A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘translation

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the very odd structure of galaxy NGC 2775.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on the 1987 riot by punks that wrecked a Seattle ferry.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on a new suggestion from NASA that the massive dust towers of Mars have helped dry out that world over eons.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how changing technologies have led to younger people spending more social capital on maintaining relationships with friends over family.
  • This forum hosted at Gizmodo considers the likely future causes of death of people in coming decades.
  • In Media Res’ Russell Arben Fox reports on the debate in Wichita on what to do with the Century II performance space.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the decision of Hungary to drop out of Eurovision, apparently because of its leaders’ homophobia.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the debunking of the odd theory that the animals and people of the Americas were degenerate dwarfs.
  • Language Hat reports on how the classics can be served by different sorts of translation.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers how Trump’s liberation of war criminals relates to folk theories about just wars.
  • The LRB Blog reports from the ground in the Scotland riding of East Dunbartonshire.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper suggesting that, contrary to much opinion, social media might actually hinder the spread of right-wing populism.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the nature of the proxy fighters in Syria of Turkey. Who are they?
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Sensational Sugarbum, star of–among other things–the latest Ross Petty holiday farce.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why we still need to be able to conduct astronomy from the Earth.
  • Strange Maps explains the odd division of Europe between east and west, as defined by different subspecies of mice.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Chinese apparently group Uighurs in together with other Central Asians of similar language and religion.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores the concept of onomatomania.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul visits the studio of Barbas Lopes Arquitectos in Lisbon, here.
  • Bad Astronomer takes a look at a new paper examining the effectiveness of different asteroid detection technologies, including nuclear weapons.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting potentially habitable planets orbiting Alpha Centauri B, smaller of the two stars, could suffer from rapid shifts of their axes.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber argues some polls suggest some American conservatives really would prefer Russia as a model to California.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery, by the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia, of 27 supernova remnants in our galaxy.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about stealth aircraft, here.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting that DNA is but one of very very many potential genetic molecules.
  • Language Hat shares a reevaluation of the Richard Stanyhurst translation of the Aeneid, with its manufactured words. Why mightn’t this have been not mockable but rather creative?
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrated the 50th anniversary of the takeover of Alcatraz Island by Native American activists.
  • Chris Bertram writes at the LRB Blog, after the catastrophe of the Essex van filled with dozens of dead migrants, about the architecture of exclusion that keeps out migrants.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a comment looking at the fentanyl crisis from a new angle.
  • Jenny Uglow writes at the NYR Daily about a Science Museum exhibit highlighting the dynamic joys of science and its progress over the centuries.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes a look at the question of how to prevent the wildfires currently raging in Australia. What could have been done, what should be done?
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on proposals from China for two long-range probe missions to interstellar space, including a Neptune flyby.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the wonderfully innocent Pinocchio currently playing at the Young People’s Theatre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the evidence for the universe, maybe, being closed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Alexandria Patriarchate is the next Orthodox body to recognize the Ukrainian church.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at irregular versus regular, as a queer word too.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait urges caution in identifying K2-18b, a mini-Neptune with water vapour in its atmosphere, as Earth-like.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the discovery of C/2019 Q4 (Borisov), a likely interstellar comet like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux reports on the orange roughy, a fish commonly caught as byproduct that can live up to 250 years.
  • D-Brief looks at the harm that may be caused by some insecticides to songbirds, including anorexia and delayed migrations.
  • Dangerous Minds considers if David Bowie actually did burn his 360-ton Glass Spider stage prop.
  • Gizmodo notes the formidable, fanged marsupials once existing in Australia.
  • Imageo notes signs that a dreaded blob of hot water, auguring climate change, might now be lurking in the Pacific Ocean.
  • io9 notes that Ryan Murphy has shared the official title sequence for the 1984 season of American Horror Story.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history, in popular culture and actual technology, of the artificial womb.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how lightly the Sackler family got off for their involvement in triggering the opioid crisis with OxyContin.
  • Marginal Revolution notes many companies are now seeking insurance to protect themselves in the US-China trade war.
  • Tim Parks writes at the NYR Daily about how every era tends to have translations which fit its ethos.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper suggesting that immigration and immigrants do not have major effects on the overall fertility of highly-developed countries.
  • Frank Jacobs notes a mysterious 1920s German map of South America that shows Brasilia, the Brazilian capital built only from 1956. What is up with this?
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the negative effects of massive migration of workers from Tajikistan on the country’s women.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the astounding precision of the new Habitable Planet Finder telescope.
  • D-Brief notes that the lack of small craters on Pluto and Charon suggests there are not many small bodies in the Kuiper Belt.
  • Far Outliers notes the many and widely varying transliterations of Bengali to English.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the extent to which border walls represent, ultimately, a failure of politics.
  • Language Log examines the emergence of the Germanic languages in the depths of prehistory.
  • Anna Aslanyan at the LRB Blog considers the eternal search for a universal language.
  • Noah Smith shareshis Alternative Green New Deal Plan at his blog, one that depends more on technology and market forces than the original.
  • Mitchell Abidor at the NYR Daily writes about the incisive leftism of journalist Victor Sorge.
  • Out There notes the reality that the worlds of our solar system, and almost certainly other systems, are united by a constant stream of incoming rocks.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla examines the data transmitted back by OSIRIS-REx from that probe’s Earth flyby.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines cosmic conditions at the time the solar system formed 4.56 billion or so years ago.
  • Towleroad notes the censorship of many explicitly gay scenes from Bohemian Rhapsody in its Chinese release.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the many ways in which the social norms of North Caucasian men are converging with those of the average Russian.
  • On St. David’s Day, Arnold Zwicky pays tribute to the daffodil and to the Welsh.

[NEWS] Five Indigenous links: Ainu, Mayan cards, food culture, hip-hop, translation

  • Japan Today notes that the Ainu, the indigenous people of the northern island of Hokkaido, are set to be recognized by the Japanese government as indigenous.
  • Atlas Obscura looks at the decks of Mayan playing cards created by the Soviet Union.
  • The Conversation reports on how Indigenous food cultures in Canada can be used to better understand the environment and its changes.
  • Brielle Morgan at The Discourse reports on the Indigenous, political hip-hop of Diana Hellson.
  • CBC reports on the experiences of Priscilla Bosun, official Cree-language translator in the House of Commons.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait writes about the ephemeral nature and historically recent formation of the rings of Saturn.
  • Centauri Dreams hosts an essay looking at the controversies surrounding the arguments of Avi Loeb around SETI and ‘Oumuamua.
  • D-Brief links to a new analysis of hot Jupiters suggesting that they form close to their stars, suggesting further that they are a separate population from outer-system worlds like our Jupiter and Saturn.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the sociology of the online world, using the critical work of Zeynep Tufekci as a lens.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing makes a great point about the seemingly transparent online world: We might, like a protagonist in a Hawthorne story, confine ourselves falsely that we know everything, so becoming jaded.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, in the early 20th century, US Park Rangers were actually quite rough and tumble, an irregular police force.
  • Language Hat looks at the overlooked modernist fiction of Dorothy Richardson.
  • Language Log examines the origins of the phrase “Listen up”.
  • The LRB Blog visits a Berlin cemetery to note the annual commemoration there of the lives of Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the proportion of centenarians on Okinawa, and considers if a carbohydrate-heavy diet featuring sweet potatoes is key.</li<
  • Tim Parks at the NYR Daily engages with the idea of a translation being an accomplishment of its own.
  • Roads and Kingdoms has a fascinating interview with Tanja Fox about the history and development of the Copenhagen enclave of Christiania.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that early returns from New Horizons suggest Ultima Thule is a typical “future comet”.
  • Strange Company shares the story of the haunting of 18th century Gael Donald Bán.
  • Towleroad shares the account by Nichelle Nichols of how her chance encounter with Martin Luther King helped save Star Trek.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the different quasi-embassies of different Russian republics in Moscow, and their potential import.
  • Arnold Zwicky, looking at penguins around the world, notices the CIBC mascot Percy the Penguin.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the remarkable amount of information produced by a study of globular clusters in the Coma cluster of galaxies.
  • Crooked Timber notes the decision of British prosecutors to charge the Stansted 15, people who prevented a flight from taking off with reject asylum claimants, with terrorism-related offenses.
  • The Crux notes some of the remarkable evolutionary tricks that let different insects develop ears and the sense of hearing.
  • D-Brief notes that the Voyager 2 probe has exited the heliosphere, arguably leaving the solar system.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing notes how digital media accentuate the modern world’s fragmentation and exhaustion of time.
  • Information is Beautiful shares the results of this year’s Information is Beauty awards, sharing all sorts of impressive data visualization products including the winner.
  • JSTOR Daily notes some lessons about monks’ organization of time; productivity improvements, with better technology, were used not to increase production but rather to free up time for other uses.
  • Language Hat links to a BBC article noting the potential that machine translation offers for the understanding of Sumerian cuneiform tablets, most of which are untranslated.
  • Rose Jacobs at Lingua Franca announces that, after years of operation, this blog will be closed before the end of the month.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis announces that the OSIRIS-REx probe has detected water on asteroid 101955 Bennu.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the death of his Canadian relative, the anthropologist Cyril Belshaw.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why we have not yet found Earth analog planets.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the leadership of Chechnya has been criticizing neighbouring Dagestan for its treatment of Chechens there.