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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘stephen king

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Bruce Dorminey notes that NASA plans to launch a CubeSat into lunar orbit for navigational purposes.
  • Far Outliers looks at an instance of a knight seeking to avoid battle.
  • io9 looks at how Boris Johnson ludicrously compared himself to the Hulk.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how climate change helped make civil war in Syria possible.
  • Language Hat looks at a bad etymology for “province” published by a reputable source.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the United States has had below-average economic growth since 2005. (The new average, I suppose?)
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new Stephen King novel, The Institute.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains that, with K2-18b, we did not find water on an Earth-like exoplanet.
  • Strange Company looks at a peculiar case of alleged reincarnation from mid-20th century Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, although North Caucasians marry at higher rates than the Russian average, these marriages are often not reported to officialdom.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the possible meanings, salacious and otherwise, of a “Boy Party”.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkably eccentric orbit of gas giant HR 5138b.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impact that large-scale collisions have on the evolution of planets.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber noted yesterday that babies born on September 11th in 2001 are now 18 years old, adults.
  • The Crux notes that some of the hominins in the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain, ancestors to Neanderthals, may have been murdered.
  • D-Brief reports on the cryodrakon, a pterosaur that roamed the skies above what is now Canada 77 million years ago.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the political artwork of Jan Pötter.
  • Gizmodo notes a poll suggesting a majority of Britons would support actively seeking to communicate with extraterrestrial civilizations.
  • io9 has a loving critical review of the first Star Trek movie.
  • JSTOR Daily shares, from April 1939, an essay by the anonymous head of British intelligence looking at the international context on the eve of the Second World War.
  • Language Log notes a recent essay on the mysterious Voynich manuscript, one concluding that it is almost certainly a hoax of some kind.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the future of the labour movement in the United States.
  • Marginal Revolution considers what sort of industrial policy would work for the United States.
  • Yardena Schwartz writes at NYR Daily about the potential power of Arab voters in Israel.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections explains why, despite interest, Australia did not launch a space program in the 1980s.
  • Drew Rowsome provides a queer review of It: Chapter Two.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how government censorship of science doomed the Soviet Union and could hurt the United States next.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Volga republics, recent educational policy changes have marginalized non-Russian languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a glossy, fashion photography-style, reimagining of the central relationship in the James Baldwin classic Giovanni’s Room, arranged by Hilton Als.

[CAT] Five #caturday links: names, declawing, outdoors, Washington D.C., Pet Sematery

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  • D-Brief was the first news source I noted that explained a study demonstrating that, yes, cats did recognize their names.
  • Banning the declawing of cats on account of the inhumanity of that action makes perfect sense to me. CTV News reports.
  • CityLab is perfectly correct to note that, ferociously efficient predators they are, cats should no be let out into the wild.
  • This Washington Post report of a study seeking to track the location of cat populations in the wild in Washington D.C. is fascinating, and important.
  • Cinema Blend tells of the specialization, and sensitivity, of the eight different cats used to play the cat Church in the new movie Pet Sematery.
  • [URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: Yonge Street, Scarborough Bluffs, It, Yayoi Kusama

    • I agree almost entirely with the argument of Alex Bozikovic that the time to revamp Yonge Street in North York for the future is now. The Globe and Mail has it.
    • While I have never minded the fifteen minutes’ walk through Scarborough suburbia to the Scarborough Bluffs, a dedicated TTC route to the cliffs will be nice. blogTO reports.
    • Torontoist does a nice job listing the various city locations where the recent It was filmed.
    • blogTO makes me wonder if I will ever see the Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirrors show at the AGO. Certainly I won’t if I don’t buy the tickets …

    [URBAN NOTE] Four blogTO links: Niagara Falls, Kensington Market, 450 Pape, Toronto Book Garden

    • Having visited Friday, I liked the blogTO report on the early days of Toronto’s love affair with Niagara Falls.
    • blogTO shares photos of Kensington Market in the raw 1970s.
    • The exterior of 450 Pape Avenue was used for the movie It, and the place is seeing Stephen King pilgrims already.
    • The Toronto Book Garden, a lovely mini-park at Harbourfront keyed to literary Toronto, opened yesterday.

    [BLOG] Some Thursday links

    • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
    • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
    • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
    • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
    • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
    • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
    • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
    • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
    • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
    • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

    [BLOG] Some Monday links

    • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining a potential relationship between stars’ magnetic fields and exoplanets.
    • Hornet Stories links to the Instagram account of Tom Bianchi, still taking photos of Fire Island.
    • Language Hat notes the death of Ognen Cemerski, a Macedonian who went to heroic lengths to translate Moby Dick into his language.
    • Language Log notes an unusual hybrid Sino-Tibetan sign for a restaurant.
    • Lawyers, Guns and Money is appropriately savage with Hillbilly Elegy (at least of uncritical readings of said).
    • Marginal Revolutions links to a paper noting French cities, unlike British ones, are much more tightly tied to old Roman settlements, away from the sea.
    • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw calls for the return of the Australian $2 bill.
    • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the aftermath of rampant electoral fraud in Angola. What will come next?
    • Drew Rowsome takes a stand against, particularly in the context of Stephen King’s It, the now-common fear of clowns.
    • Understanding Society takes a look at Erik Olin Wright’s thinking on possible utopias.
    • Window on Eurasia notes potential contributions of Russophone Belarusians and Ukrainians to the Russophone world, and notes some controversy in Moscow re: widely-observed Muslim holidays at start of the school year.