A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘theatre

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope shares an essay he recently presented on artificial intelligence and its challenges for us.
  • P. Kerim Friedman writes at {anthro}dendum about the birth of the tea ceremony in the Taiwan of the 1970s.
  • Anthropology net reports on a cave painting nearly 44 thousand years old in Indonesia depicting a hunting story.
  • Architectuul looks at some temporary community gardens in London.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on the weird history of asteroid Ryugu.
  • The Buzz talks about the most popular titles borrowed from the Toronto Public Library in 2019.
  • Caitlin Kelly talks at the Broadside Blog about her particular love of radio.
  • Centauri Dreams talks about the role of amateur astronomers in searching for exoplanets, starting with LHS 1140 b.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber looks at what is behind the rhetoric of “virtue signalling”.
  • Dangerous Minds shares concert performance from Nirvana filmed the night before the release of Nevermind.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes new evidence that, even before the Chixculub impact, the late Cretaceous Earth was staggering under environmental pressures.
  • Myron Strong at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about how people of African descent in the US deal with the legacies of slavery in higher education.
  • Far Outliers reports on the plans in 1945 for an invasion of Japan by the US.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing gathers together a collection of the author’s best writings there.
  • Gizmodo notes the immensity of the supermassive black hole, some 40 billion solar masses, at the heart of galaxy Holm 15A 700 million light-years away.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res writes about the issue of how Wichita is to organize its civic politics.
  • io9 argues that the 2010s were a decade where the culture of the spoiler became key.
  • The Island Review points readers to the podcast Mother’s Blood, Sister’s Songs, an exploration of the links between Ireland and Iceland.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the claim of the lawyer of the killer of a mob boss that the QAnon conspiracy inspired his actions. This strikes me as terribly dangerous.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at a study examining scholarly retractions.
  • Language Hat shares an amusing cartoon illustrating the relationships of the dialects of Arabic.
  • Language Log lists ten top new words in the Japanese language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the dissipation of American diplomacy by Trump.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the many problems in Sparta, Greece, with accommodating refugees, for everyone concerned.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting the decline of the one-child policy in China has diminished child trafficking, among other crimes.
  • Sean Marshall, looking at transit in Brampton, argues that transit users need more protection from road traffic.
  • Russell Darnley shares excerpts from essays he wrote about the involvement of Australia in the Vietnam War.
  • Peter Watts talks about his recent visit to a con in Sofia, Bulgaria, and about the apocalypse, here.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the corporatization of the funeral industry, here.
  • Diane Duane writes, from her own personal history with Star Trek, about how one can be a writer who ends up writing for a media franchise.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections considers the job of tasting, and rating, different cuts of lamb.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a nondescript observatory in the Mojave desert of California that maps the asteroids of the solar system.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Eduardo Chavarin about, among other things, Tijuana.
  • Drew Rowsome loves the SpongeBob musical.
  • Peter Rukavina announces that Charlottetown has its first public fast charger for electric vehicles.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog considers the impact of space medicine, here.
  • The Signal reports on how the Library of Congress is making its internet archives more readily available, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how the incredibly isolated galaxy MCG+01-02-015 will decay almost to nothing over almost uncountable eons.
  • Strange Company reports on the trial and execution of Christopher Slaughterford for murder. Was there even a crime?
  • Strange Maps shares a Coudenhove-Kalergi map imagining the division of the world into five superstates.
  • Understanding Society considers entertainment as a valuable thing, here.
  • Denis Colombi at Une heure de peine announces his new book, Où va l’argent des pauvres?
  • John Scalzi at Whatever looks at how some mailed bread triggered a security alert, here.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the massive amount of remittances sent to Tajikistan by migrant workers, here.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes a bizarre no-penguins sign for sale on Amazon.

[URBAN NOTE] Eight Toronto links

  • blogTO notes the strange house, a fantasia inspired by Greece, at 1016 Shaw Street.
  • blogTO shares photos from inside Paradise Theatre on Bloor, reopened after 13 years.
  • blogTO notes that GO Transit will now be offering customers unlimited rides on Sundays for just $C 10.
  • Photos of infamous Toronto chair girl Marcella Zoia celebrating her 20th birthday are up at blogTO, here.
  • Many residents displaced by the Gosford fire in North York have been moved to hotels. Global News reports.
  • A TTC worker has launched a court case against the TTC and city of Toronto over issues of air quality. Global News reports.
  • Jamie Bradburn reports on how the Toronto press covered the opening of the Suez Canal, here.
  • Transit Toronto explains what, exactly, workers are building at Eglinton station and Yonge and Eglinton more generally.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul visits the studio of Barbas Lopes Arquitectos in Lisbon, here.
  • Bad Astronomer takes a look at a new paper examining the effectiveness of different asteroid detection technologies, including nuclear weapons.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting potentially habitable planets orbiting Alpha Centauri B, smaller of the two stars, could suffer from rapid shifts of their axes.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber argues some polls suggest some American conservatives really would prefer Russia as a model to California.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery, by the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia, of 27 supernova remnants in our galaxy.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about stealth aircraft, here.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting that DNA is but one of very very many potential genetic molecules.
  • Language Hat shares a reevaluation of the Richard Stanyhurst translation of the Aeneid, with its manufactured words. Why mightn’t this have been not mockable but rather creative?
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrated the 50th anniversary of the takeover of Alcatraz Island by Native American activists.
  • Chris Bertram writes at the LRB Blog, after the catastrophe of the Essex van filled with dozens of dead migrants, about the architecture of exclusion that keeps out migrants.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a comment looking at the fentanyl crisis from a new angle.
  • Jenny Uglow writes at the NYR Daily about a Science Museum exhibit highlighting the dynamic joys of science and its progress over the centuries.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes a look at the question of how to prevent the wildfires currently raging in Australia. What could have been done, what should be done?
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on proposals from China for two long-range probe missions to interstellar space, including a Neptune flyby.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the wonderfully innocent Pinocchio currently playing at the Young People’s Theatre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the evidence for the universe, maybe, being closed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Alexandria Patriarchate is the next Orthodox body to recognize the Ukrainian church.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at irregular versus regular, as a queer word too.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

(A day late, I know; I crashed after work yesterday.)

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross has a thought experiment: If you were superwealthy and guaranteed to live a long health life, how would you try to deal with the consequence of economic inequality?
  • Vikas Charma at Architectuul takes a look at the different factors that go into height in buildings.
  • Bad Astronomy notes S5-HVS1, a star flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy by Sagittarius A* at 1755 kilometres per second.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares photos from two Manhattan walks of hers, taken in non-famous areas.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at habitability for red dwarf exoplanets. Stellar activity matters.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber shares words from a manifesto about data protection in the EU.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos from Los Angeles punks and mods and others in the 1980s.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a ESA report suggesting crew hibernation could make trips to Mars easier.
  • Gizmodo notes that the Hayabusa2 probe of Japan is returning from asteroid Ryugu with a sample.
  • Imageo shares photos of the disastrous fires in Australia from space.
  • Information is Beautiful reports on winners of the Information is Beautiful Awards for 2019, for good infographics.
  • JSTOR Daily explains how local television stations made the ironic viewing of bad movies a thing.
  • Kotaku reports on the last days of Kawasaki Warehouse, an arcade in Japan patterned on the demolished Walled City of Kowloon.
  • Language Hat notes how translation mistakes led to the star Beta Cygni gaining the Arabic name Albireo.
  • Language Log reports on a unique Cantonese name of a restaurant in Hong Kong.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an analysis of his suggesting the military of India is increasingly hard-pressed to counterbalance China.
  • The LRB Blog notes the catastrophe of Venice.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting states would do well not to place their capitals too far away from major population centres.
  • Justin Petrone at North! remarks on a set of old apple preserves.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the west and the east of the European Union are divided by different conceptions of national identity.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reports from his town of Armidale as the smoke from the Australian wildfires surrounds all. The photos are shocking.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog lists some books about space suitable for children.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Canadian film music Stand!, inspired by the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting that, in Switzerland, parenthood does not make people happy.
  • The Signal notes that 1.7 million phone book pages have been scanned into the records of the Library of Congress.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains the concept of multi-messenger astronomy and why it points the way forward for studies of astrophysics.
  • Strange Maps looks at how a majority of students in the United States attend diverse schools, and where.
  • Strange Company explores the mysterious death of Marc-Antoine Calas, whose death triggered the persecution of Huguenots and resulted in the mobilization of Enlightenment figures like Voltaire against the state. What happened?
  • Towleroad hosts a critical, perhaps disappointed, review of the major gay play The Inheritance.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at the power of individual people in political hierarchies.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion piece noting how many threats to the Russian language have come from its association with unpopular actions by Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores queens as various as Elizabeth I and Adore Delano.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Anthrodendum features a guest post from editors introducing a series on fieldwork and trauma.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin takes a stab at trying to define neoliberalism as an ideology, not just a catch-all phrase.
  • The Crux looks at desalination, a difficult process that we may need to use regardless of its difficulty.
  • D-Brief notes that narcissism is linked to lower levels of stress and depression.
  • Jezebel notes the return and legacy of Bratz dolls.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the Sam Smith cover of the Donna Summer classic “I Feel Love”, along with other versions of that song.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if graphene will ever become commercially usable.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an analysis warning about commercial debt. Another 2008?
  • Marginal Revolution points to some papers suggesting that cannabis usage does not harm cognition, that the relationship is if anything reversed.
  • Daphne Merkin at the NYR Daily looks back at her literary life, noting people now gone.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new Daniel MacIvor play Let’s Run Away.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how the Trump Administration lost two cases against sanctuary cities.
  • Window on Eurasia considers, briefly, the idea of Gorbachev giving to Germany Kaliningrad, last remnant of East Prussia.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative looks at the rises in health spending directed towards young people. Is this a warning sign of poor health?
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at Gaysper, and then at other queer ghosts.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links

  • I do hope Toronto does something with the abandoned foot court on Queen West and John. blogTO reports.
  • blogTO looks at the new Villiers Island set to occupy the mouth of the Don River in the Port Lands.
  • An Ossington laneway is going to be repainted after a botched improvement project destroyed its public art. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Steve Munro fisks a defense by the Toronto Board of Trade of the proposed Ontario Line, here.
  • Andrew Cash, sadly not elected in my riding of Davenport, writes in the Toronto Star about the importance of Toronto having active local MPs.
  • National Observer looks at how the City of Toronto is encouraging residents grow gardens for pollinators.
  • Samantha Edwards writes at NOW Toronto about how the long-closed Paradise on Bloor theatre is set to reopen in December.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the dusty spiral of galaxy M81, here.
  • Crooked Timber reacts positively to the Astra Taylor short film What Is Democracy?
  • D-Brief notes that, in the South Atlantic, one humpback whale population has grown from 440 individuals to 25 thousand, nearly completing its recovery from whaling-era lows.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at The Iguanas, first band of Iggy Pop.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at consideration in South Korea at building an aircraft carrier.
  • Todd Schoepflin at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the division of labour within his family.
  • Far Outliers looks at 17th century clashes between England and Barbary Pirates.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how antibiotics are getting everywhere, contaminating food chains worldwide.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log looks at the evidence not only for an ancient Greek presence in Central Asia, but for these Greeks’ contact with China.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the attempt by Trump to get Ukraine to spy on his enemies was driven by what Russia and Hungary alleged about corruption in Ukraine.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the transnational criminal network of the Hernandez brothers in Honduras, a source of a refugee diaspora.
  • Marginal Revolution shares an argument suggesting that marriage is useful for, among other things, encouraging integration between genders.
  • Sean Marshall looks at how the death of the Shoppers World in Brampton heralds a new urbanist push in that city.
  • At the NYR Daily, Helen Joyce talks of her therapeutic experiences with psychedelic drugs.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Toronto play The Particulars.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if inflation came before, or after, the Big Bang.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever has a short discussion about Marvel films that concludes they are perfectly valid.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that central Ukraine has emerged as a political force in post-1914 Ukraine.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the Indian pickle.