A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘texas

[NEWS] Five sci-tech links: NASA climate, Starlink, CO2 on the seabed, moving Earth, neutrino beams

  • Evan Gough at Universe Today notes that the long-term climate predictions of NASA have so far proven accurate to within tenths of a degree Celsius.
  • Matt Williams at Universe Today notes how the launching of satellites for the Starlink constellation, providing Internet access worldwide, could be a game-changer.
  • Eric Niiler at WIRED suggests that Texas–and other world regions–could easily sequester carbon dioxide in the seabed, in the case of Texas using the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Matteo Ceriotti explains at The Conversation how, as in The Wandering Earth, the Earth might be physically moved. https://theconversation.com/wandering-earth-rocket-scientist-explains-how-we-could-move-our-planet-116365ti

  • Matt Williams at Universe Today shares a remarkable proposal, suggesting Type II civilizations might use dense bodies like black holes to create neutrino beam beacons.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at the German city of Nordlingen, formed in a crater created by the impact of a binary asteroid with Earth.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the possibility that the farside of the Moon might bear the imprint of an ancient collision with a dwarf planet the size of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that dredging for the expansion of the port of Miami has caused terrible damage to corals there.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the last appearances of David Bowie and Iggy Pop together on stage.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China is on track to launch an ambitious robotic mission to Mars in 2020.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog talks about what sociological research actually is.
  • Gizmodo reports on the discovery of a torus of cool gas circling Sagittarius A* at a distance of a hundredth of a light-year.
  • io9 reports about Angola Janga, an independent graphic novel by Marcelo D’Salete showing how slaves from Africa in Brazil fought for their freedom and independence.
  • The Island Review shares some poems of Matthew Landrum, inspired by the Faroe Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. looks at how creationists are mocking flat-earthers for their lack of scientific knowledge.
  • Language Hat looks at the observations of Mary Beard that full fluency in ancient Latin is rare even for experts, for reasons I think understandable.
  • Melissa Byrnes wrote at Lawyers, Guns and Money about the meaning of 4 June 1989 in the political transitions of China and Poland.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how the New York Times has become much more aware of cutting-edge social justice in recent years.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the memories and relics of the Sugar Land prison complex outside of Houston, Texas, are being preserved.
  • Jason C Davis at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the differences between LightSail 1 and the soon-to-be-launched LightSail 2.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks in detail at the high electricity prices in Argentina.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the problems with electric vehicle promotion on PEI.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at when the universe will have its first black dwarf. (Not in a while.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Belarusians are not as interested in becoming citizens of Russia as an Internet poll suggests.
  • Arnold Zwicky highlights a Pride Month cartoon set in Antarctica featuring the same-sex marriage of two penguins.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven cities links: Montréal;, Québec City, Saint John, Moncton, D.C., Dallas, …

  • CBC Montreal reports on how a downsizing Montréal-area convent recently put on a very large yard sale.
  • Will the staged construction of a tramway in Québec City lead to the partial completion of that project? CBC examines the issue.
  • The New Brunswick city of Saint John recently celebrated its Loyalist heritage. Global News reports.
  • The new community garden in Moncton sounds lovely. Global News reports.
  • CityLab notes the sad precedent of the privatization of an old Carnegie Library in Washington D.C. into an Apple Store.
  • CityLab considers if cycling can make inroads in pro-car Dallas.
  • Open Democracy examines the controversy surrounding the contested construction of an Orthodox church in Yekaterinburg.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Brooklyn and Queens, Calgary, El Paso, Sheffield, Nairobi

  • Curbed looks at what is happening with the proposed new streetcar route connecting Brooklyn and Queens.
  • Urban farm Grow Calgary has found a new home in the southeast of that city. Global News reports.
  • The claim of Donald Trump that Texas border city El Paso was a criminalized disaster spinning out of control is, of course, provably wrong. VICE has it.
  • This Guardian feature shares the responses of readers to an article looking at the decline of the high street of the English city of Sheffield.
  • CityLab looks</u at the impact of terrorism on Nairobi, at the growing presence of elements of security theatre on the street and at the targeting of ethnic Somalis in Eastleigh.

[URBAN NOTE] Six city links: Oshawa, Saint John, Manhattan, Surat, Tokyo, Austin

  • After GM’s closure in Oshawa, the National Observer wonders if Oshawa can pivot over to perhaps take advantage of opportunities in the green economy.
  • Will Saint John, New Brunswick, be able to break out of its long decline and find a new raison d’être? Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities takes a look at the new super-tall luxury towers, homes to the rich, dotting–disfiguring?–the Manhattan skyline.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how the Indian city of Surat, endangered by flooding from sea and river, is trying to adapt to its environment.
  • Even as the overall population of Japan continues to decline, the population of Tokyo continues to grow through net migration, Mainichi reports.
  • The Texas capital of Austin, CityLab reports, is trying to create new institutions and structures to help connect older and younger generations.

[BLOG] Five city links: Mississauga, Simcoe County, Detrroit, Burnaby, El Paso

  • Hazel McCallion, the nonagenarian former mayor of Mississauga, has been appointed an advisor to the Ford government in Ontario. Global News reports.
  • A Simcoe County that faces a threat of amalgamation under the Ontario provincial government is already composed of communities feeling they lack adequate representation. The Toronto Star reports.
  • CityLab notes how a history of racism complicated efforts to plant new trees in Detroit.
  • Douglas Todd at the Vancouver Sun notes how ethnic tensions in multicultural South Burnaby surfaced in the former Liberal candidate’s treatment of NDP leader Jagmeet Singh.
  • The NYR Daily looks at what is going on in and around El Paso as the Mexican-American border facing further closing.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Kingston, Montréal, Reynosa and McAllen, Sao Paulo, Dar es Salaam

  • The reopening of Bellevue House, the old Kingston home of John A. MacDonald, has been delayed by Parks Canada. Global News reports.
  • MTL Blog shares a video taken by two people who visited each and every one of the nearly 70 stops of the Montréal subway system in just four hours.</li.
  • The mayors of Reynosa in Mexico and McAllen in the United States, sister cities on the Texas frontier, oppose policies and structures that would divide their binational community. VICE reports.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the difficulties of getting accessible Internet for many in Sao Paulo.
  • Guardian Cities looks on how Dar es Salaam, the emerging megacity of Tanzania, has developed an affordable and rapid bus system.