A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘streets

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Doug Ford, elections, Garrison Crossing, TCH smoke free, streets

  • The City Council of Toronto, out of all the cities councils in all of the cities in Ontario, was the only one targeted for such a sharp reduction in councilors. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Alexandra Flynn at Spacing reports on some legal strategies that could be brought to bear by the City of Toronto against the Doug Ford actions.
  • blogTO notes a new pedestrian crossing, the Garrison Crossing, bridging the rail lines west of Fort York.
  • The new smoke-free policy of Toronto Community Housing will also apply to marijuana smoke. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Christopher Hume considers, in an era where cars and their drivers compete with other users of our major streets, just what does make a street successful. The Toronto Star has it.

[PHOTO] The cherry blossoms of High Park

The cherry trees of High Park are in full bloom, as CBC notes, and the park yesterday was full of visitors like my father and myself taking pictures of the beauty.

The cherry blossoms of High Park (1)

The cherry blossoms of High Park (2)

The cherry blossoms of High Park (3)

The cherry blossoms of High Park (4)

The cherry blossoms of High Park (5)

The cherry blossoms of High Park (6)

The cherry blossoms of High Park (7)

The cherry blossoms of High Park (8)

Written by Randy McDonald

May 5, 2013 at 3:39 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “How does a street get a name?”

Spacing National’s Kayla-Jane Barrie has a neat post examining the street naming process in five Canadian cities: Vancouver, Edmonton, Toronto, Ottawa, and Halifax.

Who names the streets? Street naming decisions are made at the discretion of Toronto City Council. However, no street name can present a personal benefit to any City employee or official.

How does it work? The City of Toronto Honorific and Street Naming Policy govern the street naming process in Toronto. The City reviews the street name application to ensure that it complies with the law. They don’t create names or keep historical records on the backgrounds of street names (though there is book called Toronto’s Street Names by Leonard Wise and Allan Gould, published by Firefly Books). The City take names provided by applicants and processes them according to the policy. Street names must commemorate local history, honour noteworthy people associated with the city, or recognize wildlife features in the area.

Can names be changed? Names of streets that honour organizations or individuals, such as the Martin Goodman Trail, cannot be renamed. New street names will only be approved under exceptional circumstances and the historical or community significance of the current street name is considered. The City will consider naming proposals, but there is no obligation to accept or present them for consideration. All name submissions must entail a positive image, be original (to avoid confusion), and do not lend themselves to any inappropriate acronyms.

The detail on cities across Canada is fun.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 1, 2013 at 7:28 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Burgh Diaspora notes that the Chinese system of internal passports, like more informal (and sometimes unauthorized) Indian sanctions against migrants, discourages the free migration necessary for economic growth.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster observes that it might be possible to discover Earth-like planets orbiting post-main sequence white dwarfs, on account of the small size of their orbits and their stars.
  • Eastern Approaches notes that Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych seems right in thinking that he can get away with stringing the European Union on.
  • A Fistful of Euros’ Brent Whelan expects a second round of elections in Italy soon and notes that the quarter of voters choosing Beppe Grillo’s anti-establishment political group have to be taken into account.
  • Patrick Cain has an infographic showing how many of the countries of the world with the largest Roman Catholic populations are badly underrepresented in the College of Cardinals. (Italy has 21 cardinals and 50 million Catholics, while Brazil’s 133 million Catholics have only five.)
  • Torontoist and Steve Munro both note that the TTC is testing new art and display methods for its maps and bus poles.
  • Torontoist commemorates the renaming of an east-end lane street Jack Layton Way after the late NDP leader.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on anxiety among the Chuvash, a Turkic people of the middle Volga region of Russia, that their ethnic identity and their autonomous republic are both being eroded by slow assimilation.

[PHOTO] No entry here

The Annex is a maze of one-way streets and no-entry signs, as it is here opposite this just barn-like house above Christie Pits.

77560023

Written by Randy McDonald

March 15, 2012 at 4:56 am

[PHOTO] No entry here

The Annex is a maze of one-way streets and no-entry signs, as it is here opposite this just barn-like house above Christie Pits.

77560023

Written by Randy McDonald

March 15, 2012 at 12:53 am

[PHOTO] Greek on the Danforth


Greek on the Danforth
Originally uploaded by rfmcdpei

Toronto’s Greektown, located around west-central Danforth Avenue, is one of Toronto’s major ethnic enclaves and, despite the expected drift of second- and third-generation Greek-Canadians away from the area continues to be a centre of the community. The street signs in the area see Greek signs–apparently straightforward transliterations of the English–located in Hellenic white on blue below the official signs.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 18, 2009 at 3:49 pm