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Posts Tagged ‘ukraine

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait suggests that strange markings in the upper atmosphere of Venus might well be evidence of life in that relatively Earth-like environment.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly raves over Babylon Berlin.
  • Centauri Dreams considers, fifty years after its publication, Clarke’s 2001.
  • Crooked Timber considers Kevin Williamson in the context of conservative intellectual representation more generally.
  • D-Brief considers “digisexuality”, the fusion of the digital world with sexuality. (I think we’re quite some way off, myself.)
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers evidence suggesting that the agricultural revolution in ancient Anatolia was achieved without population replacement from the Fertile Crescent.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the flight of Apollo 6, a flight that helped iron out problem with the Saturn V.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas is not impressed by the idea of the trolley problem, as something that allows for the displacement of responsibility.
  • Gizmodo explains why the faces of Neanderthals were so different from the faces of modern humans.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if volcano-driven climate change helped the rise of Christianity.
  • Language Log considers, after Spinoza, the idea that vowels are the souls of consonants.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money engages in a bit of speculation: What would have happened had Clinton won? (Ideological gridlock, perhaps.)
  • Lovesick Cyborg explores how the advent of the cheap USB memory stick allowed North Koreans to start to enjoy K-Pop.
  • Russell Darnley considers the transformation of the forests of Indonesia’s Riau forest from closed canopy forest to plantations.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some praise of inset maps.
  • Neuroskeptic considers how ketamine may work as an anti-depressant.
  • The NYR Daily considers student of death, Elisabeth K├╝bler-Ross.
  • Justin Petrone of north! shares an anecdote from the Long Island coastal community of Greenport.
  • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw considers the iconic Benjamin Wolfe painting The Death of General Wolfe.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Casey Dreier notes cost overruns for the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • pollotenchegg maps recent trends in natural increase and decrease in Ukraine.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about a special Hverabrau├░ in Iceland, baked in hot springs.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares his own proposal for a new Drake Equation, revised to take account of recent discoveries.
  • Vintage Space considers how the American government would have responded if John Glenn had died in the course of his 1962 voyage into space.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the belief among many Russians that had Beria, not Khrushchev, succeeded Stalin, the Soviet Union might have been more successful.
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[NEWS] Five science links: Ukraine in space, Archean Earth, oceans of Mars, looking for life, Icarus

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  • Ukraine is interested in funding spaceport developments in Australia. Transitions Online reports.
  • National Geographic notes evidence that the influx of oxygen into the Archean atmosphere more than two billion years ago was–geologically, at least–quite sudden.
  • Universe Today notes that volcanism on early Mars may have helped fill that planet’s primordial oceans.
  • National Geographic takes a look at the various strategies hypothetical extraterrestrial civilizations could adopt to find life–even us–from a great distance.
  • The discovery of Icarus, a discrete blue supergiant star detected nine billion light-years away, is a triumph of modern astronomy. VICE reports.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • James Bow makes the case for inexpensive regional bus transit in southern Ontario, beyond and between the major cities.
  • D-Brief explains why Pluto’s Gate, a poisonous cave of classical Anatolia believed to be a portal to the netherworld, is the way it is.
  • The Dragon’s Tales takes a look at the plethora of initiatives for self-driving cars and the consequences of these for the world.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at how Persia, despite enormous devastation, managed to eventual thrive under the Mongols, even assimilating them.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the connections between North American nuclear tests and the rise of modern environmentalism.
  • Language Hat looks at Linda Watson, a woman on the Isle of Man who has became the hub of a global network of researchers devoted to deciphering unreadable handwriting.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the argument that the Russian hacks were only as effective as they were because of terrible journalism in the United States.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at an often-overlooked collaboration in the 1960s between New York poet Frank O’Hara and Italian artist Mario Schifano.
  • Towleroad takes a look at out gay pop music star Troye Sivan.
  • Window on Eurasia makes the believable contention that Putin believes in his propaganda, or at least acts as if he does, in Ukraine for instance.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber seeks advice for academics trying to publish general-interest books.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the extent, and the way, in which technological change can outstrip the ability of cultures and institutions to manage this change.
  • Hornet Stories notes the many ways in which the Trump Presidency is proving to be terrible for HIV-positive people around the world.
  • Sara Jaffe at JSTOR Daily explores the concept of queer time. What is time like for queer people if the traditional markers of adulthood–marriage, children, and so on–are unavailable? How do they think of life stages?
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of language in Hong Kong under Chinese rule.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on the latest theatre piece of Jordan Tannahill, Declarations.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on declining flows of migrants from elsewhere in the former Soviet Union to Russia.

[NEWS] Five culture links: archeology in Canada, Baker Boy, Threads, Ukrainian churches, Kanopy

  • Archeology in Canada is starting to take a leading role in the reconciliation process with First Nations. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Baker Boy, an Australian Aborigine rapper from the Milingimbi community, is becoming a star with his raps in his native Yolngu Matha language. (Touring with 50 Cent is an achievement.) Australia’s SBS carries the story.
  • Threads, the infamous 1984 British film depicting the aftermath of nuclear war, is coming to Blu-ray. VICE’s Motherboard reports.
  • Andrei Fert writes at Open Democracy about how, after the appalling refusal of a priest in a Moscow-aligned Ukrainian Orthodox church to preside over the burial of a toddler baptized into a Kyiv-aligned church, that whole denomination is coming into disrepute.
  • blogTO notes the introduction, by the Toronto Public Library, of a new video streaming service, Kanopy, offering more than thirty thousand movies free to members.

[NEWS] Five notes about frontiers: South Tyrol, Brexit, Alps, eastern Ukraine, Djibouti

  • Alessio Colonelli takes issue with the granting of a right to Austrian citizenship to only select residents of South Tyrol, over at Open Democracy.
  • Immigration to the United Kingdom may be falling, Bloomberg reports, but this is not to the advantage of the British economy.
  • Migrants trying to travel from Italy to France are unwittingly risking the terrible snow-bound conditions of the Alps. The National Post has the story.
  • Bloomberg View suggests one way forward for peace in eastern Ukraine. I’m not sure, frankly, that this is a plausible path (that there are any, even).
  • Politico Europe takes a look at the exceptional strategic importance of Djibouti for militaries around the world, the US and China included.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about a week of her life as a freelance writer, highlighting so much of her work relates to social connections as opposed to actual writing.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares an astonishingly prescient take by E.B. White on the power of television from 1938.
  • Hornet Stories notes the efforts of the Indonesian government to get the Google Play Store there to block 70 apps used by LGBT people.
  • At In a State of Migration, Lyman Stone looks at demographic trends in Hawaii, the other major insular possession of the United States. Low fertility and a high cost of living may actually lead to population decline there, too, in the foreseeable future.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death, at 59, of trailblazing gay comedian Bob Smith.
  • JSTOR Daily links/u> to a paper noting how Jewish resistance in the Warsaw Uprising played a critical role in shaping post-war Jewish identity.
  • Towleroad notes the announcement of an astonishingly preserved 1945 film clip showing gay men, out, at a pool party in 1945 Missouri.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one prominent Donbas separatists’ push for an aggressive response to the Ukrainian government over the collapse of Minsk, including an attempt to reclaim the remainder of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts from Kyiv.