A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘spain

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the mystery of distant active galaxy SDSS J163909+282447.1, with a supermassive black hole but few stars.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal from Robert Buckalew for craft to engage in planned panspermia, seeding life across the galaxy.
  • The Crux looks at the theremin and the life of its creator, Leon Theremin.
  • D-Brief notes that termites cannibalize their dead, for the good of the community.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at William Burroughs’ Blade Runner, an adaptation of a 1979 science fiction novel by Alan Nourse.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new study explaining how the Milky Way Galaxy, and the rest of the Local Group, was heavily influenced by its birth environment.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at why the Chernobyl control room is now open for tourists.
  • Dale Campos at Lawyers. Guns and Money looks at the effects of inequality on support for right-wing politics.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog looks at the decay and transformation of British politics, with Keith Vaz and Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper explaining why queens are more warlike than kings.
  • Omar G. Encarnación at the NYR Daily looks at how Spain has made reparations to LGBTQ people for past homophobia. Why should the United States not do the same?
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There shares his interview with physicist Sean Carroll on the reality of the Many Worlds Theory. There may be endless copies of each of us out there. (Where?)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why 5G is almost certainly safe for humans.
  • Strange Company shares a newspaper clipping reporting on a haunting in Wales’ Plas Mawr castle.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at all the different names for Africa throughout the years.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers, in the case of the disposal of eastern Oklahoma, whether federal Indian law should be textualist. (They argue against.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes the interest of the government of Ukraine in supporting Ukrainians and other minorities in Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at syntax on signs for Sloppy Joe’s.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} shares a new take on the atmosphere, as a common good.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a photo of Earth taken from a hundred million kilometres away by the OSIRIS-REx probe.
  • The Crux tells the story of how the first exoplanets were found.
  • D-Brief notes that life could be possible on a planet orbiting a supermassive black hole, assuming it could deal with the blueshifting.
  • io9 looks at the latest bold move of Archie Comics.
  • JSTOR Daily explores cleaning stations, where small fish clean larger ones.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the role China seeks to play in a remade international order.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the new upcoming national atlas of Estonia.
  • Marginal Revolution touches on the great ambition of Louis XIV for a global empire.
  • Steve Baker of The Numerati shares photos from his recent trip to Spain.
  • Anya Schiffrin at the NRY Daily explains how American journalist Varian Fry helped her family, and others, escape the Nazis.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the classic movie The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a map looking at the barriers put up by the high-income world to people moving from outside.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers the complex question of how, exactly, the density of a black hole can be measured.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever reviews Gemini Man. Was the high frame rate worth it?
  • Window on Eurasia notes the deep hostility of Tuvins towards a large Russian population in Tuva.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the existential question of self-aware cartoon characters.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul profiles architectural photographer Lorenzo Zandri, here.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes a new study suggesting red dwarf stars, by far the most common stars in the universe, have plenty of planets.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares 11 tips for interviewers, reminding me of what I did for anthropology fieldwork.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how water ice ejected from Enceladus makes the inner moons of Saturn brilliant.
  • The Crux looks at the increasingly complicated question of when the first humans reached North America.
  • D-Brief notes a new discovery suggesting the hearts of humans, unlike the hearts of other closely related primates, evolved to require endurance activities to remain healthy.
  • Dangerous Minds shares with its readers the overlooked 1969 satire Putney Swope.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that the WFIRST infrared telescope has passed its first design review.
  • Gizmodo notes how drought in Spain has revealed the megalithic Dolmen of Guadalperal for the first time in six decades.
  • io9 looks at the amazing Jonathan Hickman run on the X-Men so far, one that has established the mutants as eye-catching and deeply alien.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Pentagon has admitted that 2017 UFO videos do, in fact, depict some unidentified objects in the air.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the origin of the equestrian horseback statue in ancient Rome.
  • Language Log shares a bilingual English/German pun from Berlin.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on the legacy of Thomas Jefferson at Jefferson’s grave.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution looks at a new book arguing, contra Pinker perhaps, that the modern era is one of heightened violence.
  • The New APPS Blog seeks to reconcile the philosophy of Hobbes with that of Foucault on biopower.
  • Strange Company shares news clippings from 1970s Ohio about a pesky UFO.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the idea of shooting garbage from Earth into the sun does not work.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps explains the appearance of Brasilia on a 1920s German map: It turns out the capital was nearly realized then.
  • Towleroad notes that Pete Buttigieg has taken to avoiding reading LGBTQ media because he dislikes their criticism of his gayness.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at diners and changing menus and slavery.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Kingston, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Paris, Gibraltar, Brazzaville

  • Kingston is experiencing a serious housing crisis, exacerbated by the return of students to such educational institutions as Queen’s. Global News reports.
  • CBC looks at how, on the eve of the federal election, issues like cost of living are big even in relatively affordable Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu.
  • CityLab looks at controversy in Paris over the reconstruction of the Gare du Nord station, here.
  • Vice shares photos of Gibraltar on the eve of Brexit, here.
  • Guardian Cities shares photos of the wordless images advertising shops in the city of Brazzaville, here.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkably eccentric orbit of gas giant HR 5138b.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impact that large-scale collisions have on the evolution of planets.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber noted yesterday that babies born on September 11th in 2001 are now 18 years old, adults.
  • The Crux notes that some of the hominins in the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain, ancestors to Neanderthals, may have been murdered.
  • D-Brief reports on the cryodrakon, a pterosaur that roamed the skies above what is now Canada 77 million years ago.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the political artwork of Jan Pötter.
  • Gizmodo notes a poll suggesting a majority of Britons would support actively seeking to communicate with extraterrestrial civilizations.
  • io9 has a loving critical review of the first Star Trek movie.
  • JSTOR Daily shares, from April 1939, an essay by the anonymous head of British intelligence looking at the international context on the eve of the Second World War.
  • Language Log notes a recent essay on the mysterious Voynich manuscript, one concluding that it is almost certainly a hoax of some kind.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the future of the labour movement in the United States.
  • Marginal Revolution considers what sort of industrial policy would work for the United States.
  • Yardena Schwartz writes at NYR Daily about the potential power of Arab voters in Israel.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections explains why, despite interest, Australia did not launch a space program in the 1980s.
  • Drew Rowsome provides a queer review of It: Chapter Two.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how government censorship of science doomed the Soviet Union and could hurt the United States next.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Volga republics, recent educational policy changes have marginalized non-Russian languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a glossy, fashion photography-style, reimagining of the central relationship in the James Baldwin classic Giovanni’s Room, arranged by Hilton Als.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Fredericton, Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Riga

  • The city of Fredericton hopes a new strategy to attracting international migration to the New Brunswick capital will help its grow its population by 25 thousand. Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities notes the controversy in Amsterdam as users of moped find themselves being pushed from using bike lanes.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how many in Athens think the city might do well to unbury the rivers covered under concrete and construction in the second half of the 20th century.
  • The Sagrada Familia, after more than 130 years of construction, has finally received a permit for construction from Barcelona city authorities. Global News reports.
  • Evan Gershkovich at the Moscow Times reports on how the recent ousting of the mayor of the Latvian capital of Riga for corruption is also seem through a lens of ethnic conflict.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Kingston, Ottawa, Amsterdam, Madrid, Yerevan

  • Kingston, Ontario, is currently doing its best to cope with flood risk from the rising Lake Ontario. Global News reports.
  • MacLean’s reports on an appalling expansion of the iconic Chateau Laurier in Ottawa.
  • CityLab reports on how Amsterdam is trying to avoid being overwhelmed by tourism.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how the new government in Madrid plans to scrap a low-emissions zone because of a belief that congestion is a Madrid tradition.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares some tips for visitors to Yerevan.