A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘space travel

[NEWS] Four technology links: AIM, Ring of Fire Internet, robotic worms, lunar orbit stations

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  • Wired mourns AIM, AOL Instant Messenger. For me as with others, it really was a life-changing technology.
  • The Ring of Fire, a mineral-rich region of northern Ontario set for development, is getting high-speed Internet. The Toronto Star reports.
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  • VICE notes that someone programmed an Arduino robot with a simulation of a worm’s brain. This is very interesting.
  • The Crux considers the potential import of an orbital Moon station for future interplanetary travel.
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Written by Randy McDonald

October 7, 2017 at 9:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a team of students who caught footage of the August solar eclipse from a high-altitude balloon.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that the early Moon apparently had a very thin atmosphere for tens of millions of years.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to Elon Musk’s descriptions of his space ambitions.
  • Hornet Stories notes that many on the alt-right are upset that game Wolfenstein is all about shooting Nazis.
  • The LRB Blog notes the almost ridiculous irony of Conservative Theresa May wearing a bracelet with the image of radical leftist Frida Kahlo.
  • Russell Darnley looks at efforts to get Singapore restaurants to shift away from using environmentally damaging palm oil.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the overwhelming power of the NRA in the modern United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers ways we can do SETI better by having a less Eurocentric understanding of our own history.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Uzbekistan and Kyrgzystan could solve border issues through swapping enclaves.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the corrosive effect of Bannon, and journalistic culture generally, on politics.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes that the most plausible explanation for Tabitha’s Star, KIC 8462852, exists in partial eclipses of the star by dust clouds.
  • D-Brief notes that the giant stick insects of Lord Howe Island did survive in their forced diaspora.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze takes a look at Kelt-9b, a planet so close to its star that it is literally melting away.
  • Language Hat looks at a website set up by inhabitants of the Faroe Islands to translate Faroese.
  • The LRB Blog shares some of the past appearances of Nobel-winning author Kazuo Ishiguro in the pages of the LRB.
  • Neal Ascherson at the NYR Daily looks at the mechanism of the referendum, in Scotland and Catalonia and elsewhere.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the import of Mike Pence’s promise to send Americans to the Moon again.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how the cosmic phenomenon of inflation explains the entire modern universe.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Chechnya’s Ramzan Kadyrov is trying to establish himself as a Russian political figure.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross bets that barring catastrophe, the US under Trump will dispatch crewed circumlunar flights.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the evolution of birds, through speculation on how the beak formed.
  • Language Log looks at the ways Trump is represented, and mocked, in the languages of East Asia.
  • Noting the death toll in a Mexico City sweatshop, Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that sweatshops are dangerous places to work.
  • The NYR Daily notes the many structural issues likely to prevent foreign-imposed fixes in Afghanistan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from a seemingly unlikely date festival held in the depths of the Saudi desert.
  • Rocky Planet reports that Mount Agung, a volcano in Indonesia, is at risk of imminent eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a new stage adaptation in Toronto of the Hitchcock classic, North by Northwest.
  • Strange Company reports on how the Lonergans disappeared in 1998 in a dive off the Great Barrier Reef. What happened to them?
  • Towleroad notes how Chelsea Manning was just banned from entering Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia claims that the Russian language is disappearing from Armenia.
  • Arnold Zwicky maps the usage of “faggot” as an obscenity in the United States.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that asteroid 2006 VW139 is not just also a comet but a binary object, too, while Centauri Dreams also reports on 288P. (Multiple names, here.)
  • D-Brief reports on a study intended to answer the question of whether or not our galaxy is normal.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper suggesting TRAPPIST-1 might provide a threatening environment for its planets, links to another simulatingthe environments of TRAPPIST-1 planets to find d most likely to be Earth-like, and links to another finding that panspermia between the different planets of TRAPPIST-1 would be quite easy.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Douglas Merrill notes one study of AfD voters finding former non-voters contributed most to its vote surge.
  • Hornet Stories notes an anti-gay “Straight Lives Matter” gathering in Australia that got only 30 protesters.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a crowdsourced map showing earthquake damage in Mexico.
  • The New APPS Blog considers Foucault and Marx and their thinking about spare time, and its reduction to capital.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the recent German election and the rise of the AfD.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a proposal for a solar sail deployment on the new Deep Space Gateway station.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel has a fairly critical, but I think ultimately hopeful, review of the first episodes of Star Trek: Discovery.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that the latest Trump travel ban has many of the same fatal flaws as the others.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the Instagram account “Boys With Plants.”

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Centauri Dreams links to archival video painstakingly collected from the Voyager missions.
  • Citizen Science Salon notes ways ordinary people can use satellite imagery for archaeological purposes.
  • Good news: Asian carp can’t find a fin-hold in Lake Michigan. Bad news: The lake is so food-deprived nothing lives there. The Crux reports.
  • D-Brief notes that, once every second, a fast radio burst occurs somewhere in the universe.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the psychedelic retro-futurism of Swedish artist Kilian Eng.
  • Dead Things notes the recovery of ancient human DNA from some African sites, and what this could mean for study.
  • Cody Delistraty reconsiders the idea of the “coming of age” narrative. Does this make sense now that we have abandoned the idea of a unitary self?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the evolution of icy bodies around different post-main sequence stars.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner notes anti-Putin dissident Alexei Navalny.
  • Hornet Stories notes reports of anti-gay persecution in Azerbaijan.
  • Language Log takes a look at the dialectal variations of southern Ohio.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money starts a discussion about what effective disaster relief for Puerto Rico would look like.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the aftermath of the recent earthquake in Mexico, and the story of the buried girl who was not there.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Toronto real estate companies, in light of rent control, are switching rental units over to condos.
  • Naked Anthropologist Laura Agustín takes a look at the origins and stories of migrant sex workers.
  • The NYR Daily talks about the supposedly unthinkable idea of nuclear war in the age of Trump.
  • Drew Rowsome gives a strongly positive–and deserved review to the Minmar Gaslight show The Seat Next to the King, a Fringe triumph now playing at the Theatre Centre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how so many outer-system icy worlds have liquid water.
  • Towleroad features Jim Parsons’ exploration of how important is for him, as a gay man, to be married.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian language policy limiting minority languages in education could backfire, and wonders if Islamization one way people in an urbanizing North Caucasus are trying to remain connected to community.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.