A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘transgender

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links

  • Jamie Bradburn shares photos from his neighbourhood’s East Lynn Pumpkin Parade, here.
  • Sidewalk Labs is going to release details of all the data it wants to collect. The Toronto Star reports.
  • NOW Toronto reports on the controversy in the NDP riding association for Parkdale-High Park over the nomination, here.
  • There is a napping studio in Toronto, offering people the chance to nap for 25 minutes at $10 per nap. The National Post reports.
  • CBC reports on a film about Little Jamaica, a neighbourhood along Eglinton Avenue West that might be transformed out of existence, here
  • Daily Xtra looks at the legacy of the Meghan Murphy visit to Toronto.
  • Spacing notes that the Toronto Reference Library has a large collection of Communist newspapers available for visitors.
  • The idea of Metrolinx paying for the repair of damaged Eglinton Avenue does make a lot of intuitive sense. CBC reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Toronto links

  • blogTO looks at the Toronto of the 1950s, when Highway 2–Lake Shore and Kingston Road–was the way into the city.
  • Jamie Bradburn takes a look at a 1950 tourist guide to Ontario, specifically focusing on its descriptions of Toronto.
  • Jamie Bradburn looks at how, in the post-war era, dining at the Coxwell Kresge in-house restaurant was a thing.
  • blogTO notes how many in Leslieville are unhappy with the idea of the Ontario Line being built above-ground.
  • Samantha Edwards at NOW Toronto notes that there is going to be a Pride rally outside of Palmerston library where Meghan Murphy will be speaking.
  • Spacing looks at the connections between Nuit Blanche and the Toronto Biennial, for Toronto as an artistic city.
  • NOW Toronto shares some photos of Honest Ed’s in its dying days.
  • Toronto Life tells the story of Peperonata Lane, a west-end laneway that took its name from a popular neighbourhood pepper-roasting event.
  • blogTO notes a new movie being filmed in Regent Park, here.
  • blogTO shares photos of the new Garrison Crossing pedestrian bridge, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Eight Toronto links

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes the latest news on interstellar comet 2/Borisov.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly emphasizes how every writer does need an editor.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the gas giant GJ 3512 b, half the mass of Jupiter orbiting a red dwarf star closely, is an oddly massive exoplanet.
  • Gina Schouten at Crooked Timber looks at inter-generational clashes on parenting styles.
  • D-Brief looks at the methods of agriculture that could conceivably sustain a populous human colony on Mars.
  • Bruce Dorminey argues that we on Earth need something like Starfleet Academy, to help us advance into space.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how the socio-spatial perspective helps us understand the development of cities.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res listens to the Paul McCartney album Flaming Pie.
  • io9 looks at Proxima, a contemporary spaceflight film starring Eva Green.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the intense relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia began in, and reflected, the era of Jim Crow.
  • Language Hat notes a report suggesting that multilingualism helps ward off dementia.
  • Language Log takes issue with the names of the mascots of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the emergence of a ninth woman complaining about being harassed by Al Franken.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new paper arguing that the Washington Consensus worked.
  • The NYR Daily shares an Aubrey Nolan cartoon illustrating the evacuation of war children in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane shares a nice collection of links for digital mapmakers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the European Space Agency supports the cause of planetary defense.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Kenyan writer Kevin Mwachiro at length.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on how a mysterious fast radio burst helped illuminate an equally mysterious galactic halo.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious and unsolved death in 1936 of Canadian student Thomas Moss in an Oxfordshire hayrick.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how Mount Etna is a surpassingly rare decipoint.
  • Understanding Society considers the thought of Kojève, after Hegel, on freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the falling numbers of Russians, and of state support for Russian language and culture, in independent Central Asia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how individual consumer responses are much less effective than concerted collective action in triggering change.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on some transgender fashion models.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the strange galaxy NGC 5866.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly looks at some of her prep work when she covers a news story.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of using the Earth itself for gravitational lensing.
  • D-Brief notes a newly-discovered fossil parrot from New Zealand, a bird nearly one metre in size.
  • Far Outliers looks at the values of cowrie shells in 19th century central Africa. What could they buy?
  • Gizmodo notes the limited circumstances in which IMDb will allow transgender people to remove their birth names from their records.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the abortive American state of Franklin.
  • Language Hat notes a 19th century Russian exile’s experience with the differences between Norwegian and Swedish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes, after Epstein, the incompetence that too often characterizes American prisons.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the importance of slavery in the history of Venice.
  • The NYR Daily notes how W.H. Auden was decidedly unimpressed by the Apollo moon landing, and why.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the import of astronomers’ discovery of an ancient early black hole.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shares a vertical world map from China.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers how competent the Nuclear Regulatory Commission actually is.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the internal divides of Russia.

[NEWS] Ten links about politics and culture and the future

  • The Conversation looks at how the past religious homogeneity of Québec influences contemporary secularism.
  • Scott Gilmore at MacLean’s writes, correctly, about how Canadians in different provinces are deeply disconnected from each other.
  • Shannon Proudfoot writes at MacLean’s about how physicist Philippe J. Fournier ended up developing a second career as a predictor of Canadian elections.
  • Are legal battles between different levels of Canadian government the new normal? CBC considers.
  • The Conversation notes that most rural areas in the United States are bound to decline for structural reasons.
  • This Guardian article looks at how a high-profile gang rape in Spain helped drive the growth of the far-right Vox Party via anti-feminism and misogyny.
  • Jezebel looks at the foolish and shortsighted alliance between transphobic feminists and right-wing groups.
  • Buzzfeed shares the story of how former alt-right activist Katie McHugh is trying to rebuild her life, and her plea to her fellows to leave before they get sucked in.
  • Paul Salvatori writes at NOW Toronto about how the algorithms of major social networking platforms suck people into becoming consumers of inflammatory content.
  • Maggie Hennefeld at Open Democracy considers if “clownish outsiders” are going to be the leaders of the democracies of the future.

[NEWS] Five #Indigenous links: land ownership, astronomy, Pueblo, transgender, MakadeMigize

  • JSTOR Daily looks at the myth that land ownership was not present in pre-Columbian Indigenous cultures in the Americas.
  • CBC takes a look at Indigenous traditions of astronomy.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how white female reformers of the early 20th century US tried to repress the sacred dances of the Pueblo peoples, and why.
  • CBC had a great feature about how Cree doctor James Makokis uses Indigenous perspectives to treat his trans clientele.
  • This report about MakadeMigize Clothing, a company created by a Manitoba family whose clothes are inspired by Indigenous languages. Global News covers the issue.