A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘travel

[ISL] Five islands links: Qatar, Boracay, Vanuatu, Shetlands, CocoCay

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  • Saudi Arabia is planning to dig a canal the length of its border with Qatar, making that peninsular polity and island one. That is … intense. Gulf News reports.
  • The Filipino resort island of Boracay has been declared off-limits by President Duterte, at least until its environment is rehabilitated. The National Post reports.
  • The establishment of a Chinese base in Melanesian Vanuatu would upset geopolitical calculations in Australia. The Sydney Morning Herald reports.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that some supporters of Scotland’s Shetland Islands are opposed to the idea of putting the archipelago, so far from the mainland, in inset maps.
  • Royal Caribbean is making an island in the Bahamas, CocoCay, into a custom-designed resort at a cost of hundreds of millions of dollars. Bloomberg reports.
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[NEWS] Five LGBT links: Village killings of the 1970s, Grindr, Fire Island, Steve Rogers’ Brooklyn

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  • This long-form CBC article on a string of unsolved murders of gay men in the late 1970s is compelling, frightening reading.
  • Daily Xtra recently shared a Body Politic article from the 1970s by the late great Robin Hardy on the mysterious killings of gay men at the time. (Visibility, as Hardy suggests, can save lives.)
  • The suggestion that excessive dependency on Grindr and similar apps is not helping queer men form rewarding relationships does not sound inherently implausible to me. Vox has it.
  • Hornet Stories shares a guide to Fire Island, here.
  • Things With Wings looks at the history of New York City and Brooklyn and finds out that the neighbourhood where Steven Rogers lived in the 1930s and 1940s, Brooklyn Heights, was actually a mecca of out queer people and communities.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: All in the Family, hair salon, Northern Ireland, tourism, John Constantine

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  • Hornet Stories notes how All in the Family was path-breaking with its depiction of a gay character on TV back in 1971, here.
  • Making more LGBTQ-friendly hair salons is a worthy goal. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Northern Ireland may yet achieve marriage equality in the near future. Hornet Stories reports.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shares this useful map depicting which countries are, and are not, safe for LGBTQ tourists, here.
  • The representation of out bisexual DC character John Constantine on Legends of Tomorrow is interesting, and hopeful. The Atlantic looks at this.

[URBAN NOTE] Five cities links: Vancouver, Derry, Tehran, London, Kumamoto

  • Global News reports on how municipalities in the Metro Vancouver area have arranged to pay for new transit.
  • Slugger O’Toole has a multi-part investigation looking at why Derry, second city of Northern Ireland, is so poor. The first part is here.
  • Bloomberg notes that the real estate market in Tehran is definitely not friendly to hopeful buyers.
  • VICE reports on how activists in London turned an empty home into a homeless shelter.
  • The Finger Post’s David Finger shares photos of his recent visit to Kumamoto.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kamzib Kamrani looks at the Yamnaya horse culture of far eastern Europe and their connection to the spread of the Indo-Europeans.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the predicted collision of China’s Tiangong-1 space station. Where will it fall?
  • James Bow notes a Kickstarter funding effort to revive classic Canadian science fiction magazine Amazing Stories.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impending retirement of the pioneering Kepler telescope, and what’s being done in the time before this retirement.
  • D-Brief notes how nanowires made of gold and titanium were used to restore the sight of blind mice.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at the indigenous people of Riau province, the Siak, who have been marginalized by (among other things) the Indonesian policy of transmigration.
  • Dead Things reports on more evidence of Denisovan ancestry in East Asian populations, with the suggestion that the trace of Denisovan ancestry in East Asia came from a different Denisovan population than the stronger traces in Melanesia.
  • Hornet Stories paints a compelling portrait of the West Texas oasis-like community of Marfa.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how indigenous mythology about illness was used to solve a hantavirus outbreak in New Mexico in the 1990s.
  • Language Log praises the technical style of a Google Translate translation of a text from German to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, under the Shah, Iran was interested in building nuclear plants. Iranian nuclear aspirations go back a long way.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the unsettling elements of the literary, and other, popularity of Jordan Peterson.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the continuing existence of a glass ceiling even in relatively egalitarian Iceland.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the unsettling elements behind the rise of Xi Jinping to unchecked power. Transitions from an oligarchy to one-man rule are never good for a country, never mind one as big as China.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about Love, Cecil, a new film biography of photographer Cecil Beaton.
  • Peter Rukavina celebrates the 25th anniversary of his move to Prince Edward Island. That province, my native one, is much the better for his having moved there. Congratulations!
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a strange story of Russian speculation about Kazakh pan-Turkic irredentism for Orenburg that can be traced back to one of its own posts.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley takes the time to determine that Canadian university professors tend to be more left-wing than the general Canadian population, and to ask why this is the case.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes how the presence of methane in the subsurface oceans of Enceladus helps create a plausible dynamic for life there.
  • Crooked Timber notes another risk facing the UK in the era of Brexit, that of the United Kingdom’s already questionable data protection. How likely is it the EU will authorize data sharing with a business in an insecure third party?
  • D-Brief notes the conundrum posed by the profoundly corrosive dust of the Moon. How will future probes, never mind outposts, deal with it?
  • Cody Delistraty notes the profoundly problematic nature of the ethnographic museum in the post-imperial era. How can they adapt?
  • The LRB Blog notes the power of Stravinsky’s recently discovered Chant funebre.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how much Trump’s proposed steel tariffs now evoke Bush Jr’s like tariffs proposed a decade and a half ago.
  • Justin Petrone at north! writes about his visit to a strangely familiar southern Italy.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at international brands careful to cater to the nationalist sympathies of China, in their advertising and elsewhere.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Jason Davis explains NASA’s detailed plan for returning people to the Moon.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of a burning-hot street hotpot in Chongqing.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the idea of dark matter not being a particle.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society takes a look at the factors complicating the idea of consensus in a group.
  • John Scalzi celebrates the twentieth anniversary of his ownership of his scalzi com website.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Putin, with his boasting of advanced nuclear weapons, might start a 1980s-style arms race with the United States.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: New York City, Montréal, Hong Kong, Paris, Narva

  • Hornet Stories has a list of some of the key LGBTQ destinations in New York City. This is something for my next trip, I think.
  • Robert Everett-Green writes about the transformation of Montréal’s Viauville, once a model neighbourhood funded by 19th century cookie magnate Charles-Théodore Viau, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • Hong Kong is exceptionally pressed for space for housing, making land for commerce all the more difficult to come by. Bloomberg reports</u/.
  • France is planning to make a suburban wasteland in the northeast of the conurbation of Paris over into a vast forest. CityLab reports.
  • DW reports on how, one hundred years after Estonia first became independent, the country’s Russophones, particularly concentrated in the northeastern city of Narva, are now engaging with (and being engaged by) the wider country.