A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘travel

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.
  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans’ habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, “My Immortal”, has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)
  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.
  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry’s Auroville Café.
  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.
  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.
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[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers the difficulties of the anthropologist in the context of a world where their knowledges are monetized.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days she spent in Montréal, with photos.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about the justice, or lack thereof, in Harvard denying convicted murderer Michelle Jones entry into their doctoral program now that her sentence is over.
  • D-Brief looks at the changing nature of the global disease burden, and its economic consequences.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that Equifax’s terribly lax data protection should mark the endgame for them.
  • The Map Room Blog considers the use of earth-observer satellites to predict future disease outbreaks (malaria, here, in Peru).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how quantum mechanics helps explain nuclear fusion in our sun.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a report that Muscovites live on average 12 years longer than non-Muscovite Russians.

[NEWS] Four Canada links: migration, CNE origami, Parks Canada in #Canada150, and Trans-Canada Trail

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  • At CBC, Don Pittis notes–in this time of a refugee crisis–Canada is economically able to handle more newcomers.
  • I really do want to see this origami diorama tomorrow at the CNE.
  • In this year of free national park admissions, Lauren Krugel notes how Parks Canada prepared for the surge.
  • Atlas Obscura notes that, after almost three decades, the Trans-Canada Trail is finally complete, from coast to coast.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how data mining of stellar surveys led to the discovery of a new star type, the BLAP.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly tells about her enjoyable recent stay at Fire Island.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the latest maneuvers of asteroid probe OSIRIS-REx.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering oxygen in exoplanet atmospheres as a biomarker.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how racist Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio is upset at being called a racist.
  • Language Log notes how China censored images of the Tibetan-language tattoo of MMA fighter Dan Hardy.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how deportees to Mexico are beset by that country’s crime syndicates.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper considering how many sellers a market needs to be competitive.
  • The New APPS Blog considers the racism of Donald Trump in the light of Agamben’s concept of the homo sacer.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers the issue of monuments in Australia in the context of Aborigines’ sufferings by the subjects memorialized.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shows the Jupiter approach videos taken by the Voyager probes.
  • Towleroad explains why Diana, with her embrace of (among other things) fashion and AIDS victims, is a gay icon.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the official registration in Scotland of a tartan for LGBT people.

[URBAN NOTE] Five links about cities, from past Toronto and Richmond to future NYC and Barcelona

  • Scott Wheeler writes about past eminences of Toronto, people like Conn Smythe and Raymond Massey.
  • Joanna Slater writes in The Globe and Mail about the symbolism of Confederate–and other–statuary in Richmond, former capital of the South.
  • Reuters reports on a Vietnamese businessman abducted by his country from the streets of Berlin. Germany is unhappy.
  • Jeremiah Ross argues at VICE that very high levels of tourism in New York City are displacing native-born residents.
  • Looking to protests most recently in Barcelona, Elle Hunt in The Guardian looks at ways to make mass tourism more affordable for destinations.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Bakhtinian Caribana to climate and environment to Leslie Spit

  • Spacing hosts Cheryl Thompson’s article examining Toronto’s Caribbean festival as a Bakhtinian organized chaos.
  • VICE examines how social housing in Canada will be hard-hit by climate change, including rising temperatures.
  • Torontoist shares a sponsored guide to attractions in the Ontario Greenbelt.
  • Laura Howells at the Toronto Star notes that if garlic mustard has to be an invasive plant in the forests of Ontario, at least it helps that it is a tasty invader.
  • Julien Gignac reports on the mystery of who the artist building shrines at Leslie Spit actually is.

[ISL] Four links from Prince Edward Island, of economics and tourism and past migration

  • CBC reports on the recent commemoration of Captain John MacDonald of Glenaladale, pioneer of Scottish Catholic settlers on PEI.
  • CBC reports on the growth of the shoulder, non-summer, tourist seasons in Prince Edward Island.
  • Mitch MacDonald’s article in The Guardian looking at the invasion of Nova Scotia by PEI businesspeople is interesting.
  • After a recent period of convergence, CBC notes PEI wages have declined to about 85% of the Canadian average.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 29, 2017 at 9:00 pm