A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘syria

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Westerlund-1, a massive star cluster with many bright stars in our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a finding that giant planets like Jupiter are less likely to be found around Sun-like stars.
  • D-Brief notes how, in a time of climate change, birds migrated between Canada and the equator.
  • Bruce Dorminey lists five overlooked facts about the Apollo 11 mission.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that the US House of Representatives has approved the creation of a US Space Corps analogous to the Marines.
  • JSTOR Daily considers tactics to cure groupthink.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution, looking at the experience of Hong Kong, observes how closely economic freedoms depend on political freedom and legitimacy.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog explains his rationale for calculating that the Apollo project, in 2019 dollars, cost more than $US 700 billion.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the star R136a1, a star in the 30 Doradus cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud that is the most massive star known to exist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Circassians in Syria find it very difficult to seek refuge in their ancestral lands in the North Caucasus.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks, in occasionally NSFW detail, at the importance of June the 16th for him as a date.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on the massive cloud of material detected around the active galaxy Cygnus A.
  • The Crux suggests our contemporary problems with wisdom teeth represent not a failure of evolution but rather a failure on our post-Neolithic parts to eat hard foods which stimulate the jaw growth capable of supporting wisdom teeth.
  • D-Brief notes how the astronomers involved in a planetary effort to image a black hole are preparing to make an announcement next week.
  • Gizmodo notes how the debris field created in orbit by India testing an anti-satellite weapon threatens the ISS.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that at least some hotels owned by the Sultan of Brunei are deleting their social media profiles following protests over Brunei’s violent anti-gay laws.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if, between the drop in fertility that developing China was likely to undergo anyway and the continuing resentments of the Chinese, the one-child policy was worth it.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money uses a recent New York Times profile to note the sheer influence of Rupert Murdoch worldwide.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a new exhibition, at the shop of a Manhattan rare book dealer, of a collection of vintage maps of New York City from its foundation, sharing some photos, even.
  • Marginal Revolution remarks on the rapid growth of Native American numbers in the United States over the past century.
  • The NYR Daily shares a report from Debbie Bookchin in North Syria arguing that the West needs to help Rojava.
  • Roads and Kingdoms provides some tips for first-time visitors to the capital of Uruguay, Montevideo.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the continuing growth in numbers of dead from HIV infection in Russia, with Siberia being a new hotspot.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how the Event Horizon Telescope project will image a black hole’s event horizon, and what questions exist around the project.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares an Anish Kapoor map demonstrating the Brexit divides in the United Kingdom.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society considers the study of ethical disasters in capitalism, looking at OxyContin as an example.
  • Window on Eurasia notes continued threats, and continued protests to these threats, surrounding Lake Baikal in Siberia.
  • Arnold Zwicky has fun with a cartoon that plays on a pun between the words chants and chance.

[DM] Some links: longevity, real estate, migrations, the future (#demographymatters, #demographics, #population)

I have a links post up at Demography Matters.

  • Old age popped up as a topic in my feed. The Crux considered when human societies began to accumulate large numbers of aged people. Would there have been octogenarians in any Stone Age cultures, for instance? Information is Beautiful, meanwhile, shares an informative infographic analyzing the factors that go into extending one’s life expectancy.
  • Growing populations in cities, and real estate markets hostile even to established residents, are a concern of mine in Toronto. They are shared globally: The Malta Independent examined some months ago how strong growth in the labour supply and tourism, along with capital inflows, have driven up property prices in Malta. Marginal Revolution noted there are conflicts between NIMBYism, between opposing development in established neighbourhoods, and supporting open immigration policies.
  • Ethnic migrations also appeared. The Cape Breton Post shared a fascinating report about the history of the Jewish community of industrial Cape Breton, in Nova Scotia, while the Guardian of Charlottetown reports the reunification of a family of Syrian refugees on Prince Edward Island. In Eurasia, meanwhile, Window on Eurasia noted the growth of the Volga Tatar population of Moscow, something hidden by the high degree of assimilation of many of its members.
  • Looking towards the future, Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen was critical of the idea of limiting the number of children one has in a time of climate change. On a related theme, his co-blogger Alex Tabarrok highlights a new paper aiming to predict the future, one that argues that the greatest economic gains will eventually accrue to the densest populations. Established high-income regions, it warns, could lose out if they keep out migrants.

[ISL] Five #PEI links: Biovectra, Syrian refugees, Crapaud vs Kinkora, telehealth, Jed Mackay

  • The nearly forty million dollars of federal government investment promised for PEI biotech firm Biovectra is a substantial investment indeed. The Guardian reports.
  • The Guardian reports the reunification of a family of Syrian refugees on the Island.
  • Peter Rukavina notes and explains the significant differences, cultural and religious, between the neighbouring PEI communities of Crapaud and Kinkora.
  • The western PEI community of Alberton, faced with doctor shortages, has been experimenting with telehealth. The National Post explains.
  • CBC Prince Edward Island reports on Jed Mackay, an Islander currently writing for Marvel’s Daredevil.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Architectuul celebrates the life and achievements of furniture designer Florence Basset Knoll.
  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkably detailed 3d simulation of a solar flare.
  • At Crooked Timber, John Holbo engages with Corey Robin’s article in The New Yorker on the question of why people moving politically from right to left are less prominent than counterparts moving from left to right.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at the rise and the fall of the international silk trade of China, from Roman times to the 20th century.
  • At The Frailest Thing, L.M. Sacasas writes about the importance of listening to observers at the “hinges”, at the moments when things are changing.
  • Internet geographer Mark Graham links to a new chapters making the argument that cyberspace is not a novel new territory.
  • Language Log takes a look at a possible change in the representation of vocal fry as demonstrated in Doonesbury.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the background to the possible 2020 presidential bid of ex-Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Alex Tabarrok looks at a history of Aleppo that emphasizes the ancient city’s history of catastrophes.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes issue with an online map highlighting factory farmers created by pressure group Aussie Farms. How meaningful is it, for starters?
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the timetable of the introduction of syphillis to Poland-Lithuania in the 1490s.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian population prospects, noting the low fertility among the small cohort of women born in the 1990s.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts by sharing beautiful paintings and photos of tulips, and ends with a meditation on Crimean Gothic.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Queens, Fort McMurray, Casablanca, Aleppo, Baghdad

  • Guardian Cities looks at prosperous Long Island City and hard-pressed Blissville, two neighbourhoods of Queens that will be transformed by Amazon moving in.
  • CBC notes how, for Fort McMurray five years after the oil boom’s end, the bust is the new normal.
  • CityLab reports on how the Art Deco Les Abbattoirs complex in Casablanca, once an emerging artist hub, has been emptied by the city government.
  • This Middle East Eye feature looks at the relief and loss felt by returning survivors in Aleppo.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how Baghdad, fragmented and impoverished by war, is fumbling towards some sort of livability.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the arrival, and successful data collection, of New Horizons at Ultima Thule, as does Joe. My. God., as does
    Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog. Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explained, before the New Horizons flyby of Ultima Thule, why that Kuiper Belt object was so important for planetary science.
  • In advance of the New Year’s, Charlie Stross at Antipope asked his readers to let him know what good came in 2018.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber makes the argument that, in the event of a Brexit bitterly resented by many Labour supporters, the odds that they will support a post-Brexit redistributionist program that would aid predominantly pro-Brexit voters are low.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that many Earth-like worlds might be made uninhabitable over eons by the steady warming of their stars, perhaps dooming any hypothetical extraterrestrial civilizations on these planets.
  • Far Outliers looks at the patterns of early Meiji Japan relations with Korea, noting an 1873 invasion scare.
  • L.M. Sacasas writes at The Frailest Thing, inspired by the skepticism of Jacques Ellul, about a book published in 1968 containing predictions about the technological world of 2018. Motives matter.
  • Imageo looks at the evidence from probes and confirms that, yes, it does in fact snow (water) on Mars.
  • The Island Review interviews author Adam Nicolson about his family’s ownership of the Hebridean Shiant Isles. What do they mean for him, as an author and as someone experience with the sea?
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the long history of the human relationship with leather, as a pliable material for clothing of all kinds.
  • Language Hat considers the possibility that the New Year’s greeting “bistraynte”, used in Lebanon and by Christians in neighbouring countries, might come from the Latin “strenae”.
  • Language Log notes the pressure being applied against the use of Cantonese as a medium of instruction in Hong Kong.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the many reasons why a considerable number of Latinos support Donald Trump.
  • Bernard Porter at the LRB Blog comes up with an explanation as to Corbyn’s refusal to oppose Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the many problems involved with the formation of supply chains in Africa, including sheer distance.
  • The NYR Daily has a much-needed reevaluation of the Jonestown horror as not simply a mass suicide.
  • Author Peter Watts writes about a recent trip to Tel Aviv.
  • At Out There, Corey Powell writes about how planetary scientists over the decades have approached their discipline, expecting to be surprised.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shared some top images collected by Hubble in 2018.
  • Strange Company looks at the strange 1953 death of young Roman woman Wilma Montesi. How did she die, leaving her body to be found on a beach?
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Circassian refugees in Syria are asking for the same expedited status that Ukrainian refugees have received.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell takes an extended look at the politics of 4G and Huawei and the United Kingdom and transatlantic relations over the past decade.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look, in language and cartoons, at “Jesus fuck”.