A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘travel

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: trains, climate change, allergies, India, fires, Midwest map

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  • MTL Blog looks at the proposal for a sleeper train connecting Montréal and New York City. (Can Toronto get one too, please?)
  • Lauren Pelley reports for CBC about how climate change leads, through increased pollen production, to worse allergies for residents of cities in Canada.
  • Guardian Cities reports that the fires in Alaska, too, outside of Anchorage, are things that dwellers of cities will have to get used to.
  • The heat island effect, CityLab warns, will be a major threat to life in the cities of India.
  • CityLab does an interesting crowdsourced map, tracing the boundaries of the American Midwest.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul reports on the critical walking tours of Istanbul offered by Nazlı Tümerdem.
  • Centauri Dreams features a guest post from Alex Tolley considering the biotic potential of the subsurface ocean of Enceladus.
  • The Crux reports on how paleontologist Susie Maidment tries to precisely date dinosaur sediments.
  • D-Brief notes the success of a recent project aiming to map the far side of the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • Cody Delistraty considers the relationship between the One Percent and magicians.
  • Todd Schoepflin writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about different sociological facts in time for the new school year.
  • Gizmodo shares a lovely extended cartoon imagining what life on Europa, and other worlds with subsurface worlds, might look like.
  • io9 features an interview with Annalee Newitz and Charlie Jane Anders on the intersection between science fiction writing and science writing.
  • JSTOR Daily briefly considers the pros and cons of seabed mining.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that a stagnant economy could be seen as a sign of success, as the result of the exploitation of all potential for growth.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the photographs of John Edmonds, a photographer specializing in images of queer black men.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a map of murders in Denmark, and an analysis of the facts behind this crime there.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on an anti-Putin shaman in Buryatia.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on dreams of going back to school, NSFW and otherwise.

[NEWS] Five links: gay genes, stone walls, US wealth, beaches, media

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  • That, as a new study suggests, there is no single gay gene, but rather multiple different originals for non-heterosexual sexual orientations and behaviours, makes intuitive sense to me. The Washington Post has one take.
  • Atlas Obscura looks at the history behind the stone walls of New England.
  • Justin Fox at Bloomberg examines how the once-commanding lead in incomes of the middle class of the United States over the middle classes of other countries is starting to fade.
  • CityLab looks at how, too often by design, beaches in the United States are inaccessible to mass transit. (Toronto is lucky.)
  • La Presse shares a proposal by Radio-Canada to move away from a media model of competing with other outlets towards one based on collaboration.

[ISL] Five #islands links: Shoal Lake 40, Martha’s Vineyard, Fogo, Ramea, Barbados

  • Maclean’s reports on how, a century after Shoal Lake 40 First Nation was made an island to provide drinking water for Winnipeg, it finally was connected to the mainland by a road.
  • CityLab reports on how the pressures of the tourist season make it difficult for many permanent residents of Martha’s Vineyard to maintain homes.
  • Fogo Island, Newfoundland, recently celebrated its first Pride Walk. CBC reports.
  • Yvette D’Entremont writes at the Toronto Star about how the diaspora of the Newfoundland fishing island of Ramea have gathered together for regular reunions.
  • J.M. Opal writes at The Conversation about the origins of white Anglo-American racism in 17th century Barbados.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Montréal, Hillsborough, Derry, Paris, Mecca

  • La Presse looks at the challenges facing changing Lachine-Est, here.
  • The small New Brunswick town of Hillsborough may lose its only grocery store. Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities looks at the vexed question of how, or if, the Northern Ireland city of Derry should celebrate its political murals.
  • Guardian Cities notes that Paris will soon host a substantial rooftop farm.
  • Tom van Laer and Elif Izberk-Bilgin at The Conversation explain why reviews of facilities in holy cities, like Mecca, tend to be so inflated.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: New York City, Los Angeles, Paris, Venice, Istanbul

  • The OS/2 operating system is used in New York City to run that metropolis subway system. VICE reports.
  • The problem of homelessness in Los Angeles, the Guardian reports, is shocking.
  • CityLab reports on plans for new sorts of urban forests outside famous landmarks in Paris.
  • DW reports on how people in Venice protest against the intrusions of huge cruise ships into their lagoon, threatening the delicate environment.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how the hipster class in Istanbul has begun to migrate to the countryside, driven out of their city by real estate prices and by politics.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Guelph, Hamilton, Lethbridge, Moncton, Halifax

  • blogTO suggests some things people could do on a day trip to Guelph (and commenters come up with more suggestions).
  • The lack of explicitly queer spaces in Hamilton is one thing that has come up in a recent study. Global News reports.
  • The Alberta city of Lethbridge, third-largest in the province, now has a population of more than one hundred thousand people. Global News reports.
  • Will the city of Moncton get rainbow crosswalks? Global News reports.
  • Halifax has faced complications in trying to pursue a commuter rail option. Global News reports.