A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘television

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence that pitted terrain, as found on Ceres and Vesta, indicates subsurface ice.
  • Dead Things links to evidence suggesting insomnia and poor sleep are not disorders, but rather evolutionary inheritances that were useful in the past.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the critical human role in the ongoing sixth extinction.
  • Language Hat links to speculation that the Afroasiatic language family has its origins in the Natufian Levant.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a fascinating French show about espionage, Le Bureau des l├ęgendes.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on an important speech by Malcolm Turnbull on politics and Australia’s Liberal Party.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Marc Rayman’s report on the latest discoveries of Dawn at Ceres.
  • Spacing’ Sean Ruthven has a review of a beautiful book on the Sea Ranch, a northern California estate.
  • Back in May, Septembre Anderson argued at Torontoist that rather than embracing diversity, Canadian media was more willing to wither.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument suggesting Baltic Russians would not follow the Donbas into revolt because the Baltics are much better off economically.

[NEWS] Four Canada links, from the innocence of Khadr to the joking alt-right to CanCon workings

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  • Sandy Garossino considers the furor over Omar Khadr. What if the 15 year old was actually not guilty of the crimes of which he was accused?
  • The Globe and Mail‘s Tabatha Southey points out, after the Proud Boys incident in Halifax, how the alt-right’s claims to be joking reveals their intent. Hannah Arendt knew these kinds of people.
  • The CBC’s Haydn Watters describes how one Ottawa couple is planning to visit in 2018 every location involved in every one of the 87 Heritage Minutes.
  • Ben Paynter at Fast Company writes about the system of funding and other support that keeps Canadian pop music thriving.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Language Hat blogs about appearances of Nahuatl in Los Angeles, in television and in education.
  • Language Log talks about “Zhonghua minzu”, meaning “Chinese nation” or “Chinese race” depending on the translation.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Canada, with inelastic production, might have a marijuana shortage come legalization/
  • In the NYR Daily, Christopher de Bellaigue wonders if Britain–the West, even–might be on the verge of a descent into communal violence.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the accessibility of VIA Rail’s data on trade arrivals and departures.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, in the far distant starless future, the decay of binary brown dwarf orbits can still start stars.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Dyke March.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Tatarstan’s tradition of bourgeois and intellectually critical nationalism could have wider consequences, in Russia and beyond.

[META] On the latest blogroll expansion

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Consider this post a consequence of a consolidation of my blogroll, with three posts from older blogs I’ve added previously and two new posts from new blogs.

  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross shares the strange story of five people who went missing in a winter wilderness in 1978.
  • Roads and Kingdom shares an anecdote by Alessio Perrone about a chat over a drink with a Cornishman, in a Cornwall ever more dependent on tourism.
  • Strange Company shares the story of Kiltie, a Scottish cat who immigrated to the United States in the First World War.
  • Starts With a Bang, a science blog by Ethan Siegel, argues that there is in fact no evidence for periodic mass extinctions caused by bodies external to the Earth.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, a group blog by Canadian economists, considers the value placed on Aboriginal language television programming.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • The CBC notes the consensus that the new Ontario minimum wage will not hurt the economy, overall, but provide a mild boost.
  • The Toronto Star notes that, from 2019, analog television broadcasts will start ramping down.
  • The Toronto Star notes that high prices in Ontario’s cottage country are causing the market to expand to new areas.
  • Gizmodo reports on one study suggesting that Proxima Centauri b does have the potential to support Earth-like climates.
  • Gizmodo notes one study speculating on the size of Mars’ vanished oceans.
  • Quartz reports on how one community in Alaska and one community in Louisiana are facing serious pressures from climate change and from the political reaction to said.
  • CBC notes an oil platform leaving Newfoundland for the oceans.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • D-Brief shares rare video of beaked whales on the move.
  • Dangerous Minds notes that someone has actually begun selling unauthorized action figures of Trump Administration figures like Bannon and Spencer.
  • Language Log looks at a linguistic feature of Emma Watson’s quote, her ending it with a preposition.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen considers, originally for Bloomberg View, if Trump could be seen as a placebo for what ails America.
  • The New APPS Blog takes a Marxist angle on the issue of big data, from the perspective of (among other things) primitive accumulation.
  • The Search reports on the phenomenon of the Women’s History Month Wikipedia edit-a-thon, aiming to literally increase the representation of notable women on Wikipedia.
  • Towleroad notes the six men who will be stars of a new Fire Island reality television show.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy finds some merit in Ben Carson’s description of American slaves as immigrants. (Some.)
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Belarusians are beginning to mobilize against their government and suggests they are already making headway.

[PHOTO] Five photos from the Ivan Harris Gallery, Canadian Broadcasting Centre, Toronto (#cbc)

The Canadian Broadcasting Centre‘s Ivan Harris Gallery is hidden away from the CBC Museum, behind the escalator leading to the Centre’s food court. My attention was caught by the vintage technology on display, by the RCA TK-76 A camera that enabled mobile news gathering in the late 1970s, or the Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 100 that could transmit as many as ten pages of text (!) from the field.

RCA TK-76 A Electronic News Gathering (ENG) Camera)

Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 100

Televisions of the 1950s

Sound mixer

Tape recorder

Written by Randy McDonald

February 24, 2017 at 1:30 pm