claims, has performed very badly indeed in the UK, among other places.
  • Language Log features a poetic digression by Victor Mair on Chinese characters for words like “plum” and “wine.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that moderate Republicans in Congress might not be all that.
  • The LRB Blog considers Nice at, and after, the time of last year’s terrorist attacks.
  • Marginal Revolution features Tyler Cowen’s description of his writing processes.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Toronto gay photographer Dylan Rosser.
  • Unicorn Booty looks back at the history of the queercore movement–gay punk, as a first approximation.
  • Vintage Space links to an article explaining why there was neither an Apollo 2 nor an Apollo 3.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian state is undermining various once-allied Russian nationalist movements.

[NEWS] Five notes about Canada, from GG Julie Payette to lobster sent to China to Syrians in Ontario

  • Paul Wells reports on the process leading up to the selection of astronaut Julie Payette as Governor-General.
  • At MacLean’s, Scott Gilmore notes that the reluctance of the Conservative Party of Canada to embrace gay people is a big problem.
  • VICE notes that the lobster of Atlantic Canada has become a prominent feature of Canada’s trade with China.
  • Toronto Life shares photos from a four-day vacation of a Syrian refugee family that took them across Ontario.
  • CBC notes that the tourism sector in Jasper is wanting for workers, because of low wages and a high cost of living.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The anthropology group blog Savage Minds now has a new name, Anthrodendum.
  • Anthropology.net reports on the first major study of ancient African human DNA. New history is revealed.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on how gravitational lensing led to the identification of a single star nine billion light-years away. (This is a record.)
  • Centauri Dreams reports the possible detection of a debris disk around pulsar Geminga, augury of future planets perhaps?
  • Dangerous Minds reports on Seoul’s Haesindang Park, a park literally full of penises–phallic symbols, at least.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes one analysis arguing for the plausibility of unmanned probes using imaginable technology reaching the ten nearest stars in a century.
  • Imageo shares photos from space of the southern California wildfires.
  • Language Hat shares some stirring poetry in Scots.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the scale of child labour in North Carolina’s farm sector.
  • Marginal Revolution thinks that American observers of Putin think, far too much, that he actually has a plan. The degree of chaos in Russia’s affairs is apparently being underestimated.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the unsettling rural Americana of photographer Gregory Crewdson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Zhirinovsky’s plan for a sweeping Russian annexation of Ukraine, leaving only the northwest independent.