A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘travel

[ISL] Five islands notes: Caribbean and Jamaica migration, Diomedes, Indonesia, Finland

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  • Lyman Stone, at In A State of Migration, takes a look at the slow population growth in even the well-off Caribbean, thanks to substantial emigration.
  • At Jamaica Observer, Edward Seaga summarizes the history of Jamaican emigration–economically necessary–and worries about the impact of Trump.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Big Diomede and Little Diomede, two islands in the Bering Strait that not only have different sovereigns (the US and Russia) but different dates, too.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at how the indigenous population of Siberut, an Indonesian island west of Sumatra, are dealing with the effects of deforestation and cultural disruption.
  • Global News reports on an entrepreneur who wants to make an island in Finland into a women-only resort.
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[NEWS] Four First Nations links: Colten Boushie, Poundmaker, Ullivik, statues

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  • The fact that a jury–carefully selected to have no jurors of First Nations background–found the killer of Cree man Colten Boushie innocent is a horror. The Toronto Star reports.
  • MacLean’s takes a look at the reasons for Cree sensitivities regarding the inclusion of Chief Poundmaker as a character in the new iteration of Civilization.
  • The Inuit of the northern Québec region of Nunavik, when sent south to Montréal for medical treatment, have an enclave in the city, the building of Ullivik. The Toronto Star reports.
  • This opinion piece in The Globe and Mail makes an excellent case for the removal of the statue of General Cornwallis from Halifax. Societies evolve; statues, alas, cannot.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Hodo Kwaja, King Street, HQ2, TDSB school trips, Ontario Place

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  • This CBC article highlighting Hodo Kwaja bakery in Koreatown and the delicious walnut cakes it makes is superb.
  • VICE shares the story of a man who went nightclubbing on King Street to gauge the effects of the transit experiment. (His judgement? There’s change, but this change is natural.)
  • Trudeau is going to play up Canadian diversity to Amazon as part of the Toronto bid for HQ2, reports The Globe and Mail.
  • The TDSB has loosened restrictions on school trips to the United States, with some qualifications. (If any one student is blocked at the border, for instance, the entire trip is off.) The Toronto Star examines the issue.
  • The further expansion of parkland at Ontario Place, as announced by the provincial government, is inspiring. The Toronto Star reports.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Eddie Chong at anthro{dendum} shares a listing of anthropology-relevant links from around the blogosphere.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a quick look at the sociology of food.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a court ruling making same-sex marriage imaginable has helped an evangelical Christian candidate leap to the front of Costa Rica’s presidential elections.
  • JSTOR Daily explains the import of President’s Day to, among others, non-Americans.
  • Language Hat examines the spelling of the Irish word “imbolc” or “imbolg”, used to describe a festival marking the start of spring.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money calls for legal enforcement of supply chains for minerals and the like, to ensure that they were not produce through human exploitation (for instance).
  • Miranda Vane at the LRB Blog introduces her readers to the northern English sport of Cumberland & Westmorland Wrestling.
  • Marginal Revolution highlights the argument of a commenter who argued that self-driving trucks cannot perform on themselves the tasks that human truckers are expected to. (Yet?)
  • The NYR Daily examines the transformation of Putin in office from mere oligarch to the world’s leading kleptocrat.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw celebrates a new Australian satirical newssite, the Betoota Advocate.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla notes new findings suggesting some Kuiper belt objects have huge moons, relatively and absolutely.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that while a powerful laser cannot rip up space literally, it can do pretty remarkable things nonetheless.
  • Towleroad shares an essay by Cyd Ziegler talking about the importance of gay Atlantis Cruise ships for him, in the light of a scandal onboard a ship involving a fatal drug overdose.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at, among other things, tulip trees and magnolias.

[ISL] Four islands links: Hawaii, British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Tuanaki

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  • Bloomberg describes the FCC report on the Hawaii missile scale earlier this month.
  • The British Virgin Islands are apparently continuing to undergo their recovery from Hurricane Irma, enough to become tourist attractions again. The Guardian reports.
  • Jonathan Levin and Yalixa Rivera look at Bloomberg at the astonishing lack of good data on Puerto Rico’s demographics after Hurricane Maria. How many have left? Estimates run all the way up to a half-million departures by the end of 2019.
  • Reddit’s unresolvedmysteries shares the story of the supposed Polynesian island of Tuanaki, which went suddenly missing in the 1840s. What happened? Did it ever exist?

[ISL] Five Prince Edward Island links

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  • News that lobsters experience pain when lowered into boiling water will have implications for the Island. CBC reports.
  • The National Post reports on a Legion hall in Tignish that shamefully refused a Sikh man entry on account of his headdress.
  • Happily, shipments of The Globe and Mail’s Saturday edition to Prince Edward Island have resumed. CBC goes into detail.
  • The Prince Edward Island government has contracted with three companies to grow three million grams of marijuana for local sale. CBC reports.
  • The University of Prince Edward Island will be offering a two-year Master’s program in tourism. CBC reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: Spadina Line 40th, King Street, tourism, Andrew Johnston

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  • Transit Toronto celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Spadina Line, western leg of Line 1.
  • The Globe and Mail hosts an article suggesting ways to make the King Street transit experiment work better.
  • David Rider notes that Toronto is becoming a major international tourism destination, attracting sizable contingents of visitors from around the world, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Over at NOW Toronto, Toronto comedian Andrew Johnton explains why, given the collapse of the (English Canadian) media ecosystem, if he has have a chance of earning a living from his career he has to go to the United States.