A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ukraine

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.
  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans’ habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, “My Immortal”, has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)
  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.
  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry’s Auroville Café.
  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.
  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence’s introduction into our civilization to be managed.
  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.
  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.
  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.
  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada’s space future by the Space Advisory Board.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes how the media made a simulation of a third planet at Gliese 832 a discovery of a new Earth-like world.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on a consideration of why schoolchildren are labelled troublemakers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that 51 Eridani b has been discovered to be a cloudy world, and how.
  • Far Outliers notes how the decline of Temasek (the future Singapore) was followed by the rise of Melaka.
  • Hornet Stories tells of an Orthodox Christian priest in Australia, who, at the funeral of a lesbian, called for gays to be shot.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Catalonia’s parliament approved a referendum on secession.
  • The LRB Blog considers the import of Monte Testaccio, a man-made hill of rubble and waste dating from Roman times.
  • The NYR Daily considers the engaging and engaged pop art of Grayson Perry.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a lazy afternoon spent drinking New Zealand beer in a Moscow pub.
  • Towleroad notes an upcoming revealing documentary about Grace Jones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Donbas wars, mercenaries are becoming a major, potentially destabilizing force.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the conflict between quantitative data and qualitative stories in politics.

[NEWS] Five notes about the future of agriculture: the Island, Eurasia, Toronto, Netherlands

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  • Malcolm Campbell reports for CBC on how the Island’s organic agriculture sector is dealing with ineffective provincial regulation.
  • At the Toronto Star, Ainslie Cruickshank describes new measures to reserve GTA farmland in the Greenbelt for agricultural uses only.
  • Leonid Bershidsky reports for Bloomberg View on how climate change is making Russia–and Ukraine, and Kazakhstan–a major agricultural force.
  • At the Toronto Star, Alex McKeen reports on a North York warehouse that hosts a highly productive vertical farm.
  • Frank Viviano’s National Geographic article looking at the enormously productivity of high-tech agriculture in the Netherlands shows the future.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining a potential relationship between stars’ magnetic fields and exoplanets.
  • Hornet Stories links to the Instagram account of Tom Bianchi, still taking photos of Fire Island.
  • Language Hat notes the death of Ognen Cemerski, a Macedonian who went to heroic lengths to translate Moby Dick into his language.
  • Language Log notes an unusual hybrid Sino-Tibetan sign for a restaurant.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is appropriately savage with Hillbilly Elegy (at least of uncritical readings of said).
  • Marginal Revolutions links to a paper noting French cities, unlike British ones, are much more tightly tied to old Roman settlements, away from the sea.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw calls for the return of the Australian $2 bill.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the aftermath of rampant electoral fraud in Angola. What will come next?
  • Drew Rowsome takes a stand against, particularly in the context of Stephen King’s It, the now-common fear of clowns.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Erik Olin Wright’s thinking on possible utopias.
  • Window on Eurasia notes potential contributions of Russophone Belarusians and Ukrainians to the Russophone world, and notes some controversy in Moscow re: widely-observed Muslim holidays at start of the school year.

[PHOTO] Prince Voldymyr the Great, St. Vladimir Institute

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Prince Volodymyr the Great, St. Vladimir Institute

This painting of the prince of Kievan Rus whose conversion to Orthodox Christianity in 988 changed eastern Europe adorns this wall in the St. Vladimir Institute, a Ukrainian cultural centre on Spadina.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 25, 2017 at 11:00 am