A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘travel

[NEWS] Five links about Canada, from #Canada150 travel to cultural visibilities

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  • In The Globe and Mail, Ian Brown and Nam Phi Dang’s photo essay tracking the adventures of a bus of Chinese tourists who went from Toronto to the Island and back is insightful and amusing.
  • Alex Ballingall’s account in the Toronto Star of his week-long trek along the Trans-Canada Trail from Niagara to Toronto is enlightening. Would I could do this …
  • Mark Milke in MacLean’s argues that, regrettable excesses aside, Canadians should be proud of our British heritage.
  • The Montreal Gazette‘s Brendan Kelly wonders why a supposedly Canadian music compilation does not include any French-language songs.
  • In the Toronto Star, Emma Teitel points out that visibility, including corporate visibility, is hugely important in Pride.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her vacation in Croatia’s Istria.
  • Centauri Dreams highlights the work of citizen scientists who are producing stunning images of Jupiter through Juno data.
  • Cody Delistraty examines the unique history of Paris’ Maison de Verre, a house made entirely of glass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a recent study suggesting red dwarfs tend to produce stellar winds stripping exo-Earths of their atmospheres.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the mechanics of press censorship in a changing Burma.
  • Language Log’s Geoff Nunberg points out that the phrase “… in the woodpile” is indelibly marked with racism.
  • The NYR Daily remembers the life and notes the death of Xiu Liaobo.
  • Pamela MacNaughtan at Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of how she found the perfect lobster roll on the Iles-de-la-Madeleine.
  • The Signal shares a provocative discussion on the potential role and future decipherability of the emoji in language.
  • Towleroad shares a comforting legal analysis suggesting that marriage equality is not yet threatened in the United States.
  • Transit Toronto notes another weekend subway shutdown, this time on the Bloor line west from Ossington.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that this year will be critical for Russia’s future relationship with Tatarstan.
  • Unicorn Booty largely approves, as do I, of the controversial recent Teen Vogue guide to anal sex. Safe sex is informed sex.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the purple-heavy gardens of his neighbourhood in California.

[NEWS] Five notes about Canada, from GG Julie Payette to lobster sent to China to Syrians in Ontario

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  • Paul Wells reports on the process leading up to the selection of astronaut Julie Payette as Governor-General.
  • At MacLean’s, Scott Gilmore notes that the reluctance of the Conservative Party of Canada to embrace gay people is a big problem.
  • VICE notes that the lobster of Atlantic Canada has become a prominent feature of Canada’s trade with China.
  • Toronto Life shares photos from a four-day vacation of a Syrian refugee family that took them across Ontario.
  • CBC notes that the tourism sector in Jasper is wanting for workers, because of low wages and a high cost of living.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes on how a fossil tooth led eventually to the identification of the fourth Denisovan individual known.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about reasons for people to travel solo.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird notes that the INF Treaty is on the verge of collapse.
  • Mathew Ingram uses a recent GIF of Trump with the Polish president’s wife to show how these lie and mislead.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a sharp collapse in London’s LGBT venues–more than half in the past decade!
  • Marginal Revolution reports on British actors who take up tutoring as a second job to support their careers.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the latest concerns of South Koreans regarding their northern neighbour.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes issue with proposed Australian government surveillance of the local Internet.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell dissects the origins of the false claim that Copernicus was a Catholic priest.
  • Unicorn Booty has a fantastic interview with a scholar, Jamie Bernthal, who makes a case for queer content in Agatha Christie.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that methane bubble explosions in Siberia could wreck Russian pipelines.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • James Bow shares his story of how he met famed Canadian kid’s author Gordon Korman.
  • Paul Drye has sales on this month for his two books, space race WI book False Steps and his first, Passing Strangeness.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes two overlooked episodes of migration in Canada, of Hawaiians in British Columbia and Canadian exiles in Australia.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner shared, again, his personal photo essay about his links to and love of Canada.
  • Language Hat looks at the potentially Australian slang phrase “good on you” (pronounced “good onya”, apparently).
  • Language Hat looks at claims that translation and grammar complicate the meaning of the text authorizing the handover of Hong Kong to China.
  • The LRB Blog announces that their #readeverywhere photo contest is up and running for July!
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares a gorgeous photo essay of her trip to Chania, on Crete.
  • Unicorn Booty has an interesting essay looking at the barriers to membership imposed by gay culture on newly-out members of the community.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the cost of the Russian war in Ukraine and argues that the consequences of a crash now would be worse than in 1998.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait is skeptical that the Trump-era EPA will deal well with global warming.
  • Discover’s The Crux considers the challenge of developing safer explosives for fireworkers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering the (real) possibility of Earth-like worlds orbiting neutron stars.
  • Language Log notes an odd use of katakana in Australia.
  • The LRB Blog considers the possibly overrated import of George Osborne’s move into the newspaper business.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one observer’s suggestion that China could sustain high-speed growth much longer than Japan.
  • The NYR Daily shares Eleanor Davis’ cartoon journal of her bike trip across America.
  • Peter Rukavina does not like the odd way Prince Edward Island made its library card into a museum pass.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the odd galaxy MACS2129-1, young yet apparently no longer star-forming.
  • Strange Company explores the strange death of 17th century New England woman Rebecca Cornell.
  • Unicorn Booty looks at how early Playgirl tried to handle, quietly, its substantially gay readership.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at one Russian proclaiming Russia needs to stop an imminent takeover by Muslims.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly photoblogs about her trip to Berlin.
  • Dead Things reports on a recent study that unraveled the evolutionary history of the domestic cat.
  • James Nicoll notes that his niece and nephew will each be performing theatre in Toronto.
  • Language Hat has an interesting link to interviews of coders as if they were translators.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at Chinese video game competitions and Chinese tours to Soviet revolutionary sites.
  • Steve Munro shares photos of the old Kitchener trolleybus.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of the Ramadan drummer of Coney Island.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay arguing that photographed subjects should provide they consent and receive renumeration.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Trans March.
  • Towleroad notes the cancellation of anti-gay convictions of Nazis.
  • Van Waffle shows the stories of the caterpillars in his backyard.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts an essay talking about the difficulties of translating the Book of Genesis.