A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘terrorism

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bruce Dorminey notes that a Brazilian startup hopes to send a Brazilian probe to lunar orbit, for astrobiological research.
  • Far Outliers notes the scale of the Western aid funneled to the Soviet Union through Murmansk in the Second World War.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Tarell Alvin McCraney, author of the play adapted into the stunning Moonlight, now has a new play set to premier on Brodway for the 2018-2019 season, Choir Boy.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the conspiracy behind the sabotage that led to the destruction in 1916 of a munitions stockpile on Black Tom Island, of German spies with Irish and Indian nationalists.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of the false equivalence in journalism that, in 2016, placed Trump on a level with Hillary.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that fitness app Strava can be used to detect the movements of soldiers (and others) around classified installations.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a New York Times profile of World Bank president Jim Young Kim.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about the joys of stuffed bread, paan, in Sri Lanka.
  • Towleroad notes that a Russian gay couple whose marriage in Denmark was briefly recognized in Russia are now being persecuted.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi tells the story of his favourite teacher, Keith Johnson, and a man who happened to be gay. Would that all students could have been as lucky as Scalzi.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the pronatalist policies of the Putin regime, which have basically cash subsidies to parents, have not reversed underlying trends towards population decline.
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that the discovery of an ancient Homo sapiens jawbone in Israel pushes back the history of our species by quite a bit.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of spiral galaxy NGC 1398.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the ways in which the highly reflective surface of Europa might be misleading to probes seeking to land on its surface.
  • The Dragon’s Tales rounds up more information about extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua.
  • Far Outliers considers the staggering losses, human and territorial and strategic, of Finland in the Winter War.
  • Hornet Stories notes preliminary plans to set up an original sequel to Call Me Be Your Name later in the 1980s, in the era of AIDS.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res considers if Wichita will be able to elect a Wichitan as governor of Kansas, for the first time in a while.
  • io9 takes a look at the interesting ways in which Star Wars and Star Trek have been subverting traditional audience assumptions about these franchises.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining what decision-makers in North Vietnam were thinking on the eve of the Tet offensive, fifty years ago.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at a new book examining the 1984 IRA assassination attempt against Margaret Thatcher.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article examining how school districts, not just electoral districts, can be products of gerrymandering.
  • Marginal Revolution seeks suggestions for good books to explain Canada to non-Canadians, and comes up with a shortlist of its own.
  • Kenan Malik at the NYR Daily takes a look at contemporary efforts to justify the British Empire as good for its subjects. Who is doing this, and why?

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a stunning photo of two galaxies colliding in the eternal night and considers the implications of the Milky Way’s future encounter with Andromeda.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the latest discoveries regarding FRB 121102 and fast radio bursts generally.
  • Hornet Stories suggests that a recent ruling by the Inter American Court of Human Rights sets the stage for marriage equality across Latin America.
  • Inkfish notes that the biomass of dead squid mothers plays a major role in the environments and ecologies of seafloors.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests retirees can actually learn a lot from the lifestyles of members of the RV–recreational vehicle–community.
  • Language Hat reports on wordplay, and its translations, in the works of Homer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the turn to anti-intellectualism among American conservatives.
  • At Lingua Franca, William Germano talks about telling numbers.
  • The LRB Blog notes the story of the English village of Imber, intentionally depopulated by the British military during the Second World War and never allowed to be restored.
  • The NYR Daily talks about a London exhibition on the art of our era of terrorism and terror.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest Juno discoveries from Jupiter.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell reports on a debate as to whether the origin of life is a more difficult question than the origin of consciousness.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the simple pleasures of an iced coffee enjoyed in the Australian Outback.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel U>considers an interesting question: is ours the only advanced civilization in the universe?
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little tackles the concept of organizational cultures.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that post-1991 immigrants from the former Soviet Union form a tenth of the Russian labour force.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Industry Street and York, Parkdale condos, Tories, Black Friday

  • Daniel Rotsztain writes about how Industry Street in the old city of York is becoming the heart of a new sort of inner suburb stretch, over in The Globe and Mail.
  • NOW Toronto looks at some of the massive new condo developments scheduled to develop in Parkdale in the next few years. This neighbourhood will not look the same. More here.
  • The Tories’ project for Toronto, involving massive investment in subways, looks nice. Is it? The Toronto Star has more.
  • I agree entirely with Edward Keenan’s argument about how Toronto City Hall should be open to everyone. The article is at the Toronto Star, here.
  • Black Friday was as huge as you’d expect in Toronto this year. The Toronto Star reports here.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: TTC noise, West Queen West taxes, terrorism, financial sector

  • Global News notes one report suggesting high levels of noise on the TTC could cause hearing loss.
  • Massive tax increases linked to development are now subjecting West Queen West to the possibility of being developed out of existence, at least for many of its businesses. blogTO reports.
  • This report suggesting architectural and other design changes to Toronto City Hall, to protect against terrorism, is saddening. The Toronto Star has it.
  • More than 7% of employment in Toronto is linked to the financial sector. Will this city become a truly major international hub, I wonder? The Globe and Mail reports.

[PHOTO] Three photos of Air India Flight 182 Memorial, Humber Bay Park East, Toronto

I visited the memorial to Air India Flight 182 for the first time last year when I visited Humber Bay Park East. I stopped by this solemn place again this September, as I walked along the shores of Humber Bay. The central sundial is a beautiful feature, linking this location with a kindred memorial in the Irish village of Ahakista.

Plaque #toronto #humberbayparkeast #airindiaflight182 #airindia182 #flight182 #inmemoriam #plaque #latergram

Sundial #toronto #humberbayparkeast #airindiaflight182 #airindia182 #flight182 #inmemoriam #sundial #latergram

Memorial #toronto #humberbayparkeast #airindiaflight182 #airindia182 #flight182 #inmemoriam #sundial #plaque #memorial #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

November 23, 2017 at 11:00 am

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting exoplanet transits could start a galactic communications network.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the connections between eating and identity.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas looks at the need for a critical study of the relationship between technology and democracy.
  • Language Hat notes how nationalism split Hindustani into separate Hindi and Urdu languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on the grim outlook in Somalia after the terrible recent Mogadishu bombing.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen thinks Trump’s decertification of the Iran deal is a bad idea.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article imagining a counter-mapping of the Amazon by indigenous peoples.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the possibility of Parkinson’s being a prion disease, somewhat like mad cow disease.
  • The NYR Daily notes that a Brexit driven by a perceived need to take back control will not meet that need, at all.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the problem Sydney faces as it booms.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the extent to which an independent Catalonia would be ravaged economically by a non-negotiated secession.
  • Peter Watts tells the sad story of an encounter between Toronto police and a homeless man he knows.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a Sakhalin bridge, like a Crimea bridge, may not come off because of Russian weakness.