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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘terrorism

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the challenges and the prospects of laser SETI.
  • Citizen Science Salon reports on a couple who have done their best to keep their bee numbers up.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Milo’s book, contrary to Milo’s claims, has performed very badly indeed in the UK, among other places.
  • Language Log features a poetic digression by Victor Mair on Chinese characters for words like “plum” and “wine.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that moderate Republicans in Congress might not be all that.
  • The LRB Blog considers Nice at, and after, the time of last year’s terrorist attacks.
  • Marginal Revolution features Tyler Cowen’s description of his writing processes.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Toronto gay photographer Dylan Rosser.
  • Unicorn Booty looks back at the history of the queercore movement–gay punk, as a first approximation.
  • Vintage Space links to an article explaining why there was neither an Apollo 2 nor an Apollo 3.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian state is undermining various once-allied Russian nationalist movements.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO describes the changing designs of TTC maps over the past generations.
  • Cody Delistraty links to an article of his contrasting and comparing Donald Trump to Louis XIV.
  • Marginal Revolution shares facts about Qatar in this time of its issues.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the latest innovations in his homebrew blogging.
  • Towleroad notes the sad anniversary of the Pulse massacre in Orlando, particularly for queers of colour.
  • Window on Eurasia argues for the potential of Idel-Ural, a coalition of non-Russian minorities by the Volga.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines how Labour and the Tories used Big Data, and how Labour did much better.

[NEWS] Eight links from around the world

  • Yahoo News shares the story of a cat that visited every national park in the United States, with photos.
  • CBC’s Mike Crawley takes a look at the impact of the Ontario $15 minimum wage, finding it should have little effect on the economy at large.
  • In The Globe and Mail, Tony Keller suggests that Donald Trump’s actions do a great job of promoting China as a responsible superpower.
  • CBC notes research suggesting that global warming will make the heat island effect in cities much worse.
  • It is easy, editor David Shribman of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writes in The Globe and Mail, to mistake Pittsburgh for Paris.
  • The Toronto Star notes Ariana Grande’s surprise visit to her fans in hospital before tomorrow benefit concert.
  • The Atlantic reports on the problems of post-Communist gentrification in Moscow.
  • The Georgia Straight shares one Vancouver artist’s goodbye to her adopted city, beloved but now too expensive.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams describes a new type of planet, the molten hot rubble cloud “synestia”.
  • Far Outliers describes the Polish rebels exiled to Siberia in the 19th century.
  • Language Hat looks at words for porridge in Bantuphone Africa.
  • Language Log examines whistling as a precursor to human language.
  • The LRB considers the new normal of the terrorist state of emergency.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the weakness of the Indian labour market.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to explain to Uruguayans how Donald Trump made his mistake on the budget.
  • Savage Minds remembers the late anthropologist of Polynesia and space colonization, Ben Finney.
  • Towleroad examines the rather depressing idea of a porn-dominated sexuality.
  • Understanding Society examines Hindu/Muslim tensions in India.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the weakness of Belarus’ opposition.
  • Arnold Zwicky talks about Arthur Laurents.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes the recent municipal vote clearing the way for the construction of the Downtown Relief Line.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly wonders, in the context of growing inequality and poverty, how workers in the United States can be free.
  • Centauri Dreams examines exoplanet TRAPPIST-1h.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the upset of Taiwanese homophobes with the idea of marriage equality and reports on the possibility of a million people dying on account of Trump cuts to HIV/AIDS programs internationally.
  • Language Log considers the use of the emoji in the Sinosphere.
  • The LRB Blog looks at terrorism and the ways it interacts malignly with the news cycle.
  • The NYRB Daily examines the anonymous “Berlin Painter” of ancient Athens.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer argues that the particular structure of health care locks it into certain plausible paths for reform.
  • Torontoist argues that indigenous writers’ concerns about inclusion need to be addressed.
  • Towleroad looks at how some parents of gay children were pushed out of Shanghai’s “marriage market”.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the relative strengths of Ukraine’s two churches and looks at Russia’s trade with North Korea.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines the post-war economic structures of the United Kingdom in the context of struggles between multilateralists and unilateralists.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the SPECULOOS red dwarf observation program.
  • The Crux examines VX nerve agent, the chemical apparently used to assassinate the half-brother of North Korea’s ruler.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos of the inhabitants of the Tokyo night, like gangsters and prostitutes and drag queens.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines Donald Trump’s tepid and belated denunciation of anti-Semitism.
  • Language Log looks at the story of the Wenzhounese, a Chinese group notable for its diaspora in Italy.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the by-elections in the British ridings of Stoke and Copeland and notes the problems of labour.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a post-Brexit map of the European Union with an independent Scotland.
  • Marginal Revolution reports that a border tax would be a poor idea for the United States and Mexico.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the art of the medieval Tibetan kingdom of Guge.
  • Otto Pohl notes the 73rd anniversary of Stalin’s deportation of the Chechens and the Ingush.
  • Supernova Condensate points out that Venus is actually the most Earth-like planet we know of. Why do we not explore it more?
  • Towleroad notes Depeche Mode’s denunciation of the alt-right and Richard Spencer.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi considers the question of feeling empathy for horrible people.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the thousands of Russian citizens involved with ISIS and examines the militarization of Kaliningrad.

[ISL] “Trying to Stanch Trinidad’s Flow of Young Recruits to ISIS”

Frances Robles’ front page article in The New York Times noting how Muslims from Trinidad and Tobago are being recruited in large numbers for ISIS and like organizations is alarming.

Law enforcement officials in Trinidad and Tobago, a small Caribbean island nation off the coast of Venezuela, are scrambling to close a pipeline that has sent a steady stream of young Muslims to Syria, where they have taken up arms for the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL.

American officials worry about having a breeding ground for extremists so close to the United States, fearing that Trinidadian fighters could return from the Middle East and attack American diplomatic and oil installations in Trinidad, or even take a three-and-a-half-hour flight to Miami.

President Trump spoke by telephone over the weekend with Prime Minister Keith Rowley of Trinidad and Tobago about terrorism and other security challenges, including foreign fighters, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, a White House spokeswoman, said.

Trinidad has a history of Islamist extremism — a radical Muslim group was responsible for a failed coup in 1990 that lasted six days, and in 2012 a Trinidadian man was sentenced to life in prison for his role in a plot to blow up Kennedy International Airport. Muslims make up only about 6 percent of the population, and the combatants often come from the margins of society, some of them on the run from criminal charges.

They saw few opportunities in an oil-rich nation whose economy has declined with the price of petroleum, experts say. Some were gang members who either converted or were radicalized in prison, while others have been swayed by local imams who studied in the Middle East, according to Muslim leaders and American officials.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 22, 2017 at 6:30 pm