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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘terraforming

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • James Bow considers the idea of Christian privilege.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the oddities of Ross 128.
  • D-Brief shares Matthew Buckley’s proposal that it is possible to make planets out of dark matter.
  • Dead Things reports on the discoveries at Madjedbebe, in northern Australia, suggesting humans arrived 65 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on the idea that advanced civilizations may use sunshades to protect their worlds from overheating. (For terraforming purposes, too.)
  • Language Hat notes the struggles of some Scots in coming up with a rationalized spelling for Scots. What of “hert”?
  • The LRB Blog considers the way in which the unlimited power of Henry VIII will be recapitulated post-Brexit by the UK government.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes the High Park production of King Lear.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the idea that Pluto’s moons, including Charon, might be legacies of a giant impact.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the terrible anti-trans “Civil Rights Uniformity Act.” Americans, please act.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers/u> the perhaps-unique way a sitting American president might be charged with obstruction of justice.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at some stunning imagery of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter.
  • Inkfish notes that some jumping spiders do not just look like ants, they walk like them, too.
  • Language Log has gentle fun with the trend to develop heat maps for American English dialects.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the idea of disgust as it is made to relate to the homeless.
  • Siva Vijenthira at Spacing considers the particular importance of biking for the independence of women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers whether or not terraforming Mars is worth it. (Yes, but it will be costly.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that China is displacing Russia, despite the latter’s efforts, as the main trade partner of smaller post-Soviet countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares an amusing photo of the Wonder Bears of Provincetown.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling looks at the art scene in Istanbul.
  • Crooked Timber takes issue with Tyler Cowen’s support for school vouchers.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes signs that the ephemeral Martian lakes were temporary creations of methane outbursts, and considers how to use WISE to hunt for Planet Nine.
  • Far Outliers looks at Britain’s contracts with petty German states for soldiers.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas looks at Trump in the context of the conflict between orality and literacy.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Donald Trump’s complication of the United States’ China policy and reports that Seattle’s new minimum wage has apparently not led to job loss.
  • The LRB Blog reports on The Gambia on the eve of the elections.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that truth is essential for liberty and freedom.
  • From the Heart of Europe’s Nicholas Whyte looks at the strange history of an enclave on the border of Belfast.
  • pollotenchegg maps language in Ukraine.
  • Savage Minds announces that the blog will seek a new name, and that they are looking for suggestions.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia’s fertility uptick will not alter the dynamics of population loss, and reports on a Russian radical’s astonishing suggestion that Russia is now in the same position versus Ukraine as Nazi Germany was versus Poland.

[LINK] “Geoengineering to Alter Climate Moves Closer to Reality”

Bloomberg’s Anna Hirtenstein argues that geoengineering is set to become a real thing, as we end up trying desperately to manage the consequence of uncontrolled environmental pollution and consequent climate change.

A United Nations body is investigating controversial methods to avert runaway climate change by giving humans the go-ahead to re-engineer the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere.

So-called geoengineering is seen as necessary to achieve the COP21 Paris agreement clinched in December, when 197 countries pledged to keep global temperatures rises below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), according to researchers who produced a report for the UN Convention on Biological Diversity.

“Within the Paris agreement there’s an implicit assumption that there will need to be greenhouse gases removed,” said Phil Williamson, a scientist at the U.K.’s University of East Anglia, who worked on the report. “Climate geoengineering is what countries have agreed to do, although they haven’t really realized that they’ve agreed to do it.”

Large-scale geoengineering may include pouring nutrients into oceans to save coral habitats or spraying tiny particles into the Earth’s atmosphere to reflect sun rays back into space. Geoengineering proposals have been shunned because of their unpredictable consequences on global ecosystems.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 10, 2016 at 9:40 pm

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • Bloomberg notes political despair in Japan’s industrial heartland and looks at Argentina’s statistical issues.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on Morocco’s continued industrialization and describes the fear of a Vancouver-based pop singer for the life of her mother in China.
  • The Inter Press Service notes the recent terror attack in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital.
  • MacLean’s notes the good relations of Israel and Egypt.
  • The National Post reports on recent discoveries of quiet black holes.
  • Open Democracy looks at the connections between migration and housing policy in the United Kingdom.
  • Transitions Online notes how Brexit has wrecked central Europe’s relationships with the United Kingdom.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross fears the arrival of fascism in Britain after the murder of Jo Cox.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on SDSSJ1043+0855, a white dwarf apparently consuming a rocky planet.
  • The Crux notes discussion of terraforming Mars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the revealing result of a study of the crops that ancient Indonesians brought to Madagascar.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers hierarchy has manifested in a dance competition being filmed for television.
  • The LRB Blog considers the state of Algerian and Arab-language literature.
  • The Map Room Blog maps migrant deaths in the Mediterranean.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the collapse of coal companies in the United States.
  • The Power and the Money notes that Puerto Rico is not a colony of the United States.
  • Savage Minds considers at length the situation of Crimea and of Crimean Tatars.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if the West is forgetting about Ukraine.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Bloomberg notes the upcoming meeting of North Korea’s governing party, observes the absence of a groundswell in favour of Brexit in the United Kingdom, and notes NIMBYism can appear in many forms.
  • CBC reports on the upcoming summit of North American leaders, notes Mike Duffy’s first appearance in the Senate, reports on the likely huge toll of insurance payouts in Fort McMurray, and notes the dependence of many Syrian refugees on food banks in Canada.
  • The Independent notes that Brexit might depend on the votes of Wales, which could be swayed either way by the fate of the Port Talbot steel plant.
  • The Inter Press Service notes, in a photo essay, how Third World farmers are seeking a technological revolution for their industry.
  • National Geographic notes how Atlantic City is coping with rising seas, mainly badly in ways which hurt the poor.
  • Open Democracy considers the Argentine government’s likely approach to geopolitics in the South Atlantic.
  • Universe Today notes the possible discovery of a new particle and looks at how Ceres might, or might not, be terraformed.
  • Wired looks at a new documentary on film projectionists and reports on the difficulties of fighting the Alberta wildfire.