A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ukraine

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about a week of her life as a freelance writer, highlighting so much of her work relates to social connections as opposed to actual writing.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares an astonishingly prescient take by E.B. White on the power of television from 1938.
  • Hornet Stories notes the efforts of the Indonesian government to get the Google Play Store there to block 70 apps used by LGBT people.
  • At In a State of Migration, Lyman Stone looks at demographic trends in Hawaii, the other major insular possession of the United States. Low fertility and a high cost of living may actually lead to population decline there, too, in the foreseeable future.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death, at 59, of trailblazing gay comedian Bob Smith.
  • JSTOR Daily links/u> to a paper noting how Jewish resistance in the Warsaw Uprising played a critical role in shaping post-war Jewish identity.
  • Towleroad notes the announcement of an astonishingly preserved 1945 film clip showing gay men, out, at a pool party in 1945 Missouri.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one prominent Donbas separatists’ push for an aggressive response to the Ukrainian government over the collapse of Minsk, including an attempt to reclaim the remainder of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts from Kyiv.
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • The Big Picture shares adorable photos of baby animals.
  • Multi-planet system K2-138 is one of the systems found via crowdsourcing, Centauri Dreams notes.
  • I did not know that David Bowie and Brian Eno visited the Gugging mental health clinic in Austria in 1994. Dangerous Minds has the photos.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Mike Pence has tried to defend himself from Adam Rippon’s criticisms by lying about his past.
  • Information is Beautiful shares an infographic depicting the edit wars last year on Wikipedia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Northern Ireland may get a referendum on marriage equality, giving it a chance to catch up to the Republic of Ireland and to the rest of the United Kingdom.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a vintage article noting that trying to apply the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, which could unseat a sitting president if the president was disabled, could cause a constitutional crisis.
  • Language Hat notes a study suggesting that, as humans become more sedentary, linguistic evidence suggests smell becomes less important.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders: how many films, how many novels, have been about _women_, not men, who are difficult geniuses? Where is the female equivalent of House?
  • The NYR Daily examines the Afro-futurism of 20th century novelist George Schuyler and his Black No More.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what someone would see as they descended into a black hole.
  • At Towleroad, Steven Petrow tells how HIV/AIDS doctor Mathilde Krim saved his life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one, militant, response in the Donbas republics to the breakdown of the Minsk Accords with Ukraine.

[NEWS] Six GLBTQ links: Quinn Pallister, Ukraine, Poland, Caper in the Castro game, music, voice

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  • This Toronto Life Q&A with Quinn Pallister, the Hamilton baker who gained fame baking the world’s gayest cake, is a joy.
  • Politico Europe takes a look at the plight of LGBTQ Ukrainian refugees, particularly exposed to dislocation.
  • VICE takes a look at how queer Poles get by in contemporary Poland.
  • Gamasutra notes the recovery of a very early GLBTQ-themed computer game, the 1989 Caper in the Castro by C.M. Ralph.
  • VICE’s Noisey notes that queer women were very major players in pop music in 2017.
  • First Post shares a personal essay by Aniruddin Mahale talking about his experience with his “gay” voice.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross examines the connections between bitcoin production and the alt-right. Could cryptocurrency have seriously bad political linkages?
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes GW170680, a recent gravitational wave detection that is both immense in its effect and surprising for its detection being normal.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting hot Jupiters are so large because they are heated by their local star.
  • Crooked Timber counsels against an easy condemnation of baby boomers as uniquely politically malign.
  • Daily JSTOR notes one paper that takes a look at how the surprisingly late introduction of the bed, as a piece of household technology, changed the way we sleep.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1968 newspaper interview with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, talking about Charlie Manson and his family and their influence on him.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the opioid epidemic and the way that it is perceived.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell suggests that the unsolvable complexities of Northern Ireland may be enough to avoid a hard Brexit after all.
  • The LRB Blog describes a visit to a seaside village in Costa Rica where locals and visitors try to save sea turtles.
  • Lingua Franca reflects on the beauty of the Icelandic language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an awesome map depicting the locations of the stars around which we have detected exoplanets.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the ill health of North Korean defectors, infected with parasites now unseen in South Korea.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the revival of fonio, a West African grain that is now starting to see successful marketing in Senegal.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating book examining the functioning of urban villages embedded in the metropoli of south China.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious 1920 murder of famous bridge player Joseph Bowne Elwell.
  • Towleroad reports on Larnelle Foster, a gay black man who was a close friend of Meghan Markle in their college years.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although Ukraine suffered the largest number of premature dead in the Stalinist famines of the 1930s, Kazakhstan suffered the greatest proportion of dead.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell has a photo essay looking at the Berlin Brandenburg Airport, still years away from completion and beset by many complex failures of its advanced systems. What does the failure of this complex system say about others we may wish to build?

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber takes a quick look at the role of the shadow in art, here.
  • Daily JSTOR notes that, in the 18th century, the punch favoured by partiers was often put up against the tea favoured by the more civilized.
  • Language Hat notes that the British Library has preserved the only surviving copy of Il Kaulata Maltia, the first Maltese-language journal.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new study examining if easier divorce leads to assortative mating.
  • Justin Petrone at north! celebrates his life in November in Estonia.
  • Rocky Planet notes that Indonesia’s Mount Agung is experiencing volcanic eruptions of lava.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Putin’s Russia is trying to get Ukraine to take over Donbas on disadvantageous terms.

[NEWS] Four links from the former Soviet Union: Donbas, Crimean Tatars, Russian nationalism, Yandex

  • Open Democracy reports on what appears to be a coup waged in the Luhansk republic by the forces of Donetsk. What is going on in the twin Donbas republics, anyway?
  • Maxim Edwards reports from the Ukrainian border with Crimea, from Crimean Tatars rebuilding their communities in exile (again), over at Open Democracy.
  • Leonid Bershidsky suggests that the Russian ultranationalism promoted by Putin will remain virulent long after the man is gone, over at Bloomberg.
  • VICE reports on the quietly effective censorship that Russian-language search engine Yandex is forced to employ, here.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers, in the context of ‘Oumuamua, the import of shads and axis ratios. What does it suggest about the processes by which planetary systems form?
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a report suggesting that Russia is not at all likely to legalize bitcoins.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at Article 63, the German constitutional article that governs the selection of the Chancellor.
  • The Frailest Thing quotes a passage from Jacques Ellul about the adaptation of humans to a mechanized world.
  • Hornet Stories notes that out actor Russell Tovey is set to play the (also out) Ray in the Arrowverse, an anti-Nazi superhero from an alternate Earth.
  • Language Hat tells the story of Lin Shu, an early 20th century translator of European fiction into Chinese whose works were remarkably influential.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is amused by the story of a young university student who has used basic knowledge of Foucault to play with his family’s household rules.
  • The LRB Blog notes the very awkward, and potentially fatal, position of the Rohingya, caught between Burma and Bangladesh.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a talk recently given on fake maps, on maps used to lie and misrepresent and propagandize.
  • The NYR Daily meditates on the precocity and the homoeroticism inherent in the Hart Crane poem “The Bridge.”
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we can see, so far, only a surprisingly small fraction of the observable universe. (So far.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy celebrates the many defeats of Trump as he fights against sanctuary cities as a victory for federalism and against executive power.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a poll suggesting that, after 2014, while Crimeans may feel less Ukrainian they do not necessarily feel more Russian.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look, linguistically, at an Ian Frazier phrase: “That is aliens for you.”